Post Reply
Page 5 of 5  •  Prev 1 2 3 4 5
Switch to Forum Live View Teacher Fired over Trayvon Martin fundraiser
2 years ago  ::  Apr 18, 2012 - 11:12AM #41
mountain_man
Posts: 38,727

Apr 18, 2012 -- 9:22AM, arielg wrote:

So, what is the "message"you want to send? Don't give a damn about rules and just do whatever you want to do?


What rule did the teacher break?

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 18, 2012 - 11:19AM #42
Girlchristian
Posts: 11,034

Apr 18, 2012 -- 11:12AM, mountain_man wrote:


Apr 18, 2012 -- 9:22AM, arielg wrote:

So, what is the "message"you want to send? Don't give a damn about rules and just do whatever you want to do?


What rule did the teacher break?




According to the article: then fired her after she showed up at the school to drop off prizes for students when she had been told to stay away, the SPLC said.

She went on school property after being suspended and told she couldn't go on school property. Regardless of whether or not the suspension was appropriate (IMO, it wasn't) she then chose to break the rules which gave them what they needed to legitimately fire her.

"No matter how dark the moment, love and hope are always possible." George Chakiris

“For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't believe, no proof is possible.” Stuart Chase
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 18, 2012 - 5:47PM #43
mountain_man
Posts: 38,727

Apr 18, 2012 -- 11:19AM, Girlchristian wrote:

According to the article: then fired her after she showed up at the school to drop off prizes for students when she had been told to stay away, the SPLC said.


To stay away from the school? Not likely.


She went on school property after being suspended and told she couldn't go on school property.


She was suspended but that does not include a prohibition from being on school property - at least that's what the teachers I know say. She was fired because she did something the principal did not like; encouraging her students to get involved in the community.


Regardless of whether or not the suspension was appropriate (IMO, it wasn't) she then chose to break the rules which gave them what they needed to legitimately fire her.


You, and everyone else here, doesn't have the whole story. Most likely she did nothing wrong other than going against the bigoted principles of the principal.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 18, 2012 - 7:04PM #44
Girlchristian
Posts: 11,034

Apr 18, 2012 -- 5:47PM, mountain_man wrote:


Apr 18, 2012 -- 11:19AM, Girlchristian wrote:

According to the article: then fired her after she showed up at the school to drop off prizes for students when she had been told to stay away, the SPLC said.


To stay away from the school? Not likely.


She went on school property after being suspended and told she couldn't go on school property.


She was suspended but that does not include a prohibition from being on school property - at least that's what the teachers I know say. She was fired because she did something the principal did not like; encouraging her students to get involved in the community.


Regardless of whether or not the suspension was appropriate (IMO, it wasn't) she then chose to break the rules which gave them what they needed to legitimately fire her.


You, and everyone else here, doesn't have the whole story. Most likely she did nothing wrong other than going against the bigoted principles of the principal.




We don't know what happened. What we do know is that the kids wanted to hold a fundraiser and the school said no. According to the civil rights group defending the teacher, the teacher encouraged the students to ask the administrators in person themselves. According to the school she was then suspended and told to stay off school property (which makes sense since students aren't allowed on school property when suspended, why would a teacher be), but she chose to go on school property anyway. We can assume this has to do with bigotry, but according to the administrator it was the timing of the fundraiser (testing, end of year). None of us really knows and won't until more details come out. Right now, everything we discuss is assumption based on what little info we have.

"No matter how dark the moment, love and hope are always possible." George Chakiris

“For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't believe, no proof is possible.” Stuart Chase
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 18, 2012 - 7:59PM #45
mountain_man
Posts: 38,727

Apr 18, 2012 -- 7:04PM, Girlchristian wrote:

We don't know what happened. What we do know is that the kids wanted to hold a fundraiser and the school said no.


That's right, the students wanted to do this, not the teacher. The teacher did the right thing and asked for permission - AND GOT IT! The school principal got upset over this and fired the teacher.


