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Switch to Forum Live View ADHD Overdiagnosed in Younger Kids
3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 2:46AM #11
CharikIeia
Posts: 8,301

Mar 5, 2012 -- 6:43PM, teilhard wrote:


No ... Over-Diagnosis when a Diagnosis becomes "fashionable" is now an identifiable TREND ...



What to the layman appears as a "fashionable trend" typically is just the effect of professionals getting training and being able to identify the thing when they see it. Diffusion of innovations in a professional field. To the layman, it appears as if something that did not exist before suddenly becomes fashionable.


It is a usual reaction of conservatives in any given field (here medical) to brandmark scientific progress as a somehow misguided fashion wave.


Sure, with the ability to diagnose, also the possibility to misdiagnose arises. You cannot misdiagnose when you refuse to diagnose at all, after all. But also this hardly warrants the label "fashionable".

tl;dr
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 10:15AM #12
teilhard
Posts: 51,394

The Over-Diagnosis Trend is difficult to "Diagnose" with Clarity until later on (as with the Instances I listed in my Post) ...


Mar 6, 2012 -- 2:46AM, CharikIeia wrote:


Mar 5, 2012 -- 6:43PM, teilhard wrote:


No ... Over-Diagnosis when a Diagnosis becomes "fashionable" is now an identifiable TREND ...



What to the layman appears as a "fashionable trend" typically is just the effect of professionals getting training and being able to identify the thing when they see it. Diffusion of innovations in a professional field. To the layman, it appears as if something that did not exist before suddenly becomes fashionable.


It is a usual reaction of conservatives in any given field (here medical) to brandmark scientific progress as a somehow misguided fashion wave.


Sure, with the ability to diagnose, also the possibility to misdiagnose arises. You cannot misdiagnose when you refuse to diagnose at all, after all. But also this hardly warrants the label "fashionable".





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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 3:41PM #13
Erey
Posts: 18,940

I do think what Chari is saying about a surge in diagnosis is indicative of increased awareness and understanding of what they were previously unaware or uneducated. 


I do think given all that if a diagnosis does not make sense then don't just take the docs word for it.  Because, I do believe that the tendancy for a doc to sort of put a patient in a particular box or category is very high.  I don't say this angrily I think it is human nature, so if things are not working for you then you should keep looking and talk to different people.  I am very big on following gut-instincts. 


Speaking of over-diagnosis I am reminded of all of overwhelming increase in diagnosis on the autism spectrum.  I think more people are diagnosed on that spectrum today that would have been labeled weird or mentaly retarded or something else but autistic.  But even accounting for that experts are saying that only accounts for maybe 40% of the increase in diagnosis, there is something definately going on.



My brother early on was tracked with special needs.  While we were growing up the common diagnosis for people like him with no other recognizable source for his issues  was that he was a victim of not enough oxygen during the birthing process.  So for a long time this is what we were told.  He has a border-line IQ but is not mentaly retarded.  Now in the last year he has been diagnosed with Asbergers which is on the autism spectrum.  Being diagnosed as autistic seems  another catch-all diagnosis.    Personally I don't believe it matters if this is 100% correct or not as long as it gives people a fresh perspective and a guideline on how to deal with him (he can be difficult).  For a long time he has suffered from deteriorating relationships because he is so hard to be around sometimes.  So if this gives those of us in his life a new set of guidelines I am all for it. 




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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 5:08PM #14
mindis1
Posts: 7,915

Mar 5, 2012 -- 10:32PM, REteach wrote:


ADHD is a neurotransmitter problem.  



Then why isn’t ADHD defined and diagnosed on the basis of objective measurements of this “neurotransmitter problem”? I assume that you would consider it unscientific and malpractice for a doctor to diagnose and order treatment for, say, diabetes purely on the basis of an interview, right?


What exactly is this “neurotransmitter problem”?  


And where is the evidence that amphetamines correct this “neurotransmitter problem”?


Maybe people smoking crack are just correcting their “neurotransmitter problem”?

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 8:45PM #15
REteach
Posts: 14,790

Mar 5, 2012 -- 10:47PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 5, 2012 -- 10:32PM, REteach wrote:


ADHD is a neurotransmitter problem.  Just because not everyone on stimulants has ADHD does not mean that ADHD is not real. Some genes have actually been identified.  



sheesh. 




This isn't news, RE.




Not, apparently, for the educated. Clearly, there are others. 

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize what you heard was not what I meant...
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 8:47PM #16
REteach
Posts: 14,790

Mar 5, 2012 -- 11:16PM, mountain_man wrote:


Mar 5, 2012 -- 10:32PM, REteach wrote:

ADHD is a neurotransmitter problem.  Just because not everyone on stimulants has ADHD does not mean that ADHD is not real. Some genes have actually been identified.


No one here has said otherwise. Why argue about something no one has said?




From the OP: Anyone else really just think that most ADHD cases are bogus anyway?


Am I misunderstanding "most ADHD cases are bogus anyway"?

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize what you heard was not what I meant...
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 9:12PM #17
farragut
Posts: 4,042

 "most ADHD cases are bogus anyway"?


 


We are trying to learn. My 6yo grand-daughter is at peril of being so branded when, perhaps she suffers only from lack of structure. I do not yet know, but am deeply concerned.

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 9:35PM #18
Abner1
Posts: 6,403

Many years ago I had a student in basic chemistry who was obviously quite bright but completely unfocused, with the result that he ended up with a C.  We're not allowed to bring up medical issues with students, but can discuss them if the student brings them up.  He came to me during office hours and asked if I could give him any advice on how to do better in future classes.


"Yes, go get yourself checked out for ADHD."


"But I don't have ADHD."


"Want to bet?"  I then explained the symptoms to him, he went to a specialist doctor, and ended up on medication.  It turned his life around - he went from grades ranging from B's to D's to being a straight A student, then went to medical school and became a doctor.  He sent me a copy of his first research paper along with a note saying that without my advice, it never would have gotten written.


Is ADHD overdiagnosed?  Almost certainly ...  Most of the people I've seen who supposedly had ADHD were (as far as I could tell) normal teens being medicated for typical teen problems having nothing to do with any medical disorder.  But ADHD does exist, people who have seen enough cases of it can tell it from normal teen behavior, and proper medication can address it in ways that can drastically improve their lives.


It's a shame when a medical condition being "faddish" results in so many false cases that the real cases start getting doubted.

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 9:42PM #19
mountain_man
Posts: 39,676

Mar 6, 2012 -- 9:12PM, farragut wrote:

We are trying to learn. My 6yo grand-daughter is at peril of being so branded when, perhaps she suffers only from lack of structure. I do not yet know, but am deeply concerned.


I would be deeply concerned about anyone other than a trained neurologist that specialized in this area making any kind of diagnosis. I'd be deeply concerned about anyone that pushes drugs on a 6 year old.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 9:49PM #20
farragut
Posts: 4,042

Thanks, Ab and Dave, I appreciate your understanding.

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