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Switch to Forum Live View Gongyo Chant Transcript, does anyone have one?
9 years ago  ::  May 17, 2009 - 7:10PM #1
Jeremywestenn
Posts: 2

I know that in Nichiren Buddhism we chant Namyhorengekyo. But that beyond that we chant out parts of the sutra itself. What I've been trying to find though is an actual transcript of the chant(s) that we do. Something I can take and read off of. So far I've found some very interesting and helpful youtube videos, which I could probably play and then type the words that are on the screen as they come up. But isn't there some sort of better guide I can get? Either online or in a small book form?


 


Any help is appreciated. I'd like to start chanting this week.


 


:)

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9 years ago  ::  May 18, 2009 - 7:44AM #2
Engyo
Posts: 138

Hi Jeremy -


What you are chanting is the first portion of Chapter 2 of the Lotus Sutra (up to the Ten suchnesses) and the last (verse) section of Chapter 16 of the Lotus Sutra. 


Some Nichiren groups (Nichiren Shu in particular) chant this in the pratitioner's native tongue as well as in shindoku.  We do this on a regular basis at my temple.


Here are links to a couple of different english translations of the Lotus Sutra.


www.nshi.org/Lotus%20Sutra/Saddharma%20P... (translated by Senchu Murano)


lotus.nichirenshu.org/lotus/sutra/englis... (translated by Burton Watson)


This page has several different versions of Nichiren service books from different groups.


groups.yahoo.com/group/SanghaForIndepend...


I hope this is helpful.


 

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9 years ago  ::  May 19, 2009 - 8:08PM #3
etoro
Posts: 595

Jeremy


In the larger litergy booklet produced by the SGI for the members you can find a translation of both chapters in the back of the book.  The SGI also recently started offering a recent translation of the the Lotus Sutra translated by Burton Watson.  The latest version also includes the introductpry and prologue sutras as well. Well worth strudying these writings in their English translation. 


 


Peace


 

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9 years ago  ::  May 19, 2009 - 10:25PM #4
Joybringer
Posts: 1

Hi I just wanted to say by far the finest translation of the Lotus Sutra is "A Contemporary Translation of a Buddhist Classic, The Lotus Sutra" by Gene Reeves.  I have read all three major versions of the english translations including obviously the Watson version and find Reeves version an improvement in that he uses english words that a reader should be familiar while maintaing the integrity of the Lotus Sutra.


I also believe that you can not fully appreciate what Nichiren is telling us unless we study the Sutras and that includes reading it.  Nichiren never did not comprehend what he was chanting, nor did he ever advocate that reading or copying the Lotus Sutra did not confer benefit to a follower.  Each and every chapter and verse of the Lotus Sutra is sacred and is worthy of our devotion and praise.

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8 years ago  ::  May 24, 2009 - 1:24PM #5
leguru
Posts: 167

Jeremy,


The Gongyo chant is actually a phonetic version of ancient Chinese. You will find the same sounds in the liturgy books in Spanish, Japanese, Korean, etc. Early Buddhists transmitted the Buddha's teaching by voice, memorizing those teachings and passing them on vocally. In fact, culturally, when print was first introduced it did not have the confidence of the people - it could easliy be changed by anyone. When someone spoke to you, you could see their body language as well and make a better value judgement of their commitment to what was said. The symbol, Kyo, represents vibrations or teachings, because the only way to transmit teachings universally was by sound - not everyone could read and there were very few scrolls to read. So, chanting is more than just repeating the meaning of the sutra, it is a way of preserving the original intent in the earliest language of translation. There is a guide to the sounds in the beginning of the liturgy books. Try to  practice chanting the phonetics. There is a great deal of benefit to be gained from this.

