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Switch to Forum Live View On the Ten Factors of Life: a non-ontological ontology
3 years ago  ::  Jan 01, 2015 - 2:21PM #1
etoro
Posts: 595

My only purpose for writing and sharing any thing on the belifnet blogoshere is simply to do my part in dropping seeds of enlightenment and the eternal awakening for the benefit



In the year 1258 Nichiren Daishonin wrote extensively on the principles and practice of great concentration and insight / observation of the mind on the basis of principles established by the great Lotus School Buddhist teachers of China, Yui Si Nan Yueh and his disciples Tien Tai Chi hi 800 years earlier. These writings of Nichiren would form the theoretical / spirtual foundations for the practice of reciting the Lotus Sutra and its title Nam Myoho Renge Kyo as the the most universal method / unconditional cause and unconditional effect for the immediate attainment of Buddhahood in ones own lifetime.  The ten factors, a universal law expouned by Shakyamuni Buddha at the beginning of the second chapter of the Lotus Sutra would form the basis of Tien Tai's teachinng of 3000 realms in a single moment of thought and ultimately the law of the unconditional cause and effect of the state of Buddhahood inherent within all beings. This principle, the ten factors, is a non-dual wisdom inherent in the true aspect of life, a law of the simultaneity of cause and effect, the eternal law of life inherent in a single moment of existence.


The following are excerpts of this wrting from Nichiren, Volume II.


  


On the Ten Factors


WE ourselves are none other than Thus Come Ones of original enlightenment, who possess the three bodies within a single body. This is made clear in the passage in the Lotus Sutra that speaks of the ten factors of “appearance, nature, entity, power, influence, internal cause, relation, latent effect, manifest effect, and their consistency from beginning to end.”1


First, with regard to appearance, this refers to the appearance manifested by the form and shape of our bodies. This corresponds to the manifested body of the Thus Come One. It also corresponds to emancipation and to the truth of temporary existence.


Next, with regard to nature, this refers to the nature of our minds. This corresponds to the reward body of the Thus Come One. It also corresponds to wisdom and to the truth of non-substantiality.


The third factor is entity, which is the entities of these lives of ours. It corresponds to the Dharma body of the Thus Come One. It also corresponds to the truth of the Middle Way, to the essential nature of phenomena, and to tranquil extinction.


These three factors constitute the Thus Come One of the three bodies. That these three factors represent the Thus Come One of the three bodies may seem to be an extraneous matter, but in fact it concerns these very lives of our own. One who understands this may be said to have grasped the meaning of the Lotus Sutra.


These three factors constitute the beginning, or basis, from which emerge the other seven factors, thus forming the ten factors. These ten factors are the basis of the hundred worlds, the thousand factors, and the three thousand realms. In this way a great number of doctrines are enunciated, which are known collectively as the eighty thousand teachings. But all of these come down to one single doctrine, that of the three truths. Outside of the doctrine of the three truths, there is no other doctrine.


The hundred worlds represent the truth of temporary existence, the thousand factors represent the truth of non-substantiality, and the three thousand realms represent the truth of the Middle Way. Non-substantiality, temporary existence, the Middle Way—these are the three truths. And although they are elaborated in numerous doctrines such as those pertaining to the hundred worlds, the thousand factors, or the three thousand realms, these are all simply the one doctrine of the three truths.


Thus the three truths expressed in the first three of the ten factors and the p.79three truths expressed in the remaining seven factors are simply this one doctrine of the three truths. The first three factors and the remaining seven factors are the principle contained within our own lives and are simply one thing, wonderful beyond comprehension. Hence it is stated in the sutra that they are marked by complete consistency from beginning to end. This is what is meant by the words “consistency from beginning to end.”


The first three factors are the “beginning,” and the remaining seven factors are the “end.” These make up the ten factors, which constitute the three truths contained within our own lives.


These three truths may also be called the Thus Come One of the three bodies. Outside of our own minds and bodies, there does not exist the tiniest trace of anything pertaining either to good or evil. Therefore we know that we ourselves are in fact Thus Come Ones of original enlightenment, possessors of the three bodies within a single body.

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