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Switch to Forum Live View Possible convert, just a few sticking points.
4 years ago  ::  Jun 02, 2010 - 11:56AM #1
Coronis
Posts: 21

I think Islam is a beautiful religion, but there are some aspects that have kept me from feeling like its truly right for me. I always felt like if I converted, I would have to follow all the myriad rules to the letter while someone born into it has the freedom to interpret. Now I'm starting to question that assumption. So here are some questions and thoughts I have:


1) Women and hijab: I would have no problem wearing a head covering to a mosque or a group service or celibration, but I wouldn't feel comfortable doing it everyday. None of my current friendes, coworkers or family members wear it, so I feel it would be like "look at me! look how Muslim I am!" which is not the point of being modest, I think. I'm also told there is nothing in the Quran requiring it specifically, it only requires that we dress modestly - which is how I prefer to dress anyways. I'm well-endowed with a feminine figure which sometimes makes it hard to find clothes that don't cling to my chest, but I put in the extra effort to not look cheap. Is that enough?


2) Women and Menstruation: I have read that during her period, a woman cannot pray, fast, or (from some, but not all sources I've heard this) touch or read aloud from the Quran, because she is "unclean". Some have said that it is because of the physical hardship of menstruation (cramps, fatigue, etc.) that a woman should take a break from prayer and fasts. I totally support that, as anyone with bad cramps would much rather lie in bed then do anything, and fasting can even be dangerous with the iron deficiency some women experience during menstruation. But then why can't she touch a Quran, or even speak its words aloud? Why can't she pray when the PMS subsides but she's still bleeding? The only part in the Quran that I've read about this seems to only forbid that a man and wife have vaginal intercourse during this time - fine by me! But the other rules only seem to marginalize women, to pull them away from God. Is this part of the true Islam, or just what centuries of sexism has done to the religion? What and where (specifically) does the Quran say on this matter?


I have many more questions, but I'm out of time now. I'll start with these and add more as they occur to me. I am looking forward to your opinions, but more so if you can back them up with Quranic references. Thank you all for your time and thought.


 

Moderated by Merope on Jun 27, 2010 - 01:08AM
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4 years ago  ::  Jun 03, 2010 - 12:43PM #2
Ceren
Posts: 1,430

Hello Coronis!


Here are my thoughts:


1) Women and hijab: traditionally, scholars have said that the covering of the hair is obligatory. However, I think there is increasingly a movement of people who question this idea and believe that in certain societies it might not be obligatory.


In fact, I was recently shocked when I heard a Muslim scholar from Zaytuna (maliki fiqh) saying that maybe in these countries the issue of hijab should be reanalyzed. People went crazy (esp. hijab-wearing women) and so they said that that was changing rulings and then he said "then why aren't you all wearing niqab?"  There was a silence after that...


Modesty is one of the many many things that are part of being a Muslim. You, with time, reading, consulting and ESP. PRAYING, will have to figure out what you want and what makes you feel comfortable.  Each Muslim has a different modesty standard and you'll have to figure yours.


There is nothing in the Quran or even in the sahih narrations of the prophet where the prophet commanded women to cover their heads btw.


2) Women and menstruation: during your menstruation you don't do your obligatory prayer (salah) but that doesn't mean you can't pray! You can pray in all kinds of different ways which is actually nice because you get a "break" from the ritualized ("rigid") prayer form and can be more spontaneous.


Regarding the Quran, there is a difference of opinion. Some jurists believe she is not allowed to touch it and recite it, others believe she is allowed.


 


 



 But the other rules only seem to marginalize women, to pull them away from God. Is this part of the true Islam, or just what centuries of sexism has done to the religion? What and where (specifically) does the Quran say on this matter?





There is one thing that you will learn soon and that is that Islamic jurisprudence is not derived only from the Quran but both from the Quran and statements of the prophet. So just because something it's not in the Quran does not mean that XYZ is obligatory or not, forbidden or not.


Besides that, there is also the point that jurists are human beings and obviously were alive at a certain time, with a certain culture, etc, etc. And it's obvious that they can't escape that fact, and we can't escape it either.


Jurisprudence was something very alive up till colonial (and post-colonial) times so at present time there are very very few scholars with enough both religious and socio-political knowledge who are able to do fiqh and advance the knowledge of their madhab (their school), or even to create another madhab. So... in that sense we're pretty much stuck and I think we'll be stuck until Jesus comes again and applies sharia the way it should be.


