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2 years ago  ::  Dec 26, 2011 - 7:50AM #21
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849

Dec 25, 2011 -- 10:22PM, solfeggio wrote:


So, is it cold and snowy where some of you are in North America?  You've undoubtedly had a white Christmas.  Of couse, in the South it would be different.


Today, the day after Christmas here in the North Island of NZ, it is hot and sunny, about 24 degrees Celsius, with clear blue skies and warm breezes.  The tuis are singing in the Pohutukawa trees, and people are cutting their grass or preparing for barbecues.


Kids have a school holiday until February, and people will be going up to spend a week at their baches which are usually situated on the beach.





Just wondering, given Christmas occurs in summer in NZ, what do various Christmas cards depict?  Here I see many with snowy scenes or Santa in heavy red clothes (no doubt so he can brave the cold).  That wouldn't make much sense in NZ-yes?


And having Christmas over the school holiday makes great sense to me!


 


Irene.

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2 years ago  ::  Dec 27, 2011 - 4:23PM #22
solfeggio
Posts: 8,523

Hi, Irene -


As elsewhere in the world, Christmas is a big deal here and, weird as it may seem, the Christmas cards in the shops are the same sort as you would find in the States, with snow scenes and Santas, etc. 


Although years ago he was known as Father Christmas, the American influence is so strong nowadays that Father Christmas is long gone and the man in the red suit is Santa Claus.  And during December he can be found in the local malls, sitting on a throne, ready to have the kids sit on his lap and tell them what they want for Christmas.


Since it is customery for people to open their gifts on the morning of Christmas day, Christmas Eve is just another day and not a holiday.  We do have a two-day holiday, though, with the day after Christmas, Boxing Day, included in the celebrations.  If these days fall on a week-end, then people get two week days off.


School holidays run from early December until the first of February. 

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2 years ago  ::  Dec 27, 2011 - 5:23PM #23
jane2
Posts: 14,287

My home city in the mid-Hudson valley was originally settled by the Dutch. In public elementary school I learned that Santa Claus was a shortened version of Santa Nicolaus, St. Nicholas. We also learned that St. Nicholas,  Father Christmas, visited many European children on Dec. 6, the feast day of St. Nicholas on the Christian calendar.


 

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2 years ago  ::  Dec 27, 2011 - 6:21PM #24
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849

Dec 27, 2011 -- 4:23PM, solfeggio wrote:


Hi, Irene -


As elsewhere in the world, Christmas is a big deal here and, weird as it may seem, the Christmas cards in the shops are the same sort as you would find in the States, with snow scenes and Santas, etc. 


Although years ago he was known as Father Christmas, the American influence is so strong nowadays that Father Christmas is long gone and the man in the red suit is Santa Claus.  And during December he can be found in the local malls, sitting on a throne, ready to have the kids sit on his lap and tell them what they want for Christmas.


Since it is customery for people to open their gifts on the morning of Christmas day, Christmas Eve is just another day and not a holiday.  We do have a two-day holiday, though, with the day after Christmas, Boxing Day, included in the celebrations.  If these days fall on a week-end, then people get two week days off.


School holidays run from early December until the first of February. 






Thanks for replying.  I’m a little embarrassed that American version of Santa Claus seems to be the dominant theme for folks where Christmas is essentially a summer holiday.  We're getting the two days off for Christmas-day of and day before.  Boxing Day not much of an event here. More like "Return of the Gifts" day here. Wink   


 


My bro is moving to South Africa next year so I’ll find out what passes for Santa Claus etc. on that part of the world.


 


Irene.

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2 years ago  ::  Dec 27, 2011 - 7:18PM #25
jane2
Posts: 14,287

Dec 27, 2011 -- 6:21PM, IreneAdler wrote:


Dec 27, 2011 -- 4:23PM, solfeggio wrote:


Hi, Irene -


As elsewhere in the world, Christmas is a big deal here and, weird as it may seem, the Christmas cards in the shops are the same sort as you would find in the States, with snow scenes and Santas, etc. 


Although years ago he was known as Father Christmas, the American influence is so strong nowadays that Father Christmas is long gone and the man in the red suit is Santa Claus.  And during December he can be found in the local malls, sitting on a throne, ready to have the kids sit on his lap and tell them what they want for Christmas.


Since it is customery for people to open their gifts on the morning of Christmas day, Christmas Eve is just another day and not a holiday.  We do have a two-day holiday, though, with the day after Christmas, Boxing Day, included in the celebrations.  If these days fall on a week-end, then people get two week days off.


School holidays run from early December until the first of February. 






Thanks for replying.  I’m a little embarrassed that American version of Santa Claus seems to be the dominant theme for folks where Christmas is essentially a summer holiday.  We're getting the two days off for Christmas-day of and day before.  Boxing Day not much of an event here. More like "Return of the Gifts" day here. Wink   


 


My bro is moving to South Africa next year so I’ll find out what passes for Santa Claus etc. on that part of the world.


 


Irene.




Well, Irene


St. Nicholas and his feast day, Dec. 6, were long celebrated in Northern Europe. As Americans we are an amalgam of peoples.


My family and I spent two Xmases in Southeast Asia. Pointsettias are native to Thailand and proliferate. Thailand is Buddhist but those who know Americans are interested our celebrations as we Americans were in theirs. Thai friends loved our home movies of snow and tobaggans.


We have little snow here in north Georgia, but it is a hoot when we do. When the forecast comes all the milk, bread, and eggs disappear from the markets. Then we all stay home until the snow and ice melt...........................




 

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2 years ago  ::  Dec 28, 2011 - 1:35PM #26
hopebringer
Posts: 1,872

We had a green Christmas in up-state New York this year and I liked it .  It made travelling so much easier  :)  

Challenge is a dragon with a gift in its mouth. Tame the dragon and the gift is yours. ~ Noela Evans
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2 years ago  ::  Dec 28, 2011 - 2:12PM #27
crazeknot
Posts: 3

I hope everone had a " Merry Christmas "!!! I spent a very peaceful & quite Christmas.


 I'm currently living w/ my daughter & her kids. They r a noisy lot. They went over to her mother in laws, for the day. Some of my friend stop by & we had very lovely time. They all came bearing gift & a feast. Could not of had a more wonderful time. I hope everyone has a  " Wonderful & Safe New Years !!! Peace-Out Linda

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2 years ago  ::  Dec 28, 2011 - 2:18PM #28
Merope
Posts: 8,780

Dec 24, 2011 -- 11:44AM, TPaine wrote:


The same to you, Rocky. May everything be peaceful in Frostbite Falls, and may Boris Badenov and Natasha Fatale leave you alone during the holiday season. Please pass these wishes on to Bullwinkle for me.



LOL!  "Don't make it worse ... it's Badenov" Tongue Out

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