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Switch to Forum Live View They're Killing Wolves Again
1 year ago  ::  Dec 10, 2012 - 5:45PM #1
solfeggio
Posts: 8,539
Since being taken off the endangered species list, wolves are again being killed in the northern Rockies in the American West.

www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/10/gray-w...

scitechdaily.com/hunters-kill-yellowston...

abcnews.go.com/US/yellowstones-famous-al...

My question is:
If wolves are so important to the ecology of a region, which is why they were on the endangered species list in the first place, and for so many year, why were they taken off that list now?  

    
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1 year ago  ::  Dec 10, 2012 - 6:53PM #2
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

Dec 10, 2012 -- 5:45PM, solfeggio wrote:

Since being taken off the endangered species list, wolves are again being killed in the northern Rockies in the American West.

www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/10/gray-w...

scitechdaily.com/hunters-kill-yellowston...

abcnews.go.com/US/yellowstones-famous-al...

My question is:
If wolves are so important to the ecology of a region, which is why they were on the endangered species list in the first place, and for so many year, why were they taken off that list now?  

    



Solf,


Gray wolves in general are not an endangred species. Canada and Alaska have thriving populations,  as do many parts of the world. 


The wolves reintroduced into the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem in the mid-1990s were given temporary provisional endangered status, and placed under federal jurisdiction, to allow the population some time to take hold.


The idea all along was that the GYE wolves would be delisted, and management of them would be handed over to the states of Montana, Wyoming and Idaho. Since the wolves many years ago met -- indeed, exceeded by many times -- the pre-set population goals for the agreed-upon recovery levels, it only made sense to delist them.


Overall, wolf hunting has not been all that controversial. Again, it was understood from the start, these wolves would eventually be de-listed and hunted.


What's causing the controversy as of late is, some wolves from inside Yellowstone National Park, that were studied by biologists and popular with the public, have strayed outside the park, and been shot by hunters. 

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1 year ago  ::  Dec 10, 2012 - 8:28PM #3
farragut
Posts: 3,910

Havn't we been over all this a few months ago?

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1 year ago  ::  Dec 10, 2012 - 8:39PM #4
jane2
Posts: 14,289

Dec 10, 2012 -- 8:28PM, farragut wrote:


Havn't we been over all this a few months ago?




My thinking, exactly..................


Moderated by Jcarlinbn on Dec 12, 2012 - 01:48AM
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1 year ago  ::  Dec 10, 2012 - 8:43PM #5
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

Dec 10, 2012 -- 8:28PM, farragut wrote:


Havn't we been over all this a few months ago?





What's news now is, some very high-profile reasearch wolves with radio collars have been killed.


It's drawn international attention.

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1 year ago  ::  Dec 11, 2012 - 3:55PM #6
solfeggio
Posts: 8,539

Mouse -


Yes, it has drawn international attention.  In fact, the story was in our newspapers yesterday, which is where I saw it.


So, if it is OK to be killing wolves for 'trophies,' as stated in the article I read, or just because you don't happen to like wolves, and there are plenty of wolves around to be killed for fun - then why were conservation and environmental agencies so concerned for years?


According to reports published last year, wolves are an intrinsic and very important part of whatever ecosystem in which they happen to be a part:


www.yellowstonepark.com/2011/06/yellowst...


 

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1 year ago  ::  Dec 11, 2012 - 4:37PM #7
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

Solf, trust me, we're aware of the international attention this has brought. 


The wolf scat is really hitting the fan. 

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1 year ago  ::  Dec 13, 2012 - 5:17PM #8
mindis1
Posts: 7,136

Dec 10, 2012 -- 6:53PM, mytmouse57 wrote:


Again, it was understood from the start, these wolves would eventually be de-listed and hunted.



So, the purpose of re-introducing the wolves was just to provide hunters with the fun of killing them?  


Can you substantiate your claim?

