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2 years ago  ::  Jun 13, 2012 - 7:39PM #1
solfeggio
Posts: 9,243

Microstamping is using laser technology to engrave a microscopic marking onto the tip of the firing pin and onto the breech face of a firearm.  When the gun is fired, the microscopic markings are transferred to the cartridge, which, in the case of a gun used in a crime, can then be used by police to identify the firearm.

Police say that this technology saves them time and helps them quickly identify guns used in crimes.  In other words, it is a useful tool in the fight against crime, and there is legislation pending in several states to require manufacturers of semiautomatic weapons to use this technology. 

But, as might be expected, the NRA and various gun rights groups are violently opposed to the idea. 

www.nytimes.com/2012/06/13/us/code-on-sh... 

Basically, gun owners don't like anybody telling them what they can or cannot do with their firearms, even it if is just a tiny restriction.

nyagv.org/

But why be so in opposition to something that could really help police solve gun crimes?  I don't get it.  

 

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 13, 2012 - 7:48PM #2
mainecaptain
Posts: 21,783

Unless one is planning to commit a crime there is no reason to object to this.

A tyrant must put on the appearance of uncommon devotion to religion. Subjects are less apprehensive of illegal treatment from a ruler whom they consider god-fearing and pious. On the other hand, they do less easily move against him, believing that he has the gods on his side. Aristotle
Never discourage anyone...who continually makes progress, no matter how slow. Plato..
"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives" Jackie Robinson
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2 years ago  ::  Jun 13, 2012 - 8:20PM #3
REteach
Posts: 14,585

I guess the question is our constitution would protect us from a Syrian-type leader?  I believe it was Venezuala that just banned guns--if Chavez was my president, would I want him to know I had not turned in my guns?


IMO, that would not happen in the US, and it would not bother me to have a chip in my guns.  But...

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize what you heard was not what I meant...
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2 years ago  ::  Jun 13, 2012 - 9:33PM #4
mountain_man
Posts: 39,470

Jun 13, 2012 -- 7:39PM, solfeggio wrote:

...Basically, gun owners don't like anybody telling them what they can or cannot do with their firearms, even it if is just a tiny restriction.


That's just too bad. They'll just have to get over it.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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2 years ago  ::  Jun 13, 2012 - 10:38PM #5
farragut
Posts: 4,015

This is America. A dictatorship could never happen here.

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2012 - 7:55AM #6
Estacia
Posts: 2,209

Jun 13, 2012 -- 7:48PM, mainecaptain wrote:

Unless one is planning to commit a crime there is no reason to object to this.


I completely agree!


 

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2012 - 11:17AM #7
TemplarS
Posts: 6,819

Sounds great, but the problem is, a lot of guns used in crimes are stolen or otherwise acquired under the table.  So while you could trace the gun to the manufacturer and the place it was originally sold- the trail to the current user might be difficult to follow.

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2012 - 2:01PM #8
rabello
Posts: 21,292

Jun 13, 2012 -- 7:39PM, solfeggio wrote:


Microstamping is using laser technology to engrave a microscopic marking onto the tip of the firing pin and onto the breech face of a firearm.  When the gun is fired, the microscopic markings are transferred to the cartridge, which, in the case of a gun used in a crime, can then be used by police to identify the firearm.

Police say that this technology saves them time and helps them quickly identify guns used in crimes.  In other words, it is a useful tool in the fight against crime, and there is legislation pending in several states to require manufacturers of semiautomatic weapons to use this technology. 

But, as might be expected, the NRA and various gun rights groups are violently opposed to the idea. 

www.nytimes.com/2012/06/13/us/code-on-sh... 

Basically, gun owners don't like anybody telling them what they can or cannot do with their firearms, even it if is just a tiny restriction.

nyagv.org/

But why be so in opposition to something that could really help police solve gun crimes?  I don't get it.  

 




Yes you do.


The NRA is a very wealthy lobbying group and is very successful in convincing vulnerable people that any sort of "regulation" is equivalent to "banning" and that anything that could even hypothetically identify a gun is "treating" them like criminals when they are not. 


Unfortunately, we don't have many real leaders in Congress that won't bow to the gun lobby.


The NRA opposed regulating "cop killer bullets" -- a regulation that was supported by police departments across the country -- for whatever reason. I guess they want to be able to shoot a cop if ever a cop acts like a boogeyman and breaks into their house.   "Cop killer bullets" aren't needed for hunting or for self protection.   They opposed renewing the ban on assault weapons, too.


Next time somebody tells you guns are already regulated in the US of A, just roll your eyes.

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2012 - 2:04PM #9
Stardove
Posts: 15,443

Jun 14, 2012 -- 11:17AM, TemplarS wrote:


Sounds great, but the problem is, a lot of guns used in crimes are stolen or otherwise acquired under the table.  So while you could trace the gun to the manufacturer and the place it was originally sold- the trail to the current user might be difficult to follow.



Excellent point.  Gun owners like myself who have nothing to hide most likely wouldn't care.  Those who get guns illegally and commit a crime could never be traced. 


Let say a gun gets stolen which I have had happen in the mid 70's.  Never even got a chance to fire the gun.  The first time I went to get the gun to go to the range it was gone.  I thought someone I knew took the gun, but there was no way to prove who the thief was. 


Anyway, if that gun had microstamping then was used in a crime I would have to prove it was stolen, and I wasn't involved in the shooting/crime.  I can't even remember if I reported the stolen gun it has been so long ago.  We did stop leaving a hidden key outside the house though...too little...too late.




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2 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2012 - 6:09PM #10
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782


First, I question how practical this would even be. Sure, new firearms could be outfitted with this as they are made, and I see no problem with that. 


But, is everybody going to be expected to bring their firearms they already own in for micro-stamping?


Secondly, it's not really needed. Firearms already leave unique charecteristics on spent cartridge casings or shotgun shells. No two firing pins are going to strike in exactly the same place anyway.


I have two 12 gauge shotguns -- both Remingtons. It could easily be determined which shell had been fired from which one, based upon the firing pins. 


In the case of my favorite hunting rifle, I'd really be hosed if I ever used if for nefarious purposes. My father had it rechambered for a wildcat (custom) cartridge. You can't buy ammunition for it, it all has to be hand-loaded, and the cartridge casings are distinct. Even though I certianly live in "gun country," there's probably not another one like it in the county, or maybe even the state.


Also, ejection mechanisms in each firearm with a repeating action (semi-auto, pump, lever, bolt, etc.) leave unique marks on spent cartrige casings and shotgun shells anyway. 

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