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8 years ago  ::  May 25, 2009 - 4:33AM #6
Zanomo
Posts: 1

May 24, 2009 -- 1:24PM, leguru wrote:


Jeremy,


The Gongyo chant is actually a phonetic version of ancient Chinese. You will find the same sounds in the liturgy books in Spanish, Japanese, Korean, etc. Early Buddhists transmitted the Buddha's teaching by voice, memorizing those teachings and passing them on vocally. In fact, culturally, when print was first introduced it did not have the confidence of the people - it could easliy be changed by anyone. When someone spoke to you, you could see their body language as well and make a better value judgement of their commitment to what was said. The symbol, Kyo, represents vibrations or teachings, because the only way to transmit teachings universally was by sound - not everyone could read and there were very few scrolls to read. So, chanting is more than just repeating the meaning of the sutra, it is a way of preserving the original intent in the earliest language of translation. There is a guide to the sounds in the beginning of the liturgy books. Try to  practice chanting the phonetics. There is a great deal of benefit to be gained from this.




----------


It is not Chinese, Contemporary nor Ancient.  It sounded more like Japanese than Chinese. For example, 方便品第二 (ho beng bong dai ni):  in Mandarin Chinese it pronounced "fang bien pin di er" or Cantonese "fong bin baan daii yii".  When the 南無妙法蓮華經 (Sad-dharma Puṇḍárīka Sūtra)  (in Japanese it reads Namyo ho ren ge gyo) was brought into China and translated into Chinese, it was during the Tang Dynasty and the spoken language during that periond is similar to Cantonese, However, being a native Cantonese speaker, I cannot understand a single word that I chanted. 


By the way, I am with SGI Hong Kong Chapter since 1985 and left last year.  I am a now Buddhist.

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8 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2009 - 2:19PM #7
Arizonamildman
Posts: 3






You can go to the Sokka Gakai International website and get all the information that you need on gongyo practice. The pronunciation guide is this: a as in father , e as in ten, i as in machine, o as in open, u as in rule, ai as in Thailand, iu as in Louie, g as in get, j as in joy, ts as in bets, h as in hello, and y as in yet .  Rythm try to maintain the same rythm and tone throughout, a monotone. Correct pronunciation is important and don't trade speed for proper enunciation. If you sound like an Oklahoma auctioneer calling a square dance, then you need to slow down and listen to the MP3 provided on the S.G.I. website, in fact it might be a good place to start when learning to chant is to download and chant with it until you get used to it. That can be found at www.sgi-usa.org/newmembers/resources/slo... and the gongyo goes as follows:  You sound the bell and chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo six times.


Silent Prayers: The first, second, and third silent prayer are to be said in the morning.  The second, third, and fourth silent prayer are to be said in the evening.


Then you are supposed to say the silent prayers to yourself: (first silent prayer) Aprreciation for Life's Protective Forces (shoten zenjin) "I offer appreciation to the functions is life and the environment (shoten zenjin) that serve to protect us, and pary that these protective powers be further strengthened and enhanced through my practice of the Law.  Chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo three times. Then continue by reciting the sutra.