All the best,


Ceren

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 03, 2010 - 12:56PM #3
Abdullah.
Posts: 882

Salaam Sister Coronis!; welcome!Smile


As a 'born Muslim' and a practicing Muslim [albeit a terrible one at that! Embarassed] for about 20 years now sister ..., allow me to share some of the things i have learnt sister about Islam


First i will tell you sister that along with the Quran, it's interpretation has been revealed too to the prophet [saw] and he explained it to us, thus sister allthough there is aspects of the Quran from which the layperson can get a lesson from just reading the Quran or it's translations, but this is just of the simple realites sister and the acedemic subjects in the Quran, such as doctrinal issues and imperatives of the Islamic law, etc, does need an expert contextual interpretation, thus it is not enough for us laymen just to derive the guidance ourselves from the Quran, or it's translations.


And from the interpretation of the Quran sister we know that the obligation of hijab has been decicively established; in fact it is so decicive that there has never been a difference of opinion on it and the Scholars of past and presesnt have allways been unanimous on it, thus any newcomer to Islam has to at least accept it's obligation and that to not wear it in public [for women ofcourse] will be a sin; however an exception is given to new converts to get used to it first before they wear it on a regular basis, thus you can avail of this exception


From what I have seen of the evidences of this sister is that, denial of it's obligation may take a person out of the folds of Islam alltogether, thus it will be very important for you to at least accept it's obligation, wether you wear it or not, for then that will safe-guard your imaan [faith], and at least make you remain a Muslim, and thus not let your good deeds go to waste


i will present you the evidences sister at the end of this post


regarding menstruation; the reason why women are not allowed to touch Quran or pray in that state is due to their bodies not being totally clean during it, which is a neccessity to pray; you would probably know that Muslims have to be bodily clean and not only that but they have to be in the state of a minor ablution too to offer the formal prayer or touch the Holy Quran sister, thus how can it be that a woman can do those things when her body is in the state of major impurity?; the pleasure of ALlah and worshipping him and getting close to Him is in obeying His commandments sister, thus when you dont pray or touch the Quran in a menstrual state [untill your periods have stopped and you have bathed thereafter], this is infact worshipping ALlah too sister for it is obeying him and respecting His Quran, thus this will be a means to get closer to him too and ofcourse during then you can offer lots of zikr [uttering of praises] and supplicate to Him


not sure of wether there is a difference of opinion in reading the Quran loudly without touhing it during a woman periods...; there well maybe; i'll see if i can find you a fatwa about it sister, but apart from a few liberals like miraj Laughing, you wont find any muslims saying that a woman can pray [offer the salaat] or touch the Quran in that state


hope this helps sister


Salaam!


here is a link where the deciciveness of the hijab obligation is explained:


qa.sunnipath.com/issue_view.asp?HD=1&ID=...


And from the following link the extremely detrimental effect [possibly even to the extent of taking one out of islam Surprised] of not considering hijab an obligation, can be inferred:


qa.sunnipath.com/issue_view.asp?HD=1&ID=...


Also the following bit of evidence corraborates this view:


“Disbelief” includes:


(2) denying any matter necessarily known to be of the religion of Islam, that is established by a text from either the Holy Qur’an or mutawatir[4] hadith, provided the text is incontestable as evidence[5] and there is no pretext (shubha) for disagreement about it;[6]


(3) denying any matter established by unanimous consensus of all the prophetic Companions (Sahaba), provided it its unanimity is unquestionably established, and it was explicitly stated by all, not merely tacitly agreed to;


shadhilitariqa.com/site/index.php?option...


And here are some links on the womans menses issue [one of those links confirm that Quran can be recited loudly during womens periods; but not touching ofcourse] :


qa.sunnipath.com/issue_view.asp?HD=1&ID=...


qa.sunnipath.com/issue_view.asp?HD=1&ID=...


ps; regarding seeming as though you are being all showy by wearing hijab; i use to think similarly about my beard sister when i first decided to grow it as a 19 year old, but i thought that my ALlah knows wether i'm keeping it for Him or wether i want to show off with it, so i went ahead and kept it; sometimes sister, in order to adhere to ALlah's guidance, one has to have the attitude of 'i couldn't care less about what people think, as long as i'm ok with my ALlah'Smile , thus i think this sort of mind set will do you a great favour here too regarding hijab!


