Post Reply
Page 4 of 15  •  Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 15 Next
Switch to Forum Live View ADHD Overdiagnosed in Younger Kids
3 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2012 - 2:55PM #31
teilhard
Posts: 51,762

Yes ... And not every Pain requires a Pill; MANY temporary Discomforts resolve themselves naturally spontaneously; NOT every Departure from The Norm is a Pathological Condition that neeeds to be Mended; indeed, Change is Part of EVERY Human Life; ... We are ALL gonna die someday from something ...


Mar 9, 2012 -- 2:49PM, CharikIeia wrote:


Mar 9, 2012 -- 1:10PM, teilhard wrote:


This Problem of over-Diagnosis is Part, IMHO, of a broader and deeper Problem in Western Socety in general, i.e., The Medicalization of Ordinary Life, in which ANYTHING that departs significantly from The Norm is regarded as somehow "Pathology" that requires "Medication" ...



A related and in my view more important problem is the hysteria some people attach to medical nomenclature. Just because a medical name exists for a condition, doesn't mean Western Society is deteriorating when using it. Life means change. And it is not the smartest choice for everyone to suffer publicly like Pope John Paul did; a lot of suffering is avoidable by simple medical help. There is no prize to be won by refusing modernity.





Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2012 - 3:54PM #32
Erey
Posts: 19,142

Mar 9, 2012 -- 2:55PM, teilhard wrote:


Yes ... And not every Pain requires a Pill; MANY temporary Discomforts resolve themselves naturally spontaneously; NOT every Departure from The Norm is a Pathological Condition that neeeds to be Mended; indeed, Change is Part of EVERY Human Life; ... We are ALL gonna die someday from something ...


Mar 9, 2012 -- 2:49PM, CharikIeia wrote:


Mar 9, 2012 -- 1:10PM, teilhard wrote:


This Problem of over-Diagnosis is Part, IMHO, of a broader and deeper Problem in Western Socety in general, i.e., The Medicalization of Ordinary Life, in which ANYTHING that departs significantly from The Norm is regarded as somehow "Pathology" that requires "Medication" ...



A related and in my view more important problem is the hysteria some people attach to medical nomenclature. Just because a medical name exists for a condition, doesn't mean Western Society is deteriorating when using it. Life means change. And it is not the smartest choice for everyone to suffer publicly like Pope John Paul did; a lot of suffering is avoidable by simple medical help. There is no prize to be won by refusing modernity.








I agree with your point here Teilhard.  I have a few ancedotes.


I am from a family that are probably under-medicators.  I had to be half dead to go to the doctor when I was a girl.  When I was about 16 I had my wisdom teeth removed, which causes alot of pain and swelling.  I remember my mother drove me home from the surgeon and picked up my medications on the way home while I sat in the car.  Latter that day at the perscribed time my mother gave me a pain pill and then an hour latter I was having so much pain and told her to please, please give me more.  She hemed and hawed and after a time said, "OK but just this once".   And I was rather uncomfortable for a couple of days.  Once I started to move around a bit more I read the medicine bottle and the instructions read "Take one or two pills every 4 hours".  So I could have had two pills all along!  My mother was suspicious of pain pills evidentaly. 


Contrast this with my Mother in Law who has never seen a medical perscription she did not like.  She has had numerous surgeries, takes anything her doctors suggest she take.  My mother is older than her by about 8 years.  MIL is on about 11 different perscription medications but my mother just takes a little something for arthritis when she needs it.  My mother is highly active physicaly and almost every way.  My MIL cant get around very easily, doesnt travel, needs help to do things like change light bulbs, and has a handicap sign for her car.


Here is the sad thing about over-medication.  Again, because my MIL will take anything a doctor recomends in her 50's she was on this bone enhancing medication to prevent osteoperosis.  Before she started the medication she had good bone density, not perfect but in the very good range.  14 years latter she had lost all the minerals in her bones.  She had suffered several breaks and was getting tiny fractures along her spine which had to be filled with a surgical cement (another surgical type procedure).  The medication, esp when taken along with a anti-statin (to improve colestral level) will not at first but after so many years leach all the minerals out of the bones.  So my mother in law had medicaly induced osteoperosis.  She has never quite been the same since.


Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2012 - 5:15PM #33
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Mar 9, 2012 -- 2:49PM, CharikIeia wrote:


Mar 9, 2012 -- 1:10PM, teilhard wrote:


This Problem of over-Diagnosis is Part, IMHO, of a broader and deeper Problem in Western Socety in general, i.e., The Medicalization of Ordinary Life, in which ANYTHING that departs significantly from The Norm is regarded as somehow "Pathology" that requires "Medication" ...



A related and in my view more important problem is the hysteria some people attach to medical nomenclature. Just because a medical name exists for a condition, doesn't mean Western Society is deteriorating when using it. Life means change. And it is not the smartest choice for everyone to suffer publicly like Pope John Paul did; a lot of suffering is avoidable by simple medical help. There is no prize to be won by refusing modernity.




Most parents I've known fall into the "let us find out what is going on" unless children are in immediate danger.

