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9 years ago  ::  Dec 14, 2008 - 12:43AM #1
NeuroMan
Posts: 4
It's been about two, or perhaps three years since the last time I did serious meditation. I have let myself lose my discipline. Perhaps some Beliefnet members will remember me from a time when I was more active in this forum.
I really wish to resume my practice. I'm at a moment in my life when I need to be the most focused and sensible in my decisions.
How does one return to a consistent meditation practice? How does one get back to applying Right Action in everyday life? How does one regain the strength and motivation to live as truthfully as possible?
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9 years ago  ::  Jan 16, 2009 - 10:52AM #2
bshmr
Posts: 14
I recieved this this morning:


January 16, 2009; Tricycle's Daily Dharma
Jon Kabat-Zinn on talking about meditation

If you do decide to start meditating, there's no need to tell other people about it, or talk about why you are doing it or what it's doing for you. In fact, there is no better way to waste your nascent energy and     ....



Other than that, my first reaction, days ago, was along the lines of this hypothetical: Last night your sight sense was NOT used during sleep, though this morning you opened and benefited from using your eyes (after not having done so for 30,000 seconds). How does one do that?

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9 years ago  ::  Jan 17, 2009 - 5:55PM #3
maddieerika
Posts: 1
Dear Neuroman,

I had fallen into the same situation a while ago and knew that I needed too begin the process again. I just started meditating by using some assistance with guided imagery CDs and other tools on this site. This was very helpful too begin my meditation. All I needed was too practice my meditation, in any body position and then I realized how peaceful and happy I felt.

I was becoming more mindful and clear again. Hopefully you should feel this right away. Especially if u were meditating so often before. You know what to do and the benefits of doing this. Just implement it into your schedule were you have some time. You only need a few minutes. You will feel a sense of relief and happiness. It will bring it all back. I believe in you! Just begin now. Then focus on living within the present and a lot of your stress should, hopefully diminish. This is what I believe from my own personal experience.

I wish you the best.
Erika
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9 years ago  ::  Jan 25, 2009 - 12:21PM #4
etoro
Posts: 595
[QUOTE=NeuroMan;955292]It's been about two, or perhaps three years since the last time I did serious meditation. I have let myself lose my discipline. Perhaps some Beliefnet members will remember me from a time when I was more active in this forum.
I really wish to resume my practice. I'm at a moment in my life when I need to be the most focused and sensible in my decisions.
How does one return to a consistent meditation practice? How does one get back to applying Right Action in everyday life? How does one regain the strength and motivation to live as truthfully as possible?[/QUOTE]

Neuroman,

I would recommend trying the practice of chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, which is itself the core principle of wisdom of the wisdom of the Lotus Sutra itself. There are many reason for saying this.

Chanting itself is a very physical practice. It involves the fusion of the mind, body and the environment. Here the term environment points to the "object" of meditation itself. The object of meditation itself is the object of wisdom. The object of wisdom is the Buddhas wisdom as it is expounded in the Lotus Sutra. This object of wisdom is therefore actually non-dualistic and embodies both the true nature of oneself and environment. 

The phrase itself embodies the wisdom of the prajna paramita in its most direct form. This is because the Lotus Sutra is the full expression of Prajna Paramita.  Naysayers who are unfamiliar with this practice, who have no experience with this practice of Buddhist faith generally engage in a reification of the phrase without a clue as to its actual meaning and fall into the mistaken mindset that they are refuting some thing or another. Yet they fail to grasp the "thing" itself.   And so in the end what they are really attacking are the people who pracftice it.  This practice of attacking practitioners of the Lotus Sutra itself is a non-Buddhist activity. Therefore those who wish to practice this teaching should eliminate all doubts as to its truth and efficacy for it is the embodiment of the Buddha's mind of wisdom itself.   

Those who wish to chant this phrase and practice meditation can also do both. This itself is most effective. The important thing however is that one must also study the tenets of this system.

Nichiren states, that chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo is the "greatest joy among joys".

Chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo is also an objective practice. It is concrete. Therefore you will not loose your way. You will be directed to an ever deeper understanding through the workings of your own mind.

Gassho
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9 years ago  ::  Jan 25, 2009 - 12:21PM #5
etoro
Posts: 595
[QUOTE=NeuroMan;955292]It's been about two, or perhaps three years since the last time I did serious meditation. I have let myself lose my discipline. Perhaps some Beliefnet members will remember me from a time when I was more active in this forum.
I really wish to resume my practice. I'm at a moment in my life when I need to be the most focused and sensible in my decisions.
How does one return to a consistent meditation practice? How does one get back to applying Right Action in everyday life? How does one regain the strength and motivation to live as truthfully as possible?[/QUOTE]

Neuroman,

I would recommend trying the practice of chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, which is itself the core principle of wisdom of the wisdom of the Lotus Sutra itself. There are many reason for saying this.

Chanting itself is a very physical practice. It involves the fusion of the mind, body and the environment. Here the term environment points to the "object" of meditation itself. The object of meditation itself is the object of wisdom. The object of wisdom is the Buddhas wisdom as it is expounded in the Lotus Sutra. This object of wisdom is therefore actually non-dualistic and embodies both the true nature of oneself and environment. 

The phrase itself embodies the wisdom of the prajna paramita in its most direct form. This is because the Lotus Sutra is the full expression of Prajna Paramita.  Naysayers who are unfamiliar with this practice, who have no experience with this practice of Buddhist faith generally engage in a reification of the phrase without a clue as to its actual meaning and fall into the mistaken mindset that they are refuting some thing or another. Yet they fail to grasp the "thing" itself.   And so in the end what they are really attacking are the people who pracftice it.  This practice of attacking practitioners of the Lotus Sutra itself is a non-Buddhist activity. Therefore those who wish to practice this teaching should eliminate all doubts as to its truth and efficacy for it is the embodiment of the Buddha's mind of wisdom itself.   

Those who wish to chant this phrase and practice meditation can also do both. This itself is most effective. The important thing however is that one must also study the tenets of this system.

Nichiren states, that chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo is the "greatest joy among joys".

Chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo is also an objective practice. It is concrete. Therefore you will not loose your way. You will be directed to an ever deeper understanding through the workings of your own mind.

Gassho
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8 years ago  ::  Jun 06, 2009 - 2:45PM #6
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 973

Dec 14, 2008 -- 12:43AM, NeuroMan wrote:

It's been about two, or perhaps three years since the last time I did serious meditation. I have let myself lose my discipline. Perhaps some Beliefnet members will remember me from a time when I was more active in this forum. I really wish to resume my practice. I'm at a moment in my life when I need to be the most focused and sensible in my decisions. How does one return to a consistent meditation practice? How does one get back to applying Right Action in everyday life? How does one regain the strength and motivation to live as truthfully as possible?



There must be a reason why you began to carry out serious meditation, initially. It may be pertinent for you to think about your original reasons for meditation. Such reasons remembered may inspire you to begin again.

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