Translating God's Word
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    What do you look for in a Bible translation? Basically, there are two types: a literal (word for word) rendition and a dynamic equivalent (paraphrase or idiomatic). The first clings as closely as possible to the original language, that is, as much as idioms and word choice will allow. In contrast, the paraphrase is a “free” translation in which the translator seeks to express the original writer’s thoughts as he may interpret them rather than the exact words used in the text.
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    This group’s primary concern is using good translations as well as using a variety of English translations. However, our discussions can cover any area that is Bible related and, or related to Bible study and research. Our two group texts are Proverbs 2:1-6 and John 17:3. Here are some of the areas of interest for this group.
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    • Hermeneutics
    • History of Judaism
    • Textual Criticism
    • Bible Translation
    • Biblical Greek
    • Biblical Hebrew
    • Semantics
    • Exegesis
    • Doctrines
    • Archaeology
    • Bible Chronology
    • Theology
    • Inductive Bible Study
    • History of Christianity
    • History of Religion
    • How the Bible Came Down To Us
    • Customs and Culture
    • Study of Bible (Chapter by Chapter)
     
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    This list is not exhaustive, but it should give you some ideas. If anyone disagrees with another, simply quote the person and give your logical reason as to why. Then site a web address or a source, which may be a very good one, also, it may be very informative, but it is up to you to read it and find out how the previous poster is not quite right and explain it to the rest of us. At the end of your explanation you may site that website as your source.
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    There are enough hate boards out there tearing the throats of others out in the name of God ironically. That is not the case here. We are going to be Christlike and respect each other. We will pick the kindest of words when we disagree. Like: “I can appreciate where you are coming from, but I feel this…….. is the real reason for this….., do you see what I mean? The other may come back: “Yes, I see how you are getting where you are, but I must respectfully disagree because….
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    Our goal is to do good research, keep digging and show loving kindness to others in the process.
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    Your friend,
    Apologist

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    Translation is not interpretation at all. Translation is expressing the literal words from one language to another. Interpretation is expressing what those words mean in the proper context. It totally amazes me that christians can use gods words to kill or harm another individual when the only words that came directly from gods hands say THOU SHALT NOT KILL. There is ONE TEACHER ... THE CHRIST! He speaks to every individual. I learned this very early in my christian walk. One day I heard God say to me He did not want me to do something (nothing wicked) so I went to my pastor and explained what I was going to do and the pastor said he saw nothing wrong with doing it. As I walked home I heard God laughing and he said "What?, I tell you not to do something and you want a second opinion?" Too many "translations/interpretation" have one purpose. To try to justify doing something you know is not the will of God. There are only 2 rules. 1. Love the spirit of Truth an Righteousness above all else. 2. Express it by loving others. If you have a problem with those then no interpretation of Gods words will help you.

    James1951
    July 17, 2013
    2:48 PM
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    There is only one sense in which all translation is interpretation, and it is not what dynamic equivalent translators usually mean by their cliché. All translation is lexical or linguistic interpretation. That is, translators must decide what English word or phrase most closely corresponds to a given word of the original text. Leland Ryken (2009-10-02). Understanding English Bible Translation: The Case for an Essentially Literal Approach (pp. 23-24). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books.

    Bible-apologist
    November 7, 2011
    10:05 AM
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    Of course all translation is interpretation, and the whole argument between literal and dynamic equivalent proves it. However of those options eventually miss the point, in as much as they confine the relationship with text to the manifest story, and do not deal with the content (meaning) at all. In the final end the only meaningful relationship with the material arises from inner experience, when it finally dawns on us that the stories, whatever they may be are an expression of an inner experience, which can only be understood at that level. Until we get it that the stories are about ourselves, we can squabble over the trivia of translations, but the meaning will continue to escape us.

    vliscony
    November 7, 2011
    7:22 AM
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    I wanted to leave a comment about Adam knowing His wife after cain wa murdered,(Genesis 4:25-26, say's and I quote.And Adam knew His wife again,and she bore a son and named him Seth "For God has appointed another seed for me insread of Abel,whom Cain killed." And as for Seth,to him also a son wasborn;and he named him Enosh.Then men began to call on the name of the Lord.This was taken from the NKJV.

    Pastor Rich
    November 1, 2011
    1:34 PM
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