ps: i'm not really that religious; just bearly trying to stick to the obligations..., but as the beard is considered mandatory [wajib] in the school of thought i follow, this is why i have it, as it's very neccessary to refrain from sin at least sister, despite what our qualms may be

Moderated by Merope on Jun 27, 2010 - 01:27AM
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4 years ago  ::  Jun 03, 2010 - 8:28PM #4
Miraj
Posts: 5,023

I'm a born Arab Muslima of nearly 60 years, so I don't have the dilemma of trying to determine what I must do to be "Muslim enough".  I not only question, I study plenty. 


I don't cover my hair.  Modesty and piety aren't defined by having a cloth on your head.  As Sister Ceren stated, there is no command from Allah to cover your hair.  In fact, it wasn't determined that head covering is "obligatory" until about 200 years after the death of the Prophet (pbuh). 


There is an ebb and flow to the insistance that Muslim women cover their hair that tends to follow political movements in predominant Muslim countries.  We don't generally have that pressure in the US, except through stereotyping of Muslim women as exotic and foreign.


There's always somebody (usually a male) around to insist that you must cover your hair, although that has long been a debatable point of view.


Salaam

Disclaimer: The opinions of this member are not primarily informed by western ethnocentric paradigms, stereotypes rooted in anti-Muslim/Islam hysteria, "Israel can do no wrong" intransigence, or the perceived need to protect the Judeo-Christian world from invading foreign religions and legal concepts.  By expressing such views, no inherent attempt is being made to derail or hijack threads, but that may be the result.  The result is not the responsibility of this member.


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4 years ago  ::  Jun 05, 2010 - 2:43AM #5
Coronis
Posts: 21

Thank you all so much for your perspectives... I have to admit this has been a hard one for me to research without getting bogged down in politics. And I'm afraid I'm still not sure how I feel about these issues. I'm glad that Muslim converts are given a little time to adjust to all the lifestyle changes. Thanks, Abdullah, for reassuring me about the "showy" issue. I think I'm going to tackle some of the more basic stuff first, but first some of my own thoughts...


Jun 3, 2010 -- 12:56PM, Abdullah. wrote:


And from the interpretation of the Quran sister we know that the obligation of hijab has been decicively established; in fact it is so decicive that there has never been a difference of opinion on it ...





Abdullah, I deeply appreciate all the time and thought you've put in to answering my many questions, but I must respectfully disagree here. I've only been researching a short while, true, but I have yet to see a consensus on this of all issues. Although most Muslim scholars do seem to agree that some covering must be worn, there doesn't seem to be any consensus on how or what kind of cover. If I wore a simple scarf covering most of my hair and neck, some would say I'm a good Muslim, but some would say I was bad if I didn't cover all but one eye! I'm trying to figure out if there is a point where religion and the cultural/ethnic traditions separate, and it seems the line is blurry at best. I admit I have read only a little of the Quran and far less of the collections of Hadith, but here's what I've dug up:


The Quran states: 


              Say to the believing men that they should lower their gaze and guard their 
              modesty...And say to the believing women that they should lower their 
              gaze and guard their modesty; that they should not display their beauty 
              and adornments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they 
              should draw their veils over their bosoms and not display their beauty 
              except to their husbands, their fathers..." (etc.)


or another translation:


Tell the believing men to lower their gaze and keep covered their private parts, for that is purer for them.... And tell the believing woman to keep covered their private parts, and that they should not reveal their beauty except what is apparent... (etc.)


[Chapter 24, verses 30-31]


So unless "beauty and adornments" is a euphemism for specific body parts, I don't see a lot of specific dress-code here, and in my modest research it would seem than many scholars have different views. If beauty refers to "lady-parts" then that is fine by me, I'm not much for exhibition, but who decided a guys' nipple area isn't private? Frankly, I've had a few sightings of topless men I could've gone my whole life without. And parts that must ordinarily appear.... well, wouldn't that depend on the activity, the weather, the geography, the society you live in?


I'm not saying who's wrong or right, just that there are A LOT of different thoughts out there... and as I said before, I just don't know what to think. So I'm going to take your advice, Ceren, and try to pray and hope wisdom finds me. Thanks again to everyone, Abdullah, Miraj and Ceren, for all your help!

