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Switch to Forum Live View 115 Years old and still going strong
2 years ago  ::  Apr 21, 2012 - 6:40PM #1
solfeggio
Posts: 9,085
The world's oldest man just celebrated his 115th birthday.  He's a farmer from Kyoto, Japan, and he says he's always eaten small portions of food, and been the sort of a guy who always looked to the sky.  As well, he thinks of himself as a someone who is always trying to learn new things.

Sounds like a good recipe for longevity to me. 

www.webpronews.com/worlds-oldest-living-...


www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2132700...
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 21, 2012 - 8:09PM #2
mountain_man
Posts: 39,079

Good for him. I'd rather have a shorter life well lived than a long one just for the sake of longevity.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 21, 2012 - 10:58PM #3
solfeggio
Posts: 9,085

I think you'd have to define 'well lived' as opposed to not well lived if you want to make a point.


From reading the information provided about the gentleman in question, it seems as if he has (so far) lived a productive, happy life.


After all, there's no reason why a very long life shouldn't be well lived, too.


 

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 22, 2012 - 12:47AM #4
mountain_man
Posts: 39,079

Apr 21, 2012 -- 10:58PM, solfeggio wrote:

I think you'd have to define 'well lived' as opposed to not well lived if you want to make a point.


I could define it for myself. You'll have to define it for yourself.


From reading the information provided about the gentleman in question, it seems as if he has (so far) lived a productive, happy life.


Good for him.


After all, there's no reason why a very long life shouldn't be well lived, too.


I go for quality, not quantity. You, or the old guy, can do what you want with your lives.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 22, 2012 - 1:14AM #5
solfeggio
Posts: 9,085

You seem to be implying that living into what we call old age means we somehow drop off the productivity scale.  But, what if you're not productive, and you just sit around watching TV and petting your dog, but you're still content and happy with your life?


Doesn't that count, too?


As I said, what, exactly, defines a 'well lived' life?


For myself - Although I'm in my 71st year, I do like to think that I'm still productive in many different ways, and still giving something back to my family and to the community!


 

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 22, 2012 - 10:02AM #6
mountain_man
Posts: 39,079

Apr 22, 2012 -- 1:14AM, solfeggio wrote:

You seem to be implying that living into what we call old age means we somehow drop off the productivity scale.


And you seem to believe we all can live to 115 and run marathons. I'll go by what happens to most and admit that productivity starts to drop off around 75 and goes even faster after 85. One person living to 115 changes none of that.


As I said, what, exactly, defines a 'well lived' life?


For myself - Although I'm in my 71st year, I do like to think that I'm still productive in many different ways, and still giving something back to my family and to the community!


That's right, it's something you have to define for yourself.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 22, 2012 - 12:47PM #7
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

I'm not too hung up on how long I'll live. Just long enough to be a grouchy old man, sitting on my porch yelling, "Hey you damn kids, get outta my yard!"


That would work for me.

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 22, 2012 - 1:05PM #8
Mlyons619
Posts: 16,571

My grandmother lived to be 102.  She outlived her husband by a good 30 years and outlived her only child - my mother - by ten.  She had cateracts and severe arthritis, and spent the last five years of her life in a "home."  The few letters I got from her (dictated to a cousin of my mom's) usually ended with, "I'm ready to meet my Maker, I hope He hasn't forgotten about me."


Is it possible to live TOO long?

"No freedom without education"
            --Thomas Jefferson

"NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition"
            -- Monty Python
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 22, 2012 - 2:09PM #9
rabello
Posts: 20,798

I don't see what there is to argue about, here.   Even those who prefer to die while they're still young and productive can be impressed by someone who makes it to 115 years of age, since it is such a rarity.   If he were being kept alive artificially, that would be another story.   Of course, one can take the "decline" factor too far, since we start to loose muscle and mental accuity in our 40s and really start to die the moment we are born.  I like "Live Long and Prosper" myself.

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 22, 2012 - 5:48PM #10
Mlyons619
Posts: 16,571

We live as long as we live.  If we prosper while we live then one can claim a productive live.  If we are able to give ourselves to the betterment of others then our life is worthwhile, however long it is.

"No freedom without education"
            --Thomas Jefferson

"NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition"
            -- Monty Python
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