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Switch to Forum Live View Can You Practice Buddism If You Are Christian?
6 years ago  ::  May 27, 2009 - 4:00AM #1
Lycas7x
Posts: 11

I think that I'm trying to avoid intimacy by diving head first into Buddhism.  Like most philosophies of life it certainly changed the nature of my questions.  I had to get the over emphisis on Christianity and the 12 steps out of my head.  I want to see the truth in all things in a compassionate way.  No God No self No one... the emptiness.  The earth was without still and void.


I still haven't reached meditation levels or the ability to sit, but I like the way I look at defilements and disire now;  the five hiderances.  These precepts are much more vast and I could have never grapsed them 20 years ago.  I have seen and heard things that spirtual people avoid living with active addiction in my household.  The group, the readings and the path.  I met a buddhist many years ago leaving his Catholism behind.  He was into the Nechren Shoshu sect.  They kept telling him that everything was slander. We went seperate ways.


There are many answers to the same question.  All roads lead to the same destination.  Its in the journey. The ability to let go of old ideas is not restricted to Chritianity or Buddhism.

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 05, 2009 - 2:49AM #2
Lycas7x
Posts: 11

I would like to know what happened to my post.  It must have been a computer glich.


I don't know what type of Buddhism I'm practicing.  Apparently  I don't exist.  I must be on the right page someplace.   Take what you learn in Buddhism and apply it to what you already know is a quote from somebody well on  the path of enlightenment.


I too am tired of beliefnet.  Just at what point do you become a Buddhist and have a right to ask a question or participate in this forum is what I'd like to know.  I've been studying the philosophy on the internet for over 2 years, but yet all my comments are removed.   I agree with the statements that say practice is more important than wisdom.... You need not know where the poison arrow came from that struck you.   Remove it.  The type of poison?


Avoidance is not always the objective obtained thru mindfulness.   I did make that up

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 05, 2009 - 3:34AM #3
Lycas7x
Posts: 11

Sorry... Found the post... it started out reverse order.


good topic

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 4:00PM #4
Greentea89
Posts: 6

Absolutely in my opinion, Buddhism in itself isn't so much a religion as a belief structure, I can't find myself any contradictions between Buddhist beliefs while still believing in Christ as your savior. I feel that CHrist can help one live purely through Buddhist beliefs.

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2009 - 7:44PM #5
Larosser
Posts: 413

I attend Soto Zen group meditations that are hosted by a Catholic church. A number of Jesuits practice with us, and one occassionally leads. I've talked with them from time to time about the combination, and they seem comfortable with "spiritually mature" Christians practicing meditation.  Just a data point.


Several members of my family have meditated with me. Some found it rewarding, some did not. I don't know if their religion was a factor, or if it had more to do with their personalities and where they were spiritually.


On the "rewarding" side: Unitarian, Catholic, Quaker, Baptist, Mormon


On the "not rewarding" side: Catholic, Church of Christ, Atheist, Pagan.


Most of those who didn't find it rewardingall seemed nervous and a little defensive, and one commented that she was afraid the Devil would come in while she meditated.


One of the "nots" was very open and relaxed with the idea, but really had trouble with the idea of NOT visualizing something.


Not a statistically significant sample, I know, but it's the experience I have.


La

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 4:37PM #6
RenGalskap
Posts: 1,420
So, if you're a Christian, you can practice Buddhism as long as it doesn't make you nervous. Sounds reasonable to me. ;)
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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 6:24PM #7
Larosser
Posts: 413

Jul 17, 2009 -- 4:37PM, RenGalskap wrote:

So, if you're a Christian, you can practice Buddhism as long as it doesn't make you nervous. Sounds reasonable to me. ;)



I know, I know - THANK YOU, Captain Obvious! Smile


I just don't have anything to say about what either Christians or Buddhists "can" or "may" do, nobody left me in charge of doctrine or dogma for either faith. I figured it might be useful to relate some experiential data to the mix of input.


La

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 6:39PM #8
lulu2
Posts: 454

I dont believe the Dali Lama or Christ would see any commited practice to know God, forbidden. There are Christian monks, and sisters, who devote their lives, to prayer and meditation. Both call for discipline and devotion. Christs followers are called disciples.  The only difference I see, is that mediation and prayer are passive froms. Meaning that they are asking to recieve something. Some Christians, although they may use these practices, are also required to be active in their faith. Not to always in the passive position of recieving, but rather to be active, in their service to God. 

Without the Soul of Christ alive in us...we are nothing but empty shells...
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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 7:59PM #9
Larosser
Posts: 413

Buddhists also practice service. It's sometimes referred to as practicing the perfections, the first of which is charity or generosity. You'll see Buddhists working in shelters, child care centers, with the homeless and the aged. Same concept, I think. Prayer or meditation is reflection and communication, service is action on behalf of others.

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 8:37PM #10
RenGalskap
Posts: 1,420
Hi Lulu,

Jul 17, 2009 -- 6:39PM, lulu2 wrote:

I dont believe the Dali Lama or Christ would see any commited practice to know God,forbidden.


The DL has pointed out that Buddhism has no creator god, and no god who is the ground of being as the Christian god is. In Buddhism, gods are powerful critters. Some are helpful and some aren't, but they're all mortal and will die someday. None of them can give you enlightenment or make you enlightened. The DL has frequently encouraged Christians to remain Christian rather than convert to Buddhism, because he feels they would have difficulty dealing with a religion that doesn't have an omnipotent creator god.

Jul 17, 2009 -- 6:39PM, lulu2 wrote:

The only difference I see, is that mediation and prayer are passive froms.Meaning that they are asking to recieve something.


Not in Buddhism. Doing nothing is harder and more active than you think. And, speaking from experience, Buddhist meditation is about giving up, not receiving. Based on my reading in Christian mysticism, I believe the same is true for Christian meditation. But you may well have experience in Christian contemplation, and I don't.

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