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Switch to Forum Live View 18 yr old Sentenced for Texting and Driving.
2 years ago  ::  Jun 07, 2012 - 8:06PM #11
wohali
Posts: 10,227

"If he's caught behind the wheel in the next 15 years, I think execution would be appropriate...."


Wow....................

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2012 - 11:15AM #12
Cesmom
Posts: 4,735

The whole situation is just so incredibly sad...two families forever affected by this.


I know it's not realistic, but sometimes it seems like the roads would be a lot safer if we didn't let teenagers drive at all.  I mean, look at the accident statistics.  Let's face it, teenagers in general are more likely to use poor judgment (like texting or other distracted driving).  Their poor judgment holds a lot of power when they take a vehicle out on the road.  It can cost their life and someone elses.  


My 16 year old gets tired of listening to my lectures every time I hear about an accident like this.  Looks like she's going to get tired of another lecture.  Scary!

Our need to learn should always outweigh our need to be right

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

More people would learn from their mistakes if they weren't so busy denying them.
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2 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2012 - 3:44PM #13
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

However, texting isn't the only communication form that distracts drivers. The Mythbusters demonstrated that even hands-free cell phone conversations distract drivers enough to cause an accident. People simply can't focus well enough upon both what they're saying and hearing via the phone and what's happening around them while driving.


I've found that it's dangerous for me to talk via Bluetooth while driving. I realized after seeing that episode of Mythbusters that I'm not focused enough on what I'm doing when I'm trying to carry on a phone conversation while driving.


As a result, I text my husband that I'm going somewhere when I get into the car and will call him when I get there or return home if I'll be out during his break or lunchtime.


It scares me when I see people driving with a cellphone held to an ear. There's no way they can be capable of reacting as quickly as could be necessary when they're driving one-handed and are distracted by the conversation. I've been behind people who were weirdly speeding up, slowing down and weaving from side-to-side in the lane which made me think there was a drunk ahead of me until I saw the hand to the ear.


Just like drunks, people tend to think they're more in control than they actually are when talking on the phone.

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2012 - 4:11PM #14
Cesmom
Posts: 4,735

Jun 8, 2012 -- 3:44PM, DotNotInOz wrote:


However, texting isn't the only communication form that distracts drivers. The Mythbusters demonstrated that even hands-free cell phone conversations distract drivers enough to cause an accident. People simply can't focus well enough upon both what they're saying and hearing via the phone and what's happening around them while driving.


I've found that it's dangerous for me to talk via Bluetooth while driving. I realized after seeing that episode of Mythbusters that I'm not focused enough on what I'm doing when I'm trying to carry on a phone conversation while driving.


As a result, I text my husband that I'm going somewhere when I get into the car and will call him when I get there or return home if I'll be out during his break or lunchtime.


It scares me when I see people driving with a cellphone held to an ear. There's no way they can be capable of reacting as quickly as could be necessary when they're driving one-handed and are distracted by the conversation. I've been behind people who were weirdly speeding up, slowing down and weaving from side-to-side in the lane which made me think there was a drunk ahead of me until I saw the hand to the ear.


Just like drunks, people tend to think they're more in control than they actually are when talking on the phone.




That's true.  I saw the same mythbusters episode.  It was really interesting.  They said that there is something different and more distracting about talking to someone over the phone vs. talking to someone who is sitting in the seat next to you.  I do think that texting is more distracting than talking, though.  I tell my teenager to never talk on the cell phone when she's driving either, but I would be much more upset at the idea of texting.  

Our need to learn should always outweigh our need to be right

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

More people would learn from their mistakes if they weren't so busy denying them.
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2 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2012 - 4:12PM #15
Stardove
Posts: 15,361

There are apps for cell phones to automatically reply you cannot text back at the moment.  When it safe or you out of meeting, etc. you can see who texted you.  I had an app on my Blackberry which did this, but haven't added an app to my new smart phone...yet, so I don't have a particular one to recommend.


I do use a blue tooth when I drive for calls.  I find talking with it no different than if I had a passenger in the car talking to me, but I'm not a teenager either. 


The accident is tragic all around for everyone involved.

Beliefnet Community Wide Moderator ~ Peace Love Stardove
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2 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2012 - 4:16PM #16
Estacia
Posts: 2,209

Many are so into themselves that hurting someone (even accidently) is NOT on their mind/s.



 

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2012 - 6:58PM #17
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Jun 8, 2012 -- 4:11PM, Cesmom wrote:


That's true.  I saw the same mythbusters episode.  It was really interesting.  They said that there is something different and more distracting about talking to someone over the phone vs. talking to someone who is sitting in the seat next to you.



I suspect from having taught interpersonal communication for a number of years that talking on a cellphone, even hands-free, is more distracting because nonverbal cues we process so automatically and unconsciously are going to be more limited via phone than if a passenger speaks to us. The signals that convey what is meant must go through several devices in order to get from the sender to the receiver during a phone conversation.


While a cellphone conveys many of the tonal nuances of a person's voice, there is likely to be some degree of reduction in the vibrancy of the voice as well as a reduction in some of the cues we use to determine how to react or respond. That may not seem an important concern, but I found it amazing how very significant nonverbal cues proved to be based upon the results my students and I had from the various exercises we did that involved interpretation of nonverbal cues and how easily the absence of some of those cues can affect understanding.


And when you consider that research has shown that we get 95% of our understanding of meaning from nonverbal cues, a slight deficit in vocal cues could be dramatic and lead to more attention than is safe while driving being paid to the phone conversation.

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2012 - 9:05PM #18
TemplarS
Posts: 6,776

Make it 3 for the Mythbusters episode.  


But I believe texting is worse yet.  While you are talking, your mind may be distracted but your eyes are still functioning. Reading a text, your eyes can't be on two things at once. Sending a text, your eyes and hands are both missing in action.  I haven't seen any studies, but common sense says that has to be worse.

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 12, 2012 - 4:58AM #19
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Jun 8, 2012 -- 9:05PM, TemplarS wrote:


Make it 3 for the Mythbusters episode.  


But I believe texting is worse yet.  While you are talking, your mind may be distracted but your eyes are still functioning. Reading a text, your eyes can't be on two things at once. Sending a text, your eyes and hands are both missing in action.  I haven't seen any studies, but common sense says that has to be worse.




I don't think anyone is suggesting that texting while driving isn't substantially more dangerous.


The point was that talking on the phone was demonstrated to be more risky than laws acknowledge as well as people are aware.


 

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