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Switch to Forum Live View Milarepa – Revenge and Redemption
7 years ago  ::  Nov 07, 2010 - 1:36AM #1
CommieJesus
Posts: 276


I just saw the movie made by Neten Chokling about the early years of Milarepa. It was fabulous, a truly well done film. The film however diverged a little from MY story of Jetsun Milarepa, according what I know; he was a sorcerer in his early years, having been cheated out of his inheritance by his uncle, his mother and he had to endure tremendous hardship. Abandoned by most of his family, his mother commanded him to learn sorcery in order to revenge the wrongs the rest of the family put upon them. She said, if he would not do so, she would kill herself. So, Milarepa set out to learn Black Magic, in his long journey in search of a master wizard, Milarepa met every kind of charlatans, who lied to him and cheated him of all his meager assets. Finally, he reached  Yontan Gyathso, to whom he told his sad story. Yontan Gyathso was moved to pity and taught the young man the way to create earthquakes; therefore he sent a terrible one to his enemies’ village, killing 35. But some days after a wandering hermit reported that the surviving relatives threatened to kill Milarepa’s mother and sister in revenge.


Then the wizard taught Milarepa the magic of the hail, that was immediately launched and destroyed all the harvests without provoking other victims. At this point the relatives surrendered to the magical power of Milarepa.


“Falling in a single mass, the hail, as thick as three layers of wall, hit the harvest and the valley. The whole mountain turned to streams and the people of the country, having lost their crops, sobbed.”


I have listened the explanations and commentaries of the Buddhist scholars of the amazing phenomena of Milarepa who from a murderer became a saint, reaching enlightenment and Buddhahood in a single lifetime. None of them made prefect sense, they danced around the human facet of the story. Milarepa was an ordinary person with extraordinarily strong mind and put in a circumstance where he had no choice but to make difficult choices. Would he have been a better person had he abandoned his mother hence avoid the Karma of murder but perhaps commit a worse act karmically? I doubt it. You see, the moral of the story of Milarepa is that none of us knows the hidden secret of a person’s karmic “bank account”, and how the choices they make, might incur good and bad karma at the same time. Murder is universally wrong but I would commit murder if I had to save my daughter from harm. Behind Milarepa’s murderous rage, there was the obedience of a loving son, fearful of his mother committing suicide. Being a loyal son, assuredly had earned him some merit, giving up his own life and desires was a act of self-sacrifice, even if it was for a high price.


The truth is, we are seldom in the position to clearly see the akashic records and the fabric of acts, causing other acts, akin to dominoes falling. The story of Milarepa is an amazing one and teaches us to follow our heart, no matter what happens and that redemption is available to all, no matter what acts have been committed.


As the Ancient Wisdom paradoxically says; “If you must make a mistake, make a big one”.


 

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7 years ago  ::  Nov 12, 2010 - 6:45AM #2
etoro
Posts: 595

Commiejesus, in your prior post you state,


"None of them made prefect sense, they danced around the human facet  of the story."


Here you have substituted the wisdom of the Buddhist sages for your own view.  Is this correct?  You have in essence expressed doubt in various things. You then state,


"Milarepa was an ordinary person with extraordinarily  strong mind and put in a circumstance where he had no choice but to make  difficult choices. Would he have been a better person had he abandoned  his mother hence avoid the Karma of murder but perhaps commit a worse  act karmically? I doubt it. You see, the moral of the story of Milarepa  is that none of us knows the hidden secret of a person’s karmic “bank  account”, and how the choices they make, might incur good and bad karma  at the same time. Murder is universally wrong but I would commit murder  if I had to save my daughter from harm. Behind Milarepa’s murderous  rage, there was the obedience of a loving son, fearful of his mother  committing suicide. Being a loyal son, assuredly had earned him some merit, giving up his own life and desires was a act of self-sacrifice, even if it was for a high price.


The truth is, we  are seldom in the position to clearly see the akashic records and the  fabric of acts, causing other acts, akin to dominoes falling. The story  of Milarepa is an amazing one and teaches us to follow our heart, no  matter what happens and that redemption is available to all, no matter  what acts have been committed."


"As the Ancient Wisdom paradoxically says; “If you must make a mistake, make a big one”.


The above represents the issues that are the substance of the Mahayana philosophy: the pathways and byways of ordinary men and women who seek true happiness within the realm of ordinary worldly affairs; the path of seeking a state of true justice and redemption over the good and evil manifestations in our lives.


Here we can debate whether the term "true happiness" as sought by people in the context of their ordinary lives can be synonymous with the term "nirvana".  Is it possible to attain "nirvana" within the realm of ordinary life in society?  Such are the issues that are addressed in the Mahayana sutras.  I am not a Tibetan Buddhist so I am not familiar with the story of Milarepa per se. I am a student of the Tien Tai / Nichiren Lotus tradition.  However when we look at the underlying subtance of the issues being addressed whether it be Tibetan / Indian / Chinese or Japanese Buddhism the issues are all equivalent. This is because these are among the universal issues confronted by all mankind.


The Mahayana teaches the principle of attaining Buddhahood in a single lifetime.  While this matter is also suggested in the pre-mahayana or Agama Buddhist doctrine the factors to be considered are extremely subtle and derive from yogic wisdom into the true nature of the mind, true nature of reality.


While the principle of being true to the heart is a universal axiom embraced by all human beings, human beings themselves are trapped in a realm of relativity. In this respect for example, Milarepa caused a mud slide made from hail that destroyed crops and created an earthquake that killed 35 people. No doubt some of those affected were innocents that were in the wrong place at the wrong time. For this common sense would dictate that Milarepa should fall into hell.  Yet Buddhism teaches that a greater good cancels out a lesseer evil and vice versa.


In Buddhism the taking of life is prohibited. Anyone who does so falls into one of the eight cold hells and must spend repeated rebirths in such states for may kalpas or aeons. Such is the fate of ordinary people. They give their lives for shallow worldly affairs but rarely do they commit themselves to the path that leads to Buddhahood.  Yet it is taught that Milarepa attained Buddhahood in a single life time.


This teaching must be the wonderful Law. 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 




 

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7 years ago  ::  Nov 16, 2010 - 3:48PM #3
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 973

The inspiration to be derived from reading the History of Milarepa is that he managed to overcome murderous ways of behaving, according to the Buddha's Dharma.


The notion that only the Vajrayana and the Mahayana can Teach the Only Path to Enlightenment in a single lifetime is not taught in the History of Milarepa. Milarepa followed two paths in life: The Path of Darkness and The Path of Light. Milarepa's Teaching is preserved in One Hundred Thousand Songs. All of these songs were written extempore from his experiences of Dharma.


Milarepa's Guru was Marpa The Translator. Marpa went to India to obtain the authentic Dharma.


The Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism traces its lineage back to Shakyamuni Buddha. In India, Marpa was taught by Naropa, who was taught by Tilopa, both Mahasiddhas.


Milarepa is known as the greatest yogi of Tibet. The Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism utilises oral instruction, from Preceptor to Student, down thorugh the ages. Marpa received the Oral Dharma in Sanskrit and translated it into Tibetan. Milarepa realised the Dharma in Tibetan, from his Guru's Instructions.


The difference between Shakyamuni Gautama Buddha and Milarepa is that Shakyamuni had no Guru. His was a Self-Enlightenment. Milarepa's Enlightement was Taught by his Guru. That is the fundamental difference.


Milarepa's student, Gampopa founded the Monasitc Order of the Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism. Today, the School is headed by the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa.

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