Hoben-pon dai ni.
Niji seson.
Ju sanmai.
An jo ni ki.
Go shari hotsu.
Sho- but chi e.
Jinjin muryo.
Go Chi e mon.
Nange nannyu.
Issai Shomon.
Hyaku shi butsu.
Sho fu no chi.
Sho i sha ga.
Butsu zo shingon.
Hyaku sen man noku.
Mushu sho butsu.
Jin gyo sho butsu.
Muryo doho.
Yumyo shojin.
Mi zo u ho.
Zui gi sho setsu.
Ishu nange.
Shari hotsu.
Go ju jo butsu irai.
Shuju innen.
Shuju hiyu.
Ko en gonkyo.
Mu shu hoben.
Indo shujo.
Ryo ri sho jaku.
Sho-i sha ga.
Nyorai hoben.
Chi-ken hari mitsu.
Kai i gu-soku.
Shari hotsu.
Nyorai chi-ken.
Kodai jinnon.
Muryo muge.
Riki.
Mu-sho-i.
Zenjo.
Gedas.
Sanmai
Jin nyu musai.
Joju issai.
Miz-o-u ho.
Shari hotsu.
Nyorai chi-ken.
Kodai jinnon.
Muryo muge.
Riki.
Mu-sho-i.
Zenjo.
Gedas.
Sanmai.
Jin nyu musai.
Joju isai.
Mi-zo-u ho.
Shari hotsu.
Nyorai no.
Shuju fun-betsu.
Gyo ses sho ho.
Gon-ji nuynan.
Ekka shushin.
Shari hotsu.
Shu gyo gon shi.
Muryo muhen.
Mi-zo-u ho.
Bus shitsu joju.
Shi shari-hotsu.
Fu shu bu setsu.
Sho-i sha ga.
Bus sho joju.
Dai ichi ke-u.
Nange shi ho.
Yui butsu you butsu.
Nai no kujin.
Shoho jisso.
Sho-i shoho. Nyo ze so.
Nyo ze sho. No ze tai.
Nyo ze riki. Nyo ze sa.
Nyo ze in. Nyo ze en.
Nyo ze ka. Nyo ze ho.
Nyo ze honmak kukyo to.
Sho-i shoho. Nyo ze so.
Nyo ze sho. No ze tai.
Nyo ze riki. Nyo ze sa.
Nyo ze in. Nyo ze en.
Nyo ze ka. Nyo ze ho.
Nyo ze honmak kukyo to.
Sho-i shoho. Nyo ze so.
Nyo ze sho. No ze tai.
Nyo ze riki. Nyo ze sa.
Nyo ze in. Nyo ze en.
Nyo ze ka. Nyo ze ho. (The next line is said slowly,)                                                                Nyo ze honmak kukyo to.                                                                                                       (We pause here, then continue.)
Myo ho ren ge kyo.
Nyorai Ju-ryo-hon.
Dai ju-roku.
Ji ga toku bur rai.
Sho kyo sho kosshu.
Muryo hyaku sen man.
Oku sai asogi.
Jo seppo kyoke.
Mushu oku shujo.
Ryo nyu o butsu-do.
Nirai muryo ko.
I do shujo ko.
Hoben gen nehan.
Ni jitsu fu mestu-do.
Jo ju shi seppo.
Jo ju shi seppo.
Ga j o ju o shi.
I sho jin - zu-riki.
Ryo tendo shujo.
Sui gon hi fu ken.
Shu ken ga metsu-do.
Ko kuyo shari.
Gen kai e renbo.
Ni sho katsu-go shin.
Shujo ki shin-buku.
Shichi-jiki i nyunan.
Isshin yok ken butsu.
Fu ji shaku shinmyo.
Ji ga gyu shuso.
Ku shutsu ryojusen.
Ga ji go shujo.
Jo zai shi fu-metsu.
I ho-ben-rik ko.
Gen u metsu fu metsu.
Yo-koku u shujo.
Kygyo shingyo sha.
Ga bu o hi chu.
I setsu mujo ho.
Nyoto fu mon shi.
Tan ni ga metsu-do.
Ga ken sho shujo.
Motsu-zai o kukai.
Ko fu i gen shin.
Ryo go sho katsu-go.
In go shin renbo.
Nai shutsu i seppo.
Jin zu riki nyo ze.
O asogi ko.
Jo zai ryojusen.
Gyu yo sho jusho.
Shujo ken ko jin.
Dai ka sho sho ji.
Ga shi do annon.
Tennin jo juman.
Onrin sho do-kaku.
Shuju ho shogon.
Hoju ta keka.
Shujo sho yu-raku.
Shoten gyaku tenku.
Jo sas^shu gi-gaku.
U mandara ke.
San butsu gyu daishu.
Ga jodo fu ki.
Ni shu ken sho jin.
Ufu sho kuno.
Nyo ze shitsu juman.
Ze sho zai shujo.
I aku-go innen.
Ka asogi ko.
Fu mon sanbo myo.
Sho u shu ku-doku.
Nyuwa shichi-jiki sha.
Sokkai ken gashin.
Zai shi ni seppo.
Waku-ji i shi shu.
Setsu butsu-ju muryo.
Ku nai ken bussha.
I setsu butsu nan chi.
Ga chi-riki nyo ze.
Eko sho muryo.
Jumyo mushu ko.
Ku shugo sho toku.
Nyoto u chi sha.
Mot^to shi sho gi.
To dan ryo yo jin.
Butsu-go jip^puko.
Nyo i zen hoben.
I ji o shi ko.
Jitsu zai ni gon shi.
Mu no sek^komo.
Ga yaku i se bu.
Ku sho kugen sha.
I bonbu tendo.
Jitsu zai ni gon metsu.
I joken ga ko.
Ni sho kyoshi shin.
Ho-itsu jaku go-yoku.
Da o aku-do chu.
Ga jo chi shujo.
Gyo do fu gyo do.
Zui o sho ka do.
I ses^shuju ho.
Mai ji sa ze nen.
I ga ryo shujo.
Toku nyu mu-jo do.                                                                                                                  (Once again this last line is said slowly.)
 Soku joju busshin.                                                                                                                                   (The bell is run again and Nam Myoho Renge Kyo is chanted three times again. Then you begin chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo repeatedly for as long as you feel like chanting. It depends on what you are chanting for. The following is the last silent prayers)                       Second silent prayer:  Appreciation for the Gohonzon "I acknowledge my debt of gratitude and offer profound appreciation to he Dai-Gohonzon of the Three Great Secret Laws, which was bestowed upon the entire world; to Nichiren Daishonin, the Buddha of the Latter Day of the Law; and to Nikko Shonin.


