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Switch to Forum Live View The Dhammapada - The Mind
3 years ago  ::  Jun 12, 2011 - 6:49PM #1
nnn123
Posts: 1,530

The Dhammapada - the sayings of the Buddha

Dhp III
PTS: Dhp 33-43
Cittavagga: The Mind
translated from the Pali by
Thanissaro Bhikkhu
© 1997–2011


www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/...
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3 years ago  ::  Jun 18, 2011 - 1:13PM #2
etoro
Posts: 549

Yes this is all very nice.  Numerous schools both Buddhist and non-Buddhist have sprung forth to address this very matter; the conditions of the mind. Huge historical events have unfolded across Asia addressing this very matter.  By and large the vast majority of traditional Asian Buddhists are still befuddled by the minds workings and more importantly the true wisdom of the Buddha as revealed in the Lotus Sutra.  Westerners now flirt with various Buddhist principle and practices yet do not yet have comprehensive understanding of the underlying causality and conditions by which various teachings and methods of Buddhist practices were adminsitered by the Buddha. They assume that because they now enjoy a powerful system of law enforcement across their lands that such pursuits, ie such as retreats for quiet meditation and pondering, talks on various high minded ideas, in themselves are the causes which will bring forth Buddha's wisdom to shine within themselves and the enlightenment that they seek.  Yet, if a peaceful and truly effective social culture has not yet manifested in traditional Buddhist countries how does one assume that the consumption of high minded Buddhist principls will bring any actual benefit now?


The reason why such indulgences in retreats and such bring little actual fruit is that the diagnosis such that earthly desires are simply the source of suffering and that the antidote, the cutting off of cravings for earthly desires is simply an expediency instructed by the Buddha within the context of a vastly comprehensive principle of insight for which only the Buddha himself was aware of at the time. To stabilize the mind requires that one discovers the limitless expanse of wisdom, the source of Buddha's power right in the heart of mundane reality without having to cut off anything.  This is the most difficult thing to understand in the realm of Buddhism. 


If by mundane reality we refer to the lower six paths of life;  hell, hunger, animality, competitiveness, stability (humanity) and bliss (heaven), then how can one transform these transient migratory states of mind, influenced as they are by the need to eat, to breath, to love, to subdue others, the pain caused when such needs are not met, simply by subduing cravings.


Those who seek the Buddhist path in this later age should have a deep seeking mind to pursue the most difficult and complex teachings of the Buddha.  We should heed the words of the sutras which evolve from shallow one sided views to the deepest revelations of the Buddhas knowledge and insight.


The appearance and formulation of the Mahayana within the practice of Buddhism consists of the wisdom of the Bodhisattva path; a path of Buddhist practice which vows to save all living beings first rather than the path to cut off ones own earthly desires in order to eliminate karmic outflows within oneself alone. The path that seeks to cut off earthly desires is a path inward that seeks to negate the functions of the six sense faculities and the so called eighteen elements of existence;  that is "the all" as the Buddha called it.  But this view  presupposes that one's manifested appearance into "this world" in the form of self, others and the natural environment itself is the manifested effect of ignorance.  Ignorance is also the first link in the principle of the 12 fold chain of causation. As we delve deeper into Buddhist philosophy we find that this form of Buddhist reasoning is the most superficial corresponding to the first of the three truths; that is temporary existence, nonsubstantiality and the middleway of wisdom.


According to the most accomplished of the Buddhist sages throughout India and China all of the 84,000 discourses of the Buddha addressing life can be fit into either of these three categories as well as all of them combined in the form of a single great truth. As we delve deeper into Buddhist philosophy we find that these principles were first addressed in the form of oppositional dichotomies or dualities and then progessively from dualities to non-dualities.  This all presupposes a search for the true self nature of living beings and a radical denunciation of extremist views.  

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 8:05AM #3
Rewjr
Posts: 2
Forgive me if this has already been answered. I'm new to this community. I understand that The Dhammapada, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu is available free of charge. Does that include the printed version or just the on-line version? I'd like to have a printed copy to carry with me. I'd be willing to pay for it or make a monetary contribution. Thank you for your consideration.
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 10:53AM #4
vacchagotta
Posts: 298

Aug 25, 2011 -- 8:05AM, Rewjr wrote:

Forgive me if this has already been answered. I'm new to this community. I understand that The Dhammapada, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu is available free of charge. Does that include the printed version or just the on-line version? I'd like to have a printed copy to carry with me. I'd be willing to pay for it or make a monetary contribution. Thank you for your consideration.




Accesstoinsight.org says that  www.watmetta.org/ offers this book in print.



Contact:


Book Request


Metta Forest Monastery
P.O. Box 1409
Valley Center, CA 92082
USA



www.accesstoinsight.org/outsources/books...


in friendliness,


V.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 10:54AM #5
RenGalskap
Posts: 1,420
I'm not aware of a printed version of Thanissaro's translation. A quick Google search doesn't turn up anything. You might find something if you did a search at Amazon. Unlike publishing on the Internet, publishing hard copy involves costs for materials, printing, and distribution, so if it exists, it probably isn't free.

Gil Fronsdale recently published a translation of the Dhammapada that has gotten good reviews. Since it came out recently, it is still likely to be in bookstores.

I hope that helps.
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 3:29PM #6
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 772

Aug 25, 2011 -- 8:05AM, Rewjr wrote:

Forgive me if this has already been answered. I'm new to this community. I understand that The Dhammapada, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu is available free of charge. Does that include the printed version or just the on-line version? I'd like to have a printed copy to carry with me. I'd be willing to pay for it or make a monetary contribution. Thank you for your consideration.



Dhammapada


I am not sure about the Thanissaro Bhikkhu version. However, the Pali Text Society sell Buddhist Books Online, The Dhammapada is listed.


www.palitext.com/


If you are ordering this book from the USA, it may be obtained from this website:


www.pariyatti.org/Bookstore/productdetai...


 

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 4:08PM #7
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 772

Audio Dhammapada


 


Readings from the Dhammapada by Gil Fronsdal


www.insightmeditationcenter.org/books-ar...

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 4:20PM #8
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 772

Theravada Buddhism


www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/dhp/

The Dhammapada: Verses and Stories

Translated by Daw Mya Tin, M.A.

Edited by Editorial Committee, Burma Tipitaka Association Rangoon, Burma, 1986

Courtesy of Nibbana.com
For free distribution only, as a gift of dhamma.


May all beings live in peace and harmony


May all beings be happy.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 26, 2011 - 12:02AM #9
Bob0
Posts: 482


Or....buy yourself a notebook, some document protectors and hit print.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 26, 2011 - 1:00AM #10
Rewjr
Posts: 2

Thanks to all who have responded. I have actually already thought of the notebook, sleeve idea and that is probably what I will end up doing or I could just go to Powell's Books here and Portland and buy a copy. Thanks though. Lots of options.

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