According to the civil rights group defending the teacher, the teacher encouraged the students to ask the administrators in person themselves. According to the school she was then suspended and told to stay off school property (which makes sense since students aren't allowed on school property when suspended, why would a teacher be),


That's obvious, teachers are not students. Was she told to say off school property?


....but she chose to go on school property anyway.


Did she? Or was she telling the students the principal said no?


We can assume this has to do with bigotry, but according to the administrator it was the timing of the fundraiser (testing, end of year). None of us really knows and won't until more details come out. Right now, everything we discuss is assumption based on what little info we have.


I doubt the testing season had anything to do with it. Most likely the principal didn't like the idea of someone above him giving permission and took it out on the teacher.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 18, 2012 - 9:28PM #46
costrel
Posts: 6,226

More than likely, this 26-year-old did not have tenure yet. I have been told that until a teacher has attained tenure, a district really doesn't have to have a valid and detailed reason for getting rid of a teacher. 

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 19, 2012 - 12:02AM #47
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Apr 18, 2012 -- 9:28PM, costrel wrote:


More than likely, this 26-year-old did not have tenure yet. I have been told that until a teacher has attained tenure, a district really doesn't have to have a valid and detailed reason for getting rid of a teacher. 




More than a little wisdom in that, costrel. After college, in my third year of teaching I ws highly monitored because tenure would be a factor. I was pregnant so it didn't matter. I'm sure I would have been granted tenure had I wished to stay.




 

discuss catholicism
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 19, 2012 - 6:37AM #48
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Apr 18, 2012 -- 9:28PM, costrel wrote:


More than likely, this 26-year-old did not have tenure yet. I have been told that until a teacher has attained tenure, a district really doesn't have to have a valid and detailed reason for getting rid of a teacher. 




A 26-year-old elementary or secondary-level teacher could very easily have been tenured. The requirements vary and are often much less stringent than in colleges or universities.


Tenure means squat in public schools in states that don't have strong unions or are right-to-work.


My best friend had gotten excellent reviews for several years until the vice-principal became principal of her school and the former principal switched to principal of the middle school where she also taught. She continued during the year that followed to get excellent reviews from the middle school principal. However, her first and succeeding reviews from the new high school principal were almost wholly negative, resulting in her being fired.


Subsequently, she learned that the daughter of the president of the school board was finishing teacher training during that year and was hired as her replacement. The high school principal and school board president were close friends.


Why my friend's reviews suddenly became so negative was then evident.


It's incredibly easy to concoct a "valid and detailed reason" for firing a tenured teacher if an administrator is highly motivated to do so. All the administrator has to do is lie. 


 




 

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 19, 2012 - 7:02AM #49
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Apr 18, 2012 -- 11:19AM, Girlchristian wrote:


Apr 18, 2012 -- 11:12AM, mountain_man wrote:


Apr 18, 2012 -- 9:22AM, arielg wrote:

So, what is the "message"you want to send? Don't give a damn about rules and just do whatever you want to do?


What rule did the teacher break?




According to the article: then fired her after she showed up at the school to drop off prizes for students when she had been told to stay away, the SPLC said.

She went on school property after being suspended and told she couldn't go on school property. Regardless of whether or not the suspension was appropriate (IMO, it wasn't) she then chose to break the rules which gave them what they needed to legitimately fire her.




I don't think we know enough about what occurred to know whether or not the suspension was appropriate. It's difficult to tell from the OP source which obviously supports the teacher's side.


Getting permission for a project of this type would be the teacher's responsibility. So, I can see why administrators thought it wasn't handled correctly if Harris urged students to approach administrators to seek permission. That's simply not how such things are done; the teacher is the one to make such a request.


However, if the story is correct that Harris was told to stay off school property while suspended but went to the school to drop off prizes, then she indeed did something stupid and gave the district a reason to fire her. What she ought to have done was to get another teacher to take the prizes to the school for her or send them by mail or other delivery service. 

Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 5 of 5  •  Prev 1 2 3 4 5
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook