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Switch to Forum Live View Religious extremists at it again.....
3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 6:22PM #141
Erey
Posts: 19,423

I went only went to public universities and colleges.  Whereas I was never a science major I did of course have to take science courses.  I remember several of the professors talking about the mystery of the universe and how somethings might indicate something God like.  Those times although brief were very interesting to me. 

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 7:11PM #142
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Apr 6, 2012 -- 6:22PM, Erey wrote:


I went only went to public universities and colleges.  Whereas I was never a science major I did of course have to take science courses.  I remember several of the professors talking about the mystery of the universe and how somethings might indicate something God like.  Those times although brief were very interesting to me. 




Some of us even studied theology and philosophy in depth. Different course-work includes different perspectives. Our college and university courses should teach how to think not what to think--mine did just that.


 


 




 

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 7:51PM #143
mountain_man
Posts: 40,651

Apr 6, 2012 -- 7:11PM, jane2 wrote:

Some of us even studied theology and philosophy in depth. Different course-work includes different perspectives. Our college and university courses should teach how to think not what to think--mine did just that.


In one upper level biology class ONE student, the only one in my many years of college, questioned evolution. In a stern reply the prof said that she is teaching the science and that the student had better get the answers correct on the test or he would fail the class. He did not attend any more classes.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 8:13PM #144
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849

Apr 6, 2012 -- 7:51PM, mountain_man wrote:


Apr 6, 2012 -- 7:11PM, jane2 wrote:

Some of us even studied theology and philosophy in depth. Different course-work includes different perspectives. Our college and university courses should teach how to think not what to think--mine did just that.


In one upper level biology class ONE student, the only one in my many years of college, questioned evolution. In a stern reply the prof said that she is teaching the science and that the student had better get the answers correct on the test or he would fail the class. He did not attend any more classes.





Wow- that's too bad. Said quitter might have learned something -had he remained. Education is supposed to expand the mind- not confirm ignorance.


(no one ever died of too much knowledge)


 


Irene.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 8:50PM #145
mountain_man
Posts: 40,651

Apr 6, 2012 -- 8:13PM, IreneAdler wrote:

Wow- that's too bad. Said quitter might have learned something -had he remained. Education is supposed to expand the mind- not confirm ignorance.


That's the problem with many creationists; they do not want to learn anything that would cause them to question their emotionally held beliefs.


(no one ever died of too much knowledge)


Not true. Many have been killed because of their knowledge. Long ago, not so much today, conquering armies would kill off the educated. Pol Pot targeted teachers. It wasn't so much their knowledge, but they were smart enough to be competition. 

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 8:52PM #146
costrel
Posts: 6,226

Apr 6, 2012 -- 7:51PM, mountain_man wrote:

Apr 6, 2012 -- 7:11PM, jane2 wrote:

Some of us even studied theology and philosophy in depth. Different course-work includes different perspectives. Our college and university courses should teach how to think not what to think--mine did just that.


In one upper level biology class ONE student, the only one in my many years of college, questioned evolution. In a stern reply the prof said that she is teaching the science and that the student had better get the answers correct on the test or he would fail the class. He did not attend any more classes. 


On the first day of my Astronomy 101 course, the professor made it very clear that this was an astronomy course, and we would not be discussing astrology, and those students who were expecting a course on horoscopes, star-crossed lovers, and the power and influence of the zodiac on human affairs should consider whether they really wanted to take this course.


I see discussions of mythological-based and religious-based forms of creationism and intelligent design in a biology class to be no different than discussions of horoscopes, the zodiac, and tarot readings in an astronomy class. 

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 9:02PM #147
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849

Apr 6, 2012 -- 8:52PM, costrel wrote:


Apr 6, 2012 -- 7:51PM, mountain_man wrote:

Apr 6, 2012 -- 7:11PM, jane2 wrote:

Some of us even studied theology and philosophy in depth. Different course-work includes different perspectives. Our college and university courses should teach how to think not what to think--mine did just that.


In one upper level biology class ONE student, the only one in my many years of college, questioned evolution. In a stern reply the prof said that she is teaching the science and that the student had better get the answers correct on the test or he would fail the class. He did not attend any more classes. 


On the first day of my Astronomy 101 course, the professor made it very clear that this was an astronomy course, and we would not be discussing astrology, and those students who were expecting a course on horoscopes, star-crossed lovers, and the power and influence of the zodiac on human affairs should consider whether they really wanted to take this course.


I see discussions of mythological-based and religious-based forms of creationism and intelligent design in a biology class to be no different than discussions of horoscopes, the zodiac, and tarot readings in an astronomy class. 





So did anyone exit the class once they learned they would not be studying astrology?


("Gee, I thought they spelled it funny.")


Irene.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 9:18PM #148
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Apr 6, 2012 -- 8:52PM, costrel wrote:


Apr 6, 2012 -- 7:51PM, mountain_man wrote:

Apr 6, 2012 -- 7:11PM, jane2 wrote:

Some of us even studied theology and philosophy in depth. Different course-work includes different perspectives. Our college and university courses should teach how to think not what to think--mine did just that.


In one upper level biology class ONE student, the only one in my many years of college, questioned evolution. In a stern reply the prof said that she is teaching the science and that the student had better get the answers correct on the test or he would fail the class. He did not attend any more classes. 


On the first day of my Astronomy 101 course, the professor made it very clear that this was an astronomy course, and we would not be discussing astrology, and those students who were expecting a course on horoscopes, star-crossed lovers, and the power and influence of the zodiac on human affairs should consider whether they really wanted to take this course.


I see discussions of mythological-based and religious-based forms of creationism and intelligent design in a biology class to be no different than discussions of horoscopes, the zodiac, and tarot readings in an astronomy class. 




Makes me wonder about college admissions. Many, many years ago I read an article in the Sunday NYTimes that in any given society about 10-20% of the population is capable of true higher education. Most of our young need post-secondary education. The question could be : what is proper.




 

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 10:08PM #149
mountain_man
Posts: 40,651

Apr 6, 2012 -- 8:52PM, costrel wrote:

On the first day of my Astronomy 101 course, the professor made it very clear that this was an astronomy course, and we would not be discussing astrology, and those students who were expecting a course on horoscopes, star-crossed lovers, and the power and influence of the zodiac on human affairs should consider whether they really wanted to take this course.


Most that believe in the religion of astrology don't want that class. You  don't find those believing in "crystal power" in physics classes. You don't find "dowsers" in hydrology classes. They may start the class, but they don't stick around for long.


I see discussions of mythological-based and religious-based forms of creationism and intelligent design in a biology class to be no different than discussions of horoscopes, the zodiac, and tarot readings in an astronomy class.


Exactly! Teach the science, the facts, leave the religion out.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 10:11PM #150
mountain_man
Posts: 40,651

Apr 6, 2012 -- 9:18PM, jane2 wrote:

Makes me wonder about college admissions. Many, many years ago I read an article in the Sunday NYTimes that in any given society about 10-20% of the population is capable of true higher education. Most of our young need post-secondary education. The question could be : what is proper.


What is proper is for the us, via the government, to invest in our youth any provide any non religious education, college or trade school, for anyone that wants it.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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