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 05, 2010 - 6:58AM #6
Abdullah.
Posts: 882

Jun 5, 2010 -- 2:43AM, Coronis wrote:


Thank you all so much for your perspectives... I have to admit this has been a hard one for me to research without getting bogged down in politics. And I'm afraid I'm still not sure how I feel about these issues. I'm glad that Muslim converts are given a little time to adjust to all the lifestyle changes. Thanks, Abdullah, for reassuring me about the "showy" issue. I think I'm going to tackle some of the more basic stuff first, but first some of my own thoughts...


Jun 3, 2010 -- 12:56PM, Abdullah. wrote:


And from the interpretation of the Quran sister we know that the obligation of hijab has been decicively established; in fact it is so decicive that there has never been a difference of opinion on it ...




Abdullah, I deeply appreciate all the time and thought you've put in to answering my many questions, but I must respectfully disagree here. I've only been researching a short while, true, but I have yet to see a consensus on this of all issues. Although most Muslim scholars do seem to agree that some covering must be worn, there doesn't seem to be any consensus on how or what kind of cover. If I wore a simple scarf covering most of my hair and neck, some would say I'm a good Muslim, but some would say I was bad if I didn't cover all but one eye! I'm trying to figure out if there is a point where religion and the cultural/ethnic traditions separate, and it seems the line is blurry at best. I admit I have read only a little of the Quran and far less of the collections of Hadith, but here's what I've dug up:


The Quran states:


Say to the believing men that they should lower their gaze and guard their
modesty...And say to the believing women that they should lower their
gaze and guard their modesty; that they should not display their beauty
and adornments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they
should draw their veils over their bosoms and not display their beauty
except to their husbands, their fathers..." (etc.)


or another translation:


Tell the believing men to lower their gaze and keep covered their private parts, for that is purer for them.... And tell the believing woman to keep covered their private parts, and that they should not reveal their beauty except what is apparent... (etc.)


[Chapter 24, verses 30-31]


So unless "beauty and adornments" is a euphemism for specific body parts, I don't see a lot of specific dress-code here, and in my modest research it would seem than many scholars have different views. If beauty refers to "lady-parts" then that is fine by me, I'm not much for exhibition, but who decided a guys' nipple area isn't private? Frankly, I've had a few sightings of topless men I could've gone my whole life without. And parts that must ordinarily appear.... well, wouldn't that depend on the activity, the weather, the geography, the society you live in?


I'm not saying who's wrong or right, just that there are A LOT of different thoughts out there... and as I said before, I just don't know what to think. So I'm going to take your advice, Ceren, and try to pray and hope wisdom finds me. Thanks again to everyone, Abdullah, Miraj and Ceren, for all your help!




Salam Sister,


I know the consensus issue here can be a bit confusing sister as we indeed see many muslims disagreeing on the definition of hijab, etc; AlHamdulillah shaykh Nuh keller has explained this issue in detail, and inshALlah this will explain the apperant anamoly of it:


The Quranic verse, Say to believing women, that they cast down their eyes and guard their private parts, and reveal not their adornment save such as is outward; and let them drape their headcoverings over their bosoms, and not reveal their adornment . . . (Quran 24:31) is a specific requirement for Muslim women to cover their hair.


The word headcoverings (Ar. singular khimar, plural khumur), more familiar in our times as the hijab, is a word of well-known signification among scholars of Arabic, at their forefront the authors of the classical lexical reference dictionaries like Zabidis encyclopedic Taj al-arus or Mutarrizis al-Mughrib, both of which define khimar as a woman’s headcovering; or Fayumis al-Misbah or Fayruzabadis al-Qamus, which both define it as “a cloth with which a woman covers her head.” The Taj al-arus also notes that a man's turban is sometimes referred to as a khimar “because a man covers his head with it in like manner as a woman covers her head with her khimar when he disposes it in the Arab manner, turning part of it under the jaws nearly in the same manner in which a woman disposes her khimar.” These authorities are cited in the eight-volume Arabic-English Lexicon of Edward William Lane, who describes the khimar as “a woman’s muffler or veil with which she covers her head and the lower part of her face.”