Moderated by Merope on Apr 01, 2012 - 04:55PM
discuss catholicism
Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2012 - 7:07PM #34
teilhard
Posts: 51,762

Again, I think that The over-Medicalization of Ordinary Life is ONE Reason for over-Diagnosis ...

Moderated by Merope on Apr 01, 2012 - 04:58PM
Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2012 - 7:51PM #35
REteach
Posts: 14,993

100 years ago there were a lot of jobs available for people who didn't have to pay close attention to things.  There are not as many well-paying jobs available these days for people who can't concentrate, can't finish jobs they start, are disorganized, etc.  The world has made life more difficult for those who are not as mainstream.  


Computer games and TV are probably contributing to ADHD  


Regarding pain, there is increasing physiological evidence that chronic pain can rewire the central nervous system, which can lead to allodynia (which is pain with touch not typically considered painful).  The neurophysiology is explanatory.  Toughing it out is not necessarily the best option in this case. 


I sincerely hope those who are against ADHD meds are not the same folks who want me to write orders for antibiotics for viral infections.  


I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize what you heard was not what I meant...
Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2012 - 7:58PM #36
teilhard
Posts: 51,762

It's not a Question of being for-or-against Meds -- for Pain or for ADHD ...


The Question is over-Diagnosis ... and Meds for EVERYBODY for EVERYTHING ...


"Take these Pills ... "


Mar 9, 2012 -- 7:51PM, REteach wrote:


100 years ago there were a lot of jobs available for people who didn't have to pay close attention to things.  There are not as many well-paying jobs available these days for people who can't concentrate, can't finish jobs they start, are disorganized, etc.  The world has made life more difficult for those who are not as mainstream.  


Computer games and TV are probably contributing to ADHD  


Regarding pain, there is increasing physiological evidence that chronic pain can rewire the central nervous system, which can lead to allodynia (which is pain with touch not typically considered painful).  The neurophysiology is explanatory.  Toughing it out is not necessarily the best option in this case. 


I sincerely hope those who are against ADHD meds are not the same folks who want me to write orders for antibiotics for viral infections.  






Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Mar 10, 2012 - 12:01AM #37
Mlyons619
Posts: 16,572

Those thinking ADHD is a "bogus" condition might want to take a read of this article...

Moderated by Merope on Apr 01, 2012 - 05:01PM
"No freedom without education"
            --Thomas Jefferson

"NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition"
            -- Monty Python
Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Mar 10, 2012 - 1:52AM #38
teilhard
Posts: 51,762

No ... I'm sure that ADHD is anything BUT a "bogus Condition," but I do suspect that it is being over-Diagnosed ...


Mar 10, 2012 -- 12:01AM, Mlyons619 wrote:


Those thinking ADHD is a "bogus" condition might want to take a read of this article...




Moderated by Merope on Apr 01, 2012 - 05:02PM
Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Mar 10, 2012 - 2:15AM #39
Mlyons619
Posts: 16,572

What is the basis of these suspicions?


My experiences have been the opposite.  I see plenty of kids with the ADHD diagnosis, and 99.9% of them look to be correctly diagnosed.


Most of the few I thought MIS-diagnosed actually turned out to have more severe conditions -- like tourettes syndrome, obsessive-compulsive diasorder, or bipolar disorder.


Yes, there are fewer still who were "diagnosed" ADHD and were (IMHO) not ADHD at all, although their parents insisted they were beyond reason, and (for some strange reason) could never seem to produce the actual medical diagnosis paperwork (or even the name of the doctor making the diagnosis) that supported their claims.


The total number of the last type that I have run across in my years of teaching can counted on the first three fingers of my right hand...

"No freedom without education"
            --Thomas Jefferson

"NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition"
            -- Monty Python
Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Mar 10, 2012 - 4:18AM #40
Ebon
Posts: 10,148

Medicine (especially neurology and psychiatry) is one of those areas where everyone considers themselves an expert. And not simply an expert but the greatest of all experts. Law and education suffer from the same problem, the unjustified assumption that the uneducated opinion one just pulled out of one's behind is superior to the learned opinions of those who have devoted their lives to studying the area. I suspect this is an inherent flaw of democracies: The assumption that because your voice counts (which it does) that it should be given equal weight (which it should not). Yes, the experts in any area are sometimes wrong but they are a great deal more likely to be right than the random man in the street. This doesn't happen to other trained professionals. People don't walk up to engineers and say "you've put that bridge up wrong". Passersby do not accost farmers and tell them that they've put the wrong crop in a field. Only in medicine, education and law do people consider their uninformed and uneducated opinions are clearly correct and all who don't agree are clearly wrong.


One of the things I loathe about American society (and there are many things I like and admire about American society) is this streak of anti-intellectualism and instant expertise. The assumption that one opinion is just as good as another's facts; the discounting of actual evidence and data in favour of the gut feeling, the appeal to the knuckledragging prejudices of the common volk and the assumption that popularity equates to correctness.

He who oppresses the poor shows contempt for their Maker, but whoever is kind to the needy honors God. ~ Proverbs 14:31

Fiat justitia, ruat caelum

Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 4 of 15  •  Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 15 Next
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook