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2 years ago  ::  Feb 22, 2012 - 12:37PM #1
ffb
Posts: 2,126
I teach High School and recently read Siddhartha. The question was raised whether this text is an accurate representation of Buddhist thinking (theology? philosophy?) or a good summary of any stage in the development of Buddhism. How fictional is this text in terms of events and thought?

I know very little about Buddhism so I apologize if I'm asking something inappropriate or making references which are senseless.

Thanks.
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2 years ago  ::  Feb 29, 2012 - 3:55PM #2
allen-uk
Posts: 25

Hello ffb.


I don't know the book (or film, or maybe even musical by now), but my gut-feeling would be that the answer to your question is probably going to be found by your reading an 'accepted' Buddhism primer, such as "What the Buddha Taught" by Walpola Rahula, which was recommended on another posting on this site.


It is extremely 'readable', and aimed at the interested lay-person, with difficult terms and concepts explained. 


Anyway, it's helping me get a grip on Buddhism, so it might help you too.



Regards,



Allen.

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2 years ago  ::  Mar 01, 2012 - 8:49PM #3
Lisse
Posts: 17


Noting the book mentioned by Allen for my own benefit.


Also want to recommend the one I'm reading now to find out about Buddhism (just happened to be bought by a friend who never read it all this time):  How To See Yourself As You Really Are by the Dalai Lama.  


It addresses the thing I had found confusing ~ namely, how can Buddhists believe in reincarnation if they don't think there is such a thing as a soul.




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2 years ago  ::  Mar 12, 2012 - 7:47PM #4
etoro
Posts: 565

Mar 1, 2012 -- 8:49PM, Lisse wrote:



Noting the book mentioned by Allen for my own benefit.


Also want to recommend the one I'm reading now to find out about Buddhism (just happened to be bought by a friend who never read it all this time):  How To See Yourself As You Really Are by the Dalai Lama.  


It addresses the thing I had found confusing ~ namely, how can Buddhists believe in reincarnation if they don't think there is such a thing as a soul.








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2 years ago  ::  Mar 12, 2012 - 8:00PM #5
etoro
Posts: 565



Mar 1, 2012 -- 8:49PM, Lisse wrote:



Noting the book mentioned by Allen for my own benefit.


Also want to recommend the one I'm reading now to find out about Buddhism (just happened to be bought by a friend who never read it all this time):  How To See Yourself As You Really Are by the Dalai Lama.  


It addresses the thing I had found confusing ~ namely, how can Buddhists believe in reincarnation if they don't think there is such a thing as a soul.








Hi Lisse:


in terms of your first question I also read Siddhartha by Herman hesse in High School and this book got me very interested in Buddhism. Amazingly enough, due to various family issues and his own personal challenges my father, long divorced,  (of all people) got into Buddhist practice and study within several years later and my brother and I followed him into the faith.  We are all till this day followers (leaders as well) of the Nichiren School of Buddhism in the SGI International and have been practicing for over 30 years. 


Suffice it to say the book Siddhartha by Herman Hesse is a fictionlized version which seeks to recount the search for enlightenment by a young Indian man with the same name and during a similar time as that of Siddhartha Gautama who later came to be called Shakyamuni Buddha.  The Buddha's story is actually a little different than the account in the book but the theme is quite similar.  The theme of the book is also very compelling and the overall plot and approach of the story is enough to arouse great curiosity in the reader and also opens up the viewpoint that an individual can go about searching for true knowledge regarding the true nature of things in an objective and open manner.


 


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2 years ago  ::  Mar 22, 2012 - 7:44AM #6
nnn123
Posts: 1,530


It is sometimes taught that the way to enter the study of Buddhism is to start with the scriptures themselves.  Read and meditate on them for at least a few years, before reading the writings of others, about them.



Buddhist Writings

Dhammapada - (sayings of the Buddha)


www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/...


++++

101 Zen Stories

www.101zenstories.com/

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