There is no other lexical sense in which the word khimar may be construed. The wording of the command, however, “and let them drape their headcoverings over their bosoms,” sometimes confuses nonspecialists in the sciences of the Quran, and in truth, interpreting the Quran does sometimes require in-depth knowledge of the historical circumstances in which the various verses were revealed. In this instance, the elliptical form of the divine command is because women at the time of the revelation wore their headcovers tied back behind their necks, as some village women still do in Muslim countries, leaving the front of the neck bare, as well as the opening (Ar. singular jayb, plural juyub, translated as “bosoms” in the above verse) at the top of the dress. The Islamic revelation confirmed the practice of covering the head, understood from the use of the word khimar in the verse, but also explained that the custom of the time was not sufficient and that women were henceforth to tie the headcover in front and let it drape down to conceal the throat and the dress’s opening at the top.


This is why Muslim women cover their heads: because the Quran unambiguously orders them to, and there is no qualifying text or hadith or even other lexical possibility to show that the Quranic order might mean anything besides obligation. Rather, the hadiths all bear this meaning out, Muslim scholars are in unanimous agreement about it and have been from the time of the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) down to our own day, and it is even known by all non-Muslim peoples about them.


There was thus nothing new or surprising in the Islamic legal opinion promulgated in December 2003 by the Grand Mufti of Egypt, Sheikh Ali Jumua of the Egyptian Fatwa Authority (Dar al-Ifta al-Misriyya) that the hijab is an obligation on all Muslim female adults, as firmly established in the Holy Qu�an and the Prophet Muhammad’s hadiths, as well as unanimously agreed upon by Muslim scholars. He pointed out that unlike the cross sometimes worn by Christians, or the skullcap worn by Jews, the hijab is not a “symbol” of Islam but rather that “Islam orders female adults to wear hijab as obligatory religious clothing.” It is part of every Muslim woman’s religious practice.


Some ink and words have been spent by some contemporary ethnic Muslim women writers (and an occasional convert) trying to do away with the covering of hair mandated by the Quran and the unanimous consensus of Muslims. They say accurately enough, for a Muslim does not leave Islam merely by committing a sin that one can take off the hijab and still remain a Muslim. But such a person remains a bad Muslim, who deems aping non-Muslims better than practicing Islam. For what? The Supreme Being knows our benefit better than we do; and if one believes in Allah, Master of every atom in the universe, it is only plain sense to follow Him. When all else fails, read the directions. Those who refuse to wear the hijab are acting out of ignorance or bad faith, and when one meets them, one seldom finds they manage to practice the other aspects of their religion. In the end, it is a matter of hearts. The heart that is alive has a sense of eternity, and knows that the infinite is greater than the finite. The heart that is dead follows the trends of the trend makers because it has turned its back on the Divine and forgotten endless time.


qa.sunnipath.com/issue_view.asp?HD=1&ID=...


And I think there may be a difference of opinion on covering the face sister; [if my memmory is correct] the hanafi school of thought originally did not consider it neccessary to cover the face, but they do so now due to the risen level of fitnah [sexual disorder/immorality]; however given the islamaphobic times in the West, women are given an exception not to wear it if they fear danger.


covering of the face falls under the 'niqab' issue sister; and allthough hijab and niqab are related, yet they can be two seperate issues; thus the consensus is on the hijab and maybe not neccessrily on the niqab


hope this helps


Salam

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 05, 2010 - 1:18PM #7
Ceren
Posts: 1,430

Assalamu `alaykum,


Jun 5, 2010 -- 6:58AM, Abdullah. wrote:


And from the interpretation of the Quran sister we know that the obligation of hijab has been decicively established; in fact it is so decicive that there has never been a difference of opinion on it ...




You simply don't know that, and no one can know that. For sure that there are current (and not so current) scholarly opinions that hijab is not obligatory.


And based on old writings, like Ibn Battuta's journals, or even old paintings, we can see that not every Muslim woman in the past wore hijab.


Jun 5, 2010 -- 6:58AM, Abdullah. wrote:

This is why Muslim women cover their heads: because the Qur�an unambiguously orders them to, and there is no qualifying text or hadith or even other lexical possibility to show that the Qur�anic order might mean anything besides obligation. Rather, the hadiths all bear this meaning out, Muslim scholars are in unanimous agreement about it and have been from the time of the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) down to our own day, and it is even known by all non-Muslim peoples about them.



The Quran orders women to cover their bossom and the bossom is clearly not in one's head. In pre-islamic arabia, bothe mena and women used a headcovering (they still do) and thus the Quran borrowed from something that was common at the time to issue the command to cover the hair.