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1 year ago  ::  Dec 13, 2012 - 6:00PM #9
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

Dec 13, 2012 -- 5:17PM, mindis1 wrote:


Dec 10, 2012 -- 6:53PM, mytmouse57 wrote:


Again, it was understood from the start, these wolves would eventually be de-listed and hunted.



So, the purpose of re-introducing the wolves was just to provide hunters with the fun of killing them?  


Can you substantiate your claim?




Wrong and false.


The purpose of re-introducing the wolves was to re-establish a viable population of them here, on part of their natural range, in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem -- which includes Yellowstone National Park and parts of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. 


That goal was attained, and the wolves were delisted. First, in Montana and Idaho -- and just this year in Wyoming.


As part of the managment plan for the wolves -- once jurisdiction was handed over to the states -- one measure applied in all three states to control their numbers and mitigate their effect on human interests was to sell hunting licences and allowing for seasonal public hunting of wolves. 


Before you try to go off on this with me again -- I will remind you, again,  that I've lived and worked in all three states, spent considerable time in Yellowstone and have had a front-row seat to the wolf program since its inception in the 1990s.


I've researched and written extensively about wolf-related issues, and know many of the top-notch wildlife biologists, agency heads and policy makers involved on a first-name basis. I also know many other people, such as conservationists, ranchers, outfitters and others, who have a direct stake in the wolf issue and first-hand experience with the various aspects and effects of living in close proximity to active wolf packs. 


Just earlier this year, I attended a superb lecture by Doug Smith, the head of the wolf project inside the Park, and perhaps one of the top wolf researchers in the world today.


(He's not opposed to them being hunted, by the way.)


I'm hardly a leading expert, but I can give well-informed opinions. I can also cite the opinons of experts, many of whom I've had face-to-face contact with. 


So yes, I can substantiate many things about the wolf reintroduction program and its history.


Thanks for asking. 

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1 year ago  ::  Dec 13, 2012 - 7:55PM #10
jane2
Posts: 14,289

Dec 13, 2012 -- 6:00PM, mytmouse57 wrote:


Dec 13, 2012 -- 5:17PM, mindis1 wrote:


Dec 10, 2012 -- 6:53PM, mytmouse57 wrote:


Again, it was understood from the start, these wolves would eventually be de-listed and hunted.



So, the purpose of re-introducing the wolves was just to provide hunters with the fun of killing them?  


Can you substantiate your claim?




Wrong and false.


The purpose of re-introducing the wolves was to re-establish a viable population of them here, on part of their natural range, in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem -- which includes Yellowstone National Park and parts of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. 


That goal was attained, and the wolves were delisted. First, in Montana and Idaho -- and just this year in Wyoming.


As part of the managment plan for the wolves -- once jurisdiction was handed over to the states -- one measure applied in all three states to control their numbers and mitigate their effect on human interests was to sell hunting licences and allowing for seasonal public hunting of wolves. 


Before you try to go off on this with me again -- I will remind you, again,  that I've lived and worked in all three states, spent considerable time in Yellowstone and have had a front-row seat to the wolf program since its inception in the 1990s.


I've researched and written extensively about wolf-related issues, and know many of the top-notch wildlife biologists, agency heads and policy makers involved on a first-name basis. I also know many other people, such as conservationists, ranchers, outfitters and others, who have a direct stake in the wolf issue and first-hand experience with the various aspects and effects of living in close proximity to active wolf packs. 


Just earlier this year, I attended a superb lecture by Doug Smith, the head of the wolf project inside the Park, and perhaps one of the top wolf researchers in the world today.


(He's not opposed to them being hunted, by the way.)


I'm hardly a leading expert, but I can give well-informed opinions. I can also cite the opinons of experts, many of whom I've had face-to-face contact with. 


So yes, I can substantiate many things about the wolf reintroduction program and its history.


Thanks for asking. 




Mouse, you keep many of us informed and upto-date................




 

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