I acknowledge my debt of gratitude and offer appreciation for Nichimoku Shonin. Chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo three times. 


The third Silent Prayer:   For the attainment of Kosen-rufu  I pray that the great desire for kosen-rufu be fulfilled, and that the Soka Gakkai International develop in this endeavor for countless generations and offer appreciation for the founding presidents - Tsunesaburo Makiguchi, Josei Toda and Daisaku Ikeda - for their eternal examples of selfless dedication to the propagation of the Law.     Chant Nam Myoho Kyo three times.                                    Fourth Silent Prayer:  Personal prayers and Prayer for the Deceased  "I pray to bing forth Buddhahood from within my life and accomplish my own human revolution, change my destiny and fulfill my wishes in the pesent and the future. (Offer additional prayers here.)  I pray for my deceased relatives and for all those who have passed away, particularly for these individuals: (Sound the blle continuously while offering prayers.)  Chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo three times.


I pray for peace thoughout the world and the happiness of all living beings. Sound the bell and chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo three times to conlude. (Group chants in unison.)


I hope this has been helpful. Thank You for allowing me to be of service. Our Buddhism is developed in faith, practice, and study. We practice by chanting and by helping the new person "shaku buku" in the evangelic tradition of Buddhism to pass on the wisdom of Shakyamuni Buddha.

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8 years ago  ::  Apr 05, 2010 - 10:04AM #8
Galandris
Posts: 1

During a trip to Japan, I heard a monk chanting a powerful chant with a repeted word sounding like "sa ku ni" followed by a syllable, then repeted and so on. I have searched google to find what it could be to no avail. Maybe it will ring a bell with you? What could it be?

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8 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2010 - 1:14AM #9
Arizonamildman
Posts: 3

Does anyone bother to read the previous posts? See for yourself on my post by ArizonaMildman that this is the entire text from our gongyo book. You might be able to find what you are looking for there, I can't find something while going "something like" something. Read what the real Gongyo sounds like and maybe you can find it. Who knows what a priest from Japan added to this? I am an SGI member in America which is a LAY organisation who don't use priests. If you can't find it in the text of my previous post, then I can't help you.


Sorry

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8 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2010 - 7:23AM #10
Engyo
Posts: 138

Apr 5, 2010 -- 10:04AM, Galandris wrote:


During a trip to Japan, I heard a monk chanting a powerful chant with a repeted word sounding like "sa ku ni" followed by a syllable, then repeted and so on. I have searched google to find what it could be to no avail. Maybe it will ring a bell with you? What could it be?



Hi Galandris-


I am not familiar with the specific phrase you mention, but it could very well be any number of different Sutra passages from quite a few different Sutras.  Do you happen to know what school the monk followed?  That might narrow down the possibilities.


Namaste, Engyo

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