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2 years ago  ::  Feb 05, 2012 - 10:57AM #1
Marcion
Posts: 2,883
I have boycotted the movie Gray because it portrays wolves as yellow-eyed mankillers. Nothing can be further from the truth; wolf attacks on humans are very rare.

Why didn't they use Grizlly Bears, afetr all that is realistic. 
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2 years ago  ::  Feb 14, 2012 - 11:32AM #2
costrel
Posts: 6,216

Feb 5, 2012 -- 10:57AM, Marcion wrote:

I have boycotted the movie Gray because it portrays wolves as yellow-eyed mankillers. Nothing can be further from the truth; wolf attacks on humans are very rare.

Why didn't they use Grizlly Bears, afetr all that is realistic. 


I did see the film, though I knew nothing about it when I went to see it; I just wanted to see a film one Sunday and it sounded good. One of the major problems with the representation of wolves is that the audience is never sure whether the wolves are ordinary wolves, Godzilla-like monster wolves, ghosts, or werewolves (in other words, are the wolves supposed to be supernatural or natural?). The film after all is based on a short story entitled "The Ghost Walker," which seems to imply that the wolves are supernatural.


The beginning of the film presents the hero as a wolf-killer, since in the film wolves routinely attack the oil workers. But when we later see the wolves up close, they appear to be about the size of cows or horses -- in other words, much larger than regular wolves. The wolves also growl in unrealistic, "monster-like" ways. After one of the plane crash survivors is bitten by one of the wolves, the survivors talk about whether werewolves are real. And near the end of the film (in a highly unrealistic scene where the humans jump across a cliff and climb down a huge tree) the wolves appear to be able to teleport, as they somehow reach the bottom of the cliff before the humans do. It also seemed uncertain to me whether the large black wolf that appears near the end of the film is different than, or the same as, the large black wolf that is killed by the other wolves earlier in the film. (If he's the same wolf, did he come back from the dead? Or is he a ghost? And yes, I did watch the second ending to the film after the end credits, and I found that to be ultimately unhelpful in explaining the nature of the wolves.) Finally, the wolf den is not a den under ground, but a large open killing field above ground filled with skeletons.


So to me, one of the major flaws of the film is that I could never tell if the wolves were supposed to be supernatural wolves (Godzilla-like monsters, or werewolves, or even ghosts) or if the writers and directors were employing highly unscientific and fictional stereotypes of wolves for horrific and suspenseful effects. In other words, I could not tell if this film is supposed to be a fantasy film about supernatural wolves and/or werewolves like the Underworld and Twilight sagas, or if this film is supposed to be a horror film with a wilderness setting. 

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