The Quran, when ordering the men to prepare for battle, orders to prepare horses. I do not know of one single person who would interpret those verse of Quran to mean that using horses in battle is obligatory. Rather, they would say that the Quran borrows from that time's warfare to command to prepare for battle.


 


Jun 5, 2010 -- 6:58AM, Abdullah. wrote:

There was thus nothing new or surprising in the Islamic legal opinion promulgated in December 2003 by the Grand Mufti of Egypt, Sheikh �Ali Jumu�a of the Egyptian Fatwa Authority (Dar al-Ifta� al-Misriyya) that �the hijab is an obligation on all Muslim female adults, as firmly established in the Holy Qur�an and the Prophet Muhammad�s hadiths, as well as unanimously agreed upon by Muslim scholars.� He pointed out that unlike the cross sometimes worn by Christians, or the skullcap worn by Jews, the hijab is not a �symbol� of Islam but rather that �Islam orders female adults to wear hijab as obligatory religious clothing.� It is part of every Muslim woman�s religious practice.



Well... he's the one that also said that drinking the prophet's urine was such a great thing...


I don't think I could possibly face my Lord and say with a straight face that I blindly followed the command of ancestors and other men, even though I was convinced otherwise (btw, this applies for both cases when one believes hijab is obligatory and when one believes it isn't).


I have gone through non-hijab and hijab periods and although I don't have a strong opinion either way, I am indeed sick and tired of the veiled takfir threats and promises of hell and the idea that I have worship scholars and do as they say. Great scholars have made mistakes, and great scholars have given opinions that were correct at the time but are no longer appropriate.


If anything, as a Muslim woman I'd rather for now concentrate on establishing the 5 pillars properly both in practice and in my heart.


All the best,


Ceren

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 06, 2010 - 12:04PM #8
Miraj
Posts: 5,023

I think Islam is a beautiful religion, but there are some aspects that have kept me from feeling like its truly right for me. I always felt like if I converted, I would have to follow all the myriad rules to the letter while someone born into it has the freedom to interpret. Now I'm starting to question that assumption.


Dear Coronis,


Keep the attitude embodied in your opening statement, and you will do well.  Islam is much easier and far more rational and reasonable than many Muslims will exemplify.  I am a scholar myself, but in the manner of one trying to overcome the growing tendency toward blind following in the West.  I encourage Muslims to educate themselves using not only reason, but cultural appropriateness to evaluate traditions that rose from far more rigid societies that haven't done justice to our great faith.


Islam is intended to bring us closer to God by giving us the opportunity to have a personal relationship with him.  What the reliance on scholars, even for the slightest act, has done is to place roadblocks in the path that often do not need to be there.  The insistance that we must all follow in lock step without question is another impediment that doesn't do justice for the faith and its practice, and, above all, we are called on to do justice in our word and deed.


Somehow, that call has been muted.


I have been on Bnet for about 10 years, and over that time, I have maintained that headcovering - khimar - is generally optional.  I also maintain that there is no reason for women to stop praying, if they can, or to enter the masjid during menstruation.  History shows that this was done during the time of the Prophet (pbuh), as were many things that are now considered to be forbidden or disliked, if not by God, then by Muslims.


The arguments made to keep women from functioning as normal, God created beings (i.e. men are the measure of "normal") also serve to keep perceptions of us as weak, easily lead astray and unable to lead.  But, this is not what the Prophet demonstrated, nor what Allah has commanded.  Many of the traditions are not about Islam itself, but about how male dominated societies and the makes who interpreted Islam within them determined the roles of women in the context of their culture. 


Now, we must be allowed to determine roles and practices within our own context. for that is the only way to show that we are able to evolve toward God's vision of His intent, and away from practices touted as validated by "consensus" that force us back into past practices and beliefs that are in many ways pre-Islamic.


Coronis, I wish you for you the best path to Allah for your ability to follow.


Love,


miraj

Disclaimer: The opinions of this member are not primarily informed by western ethnocentric paradigms, stereotypes rooted in anti-Muslim/Islam hysteria, "Israel can do no wrong" intransigence, or the perceived need to protect the Judeo-Christian world from invading foreign religions and legal concepts.  By expressing such views, no inherent attempt is being made to derail or hijack threads, but that may be the result.  The result is not the responsibility of this member.


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