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Switch to Forum Live View National Cathedral a Site for Muslim Prayer
3 years ago  ::  Nov 15, 2014 - 8:30AM #1
Nino0814
Posts: 1,795

www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/11/nation...

I am surprised that muslims would feel comfortable worshipping in the cathedral with all the carved images of saints.  The muslim who led the worship said the cathredral reminds him of a mosque.  

Does this event mean we have entered:
1. a new relationship between muslims and christians in the USA?
2. an irreversible decline of Epsicopalian influence in the USA? 
3. a new means for supporting TEC's expense real estate?
4. into nothing new, it just more of the same?
5. _____________ (your thoughts would be appreciated)

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3 years ago  ::  Nov 15, 2014 - 10:26AM #2
RJMcElwain
Posts: 3,013

Nov 15, 2014 -- 8:30AM, Nino0814 wrote:


www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/11/nation...

I am surprised that muslims would feel comfortable worshipping in the cathedral with all the carved images of saints.  The muslim who led the worship said the cathredral reminds him of a mosque.  

Does this event mean we have entered:
1. a new relationship between muslims and christians in the USA?
2. an irreversible decline of Epsicopalian influence in the USA? 
3. a new means for supporting TEC's expense real estate?
4. into nothing new, it just more of the same?
5. _____________ (your thoughts would be appreciated)




Today, there are several articles about this. As I recall, all faiths have been welcomed at the National Cathedral for a very long time, including Hindus, Buddhists and all other legitimate faiths. I've always assumed that Muslims were already on the list. So, is this just because of recent events?

Robert J. McElwain

"The strongest reason for people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." (Supposedly)Thomas Jefferson

"He who is not angry when there is just cause for anger is immoral."
St. Thomas Aquinas

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors. Plato
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 15, 2014 - 11:42AM #3
RJMcElwain
Posts: 3,013

Here is a paragraph taken from the Cathedral website:



Welcoming people of all faiths


Cathedral Image


The Cathedral is a spiritual resource for our nation: a great and beautiful edifice in the city of Washington, an indispensable ministry for people of all faiths and perspectives, and a sacred place for our country in times of celebration, crisis, and sorrow. Generous friends, members, and donors around the world support our mission.


Robert J. McElwain

"The strongest reason for people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." (Supposedly)Thomas Jefferson

"He who is not angry when there is just cause for anger is immoral."
St. Thomas Aquinas

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors. Plato
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 15, 2014 - 12:05PM #4
Dutch777
Posts: 9,144

I'll go with  number 5: "nutsville".  The Muslims have their own mosque; they don't need to pray in the SS. Peter and Paul Cathedral. I'll bet my head that Christians wouldn't be permitted to celebrate the HE in the local mosque.  My thoughts beyond this point wouldn't get past the Beliefnet Ascended Masters That Dwelleth in Shambala.  Ministering to all faiths doesn't mean allowing them to conduct their own services there.  Besides, who decides what is a "legitimate" religion and what is not ?


Utter Nutsville.

The Path
To Moon
lake
Doesn't Go
There.

So Walk
Your own
DharmaPath
And Be
Mindful

Dutch
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 15, 2014 - 3:34PM #5
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,483

Nov 15, 2014 -- 12:05PM, Dutch777 wrote:


I'll go with  number 5: "nutsville".  The Muslims have their own mosque; they don't need to pray in the SS. Peter and Paul Cathedral. I'll bet my head that Christians wouldn't be permitted to celebrate the HE in the local mosque.  My thoughts beyond this point wouldn't get past the Beliefnet Ascended Masters That Dwelleth in Shambala.  Ministering to all faiths doesn't mean allowing them to conduct their own services there.  Besides, who decides what is a "legitimate" religion and what is not ?


Utter Nutsville.





That's true Dutch. There are some people who think all Religions are not legitimate.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2014 - 11:18PM #6
holst
Posts: 245

But does it matter that Christians might not be allowed to worship in a Mosque?  This was an act of Christians reaching out in an act of love and openness, wasn't it?


I know it looked like a bit of a publisity stunt, but I think it was a sincere gesture.  If other faiths did likewise, that could really be a good thing

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3 years ago  ::  Nov 25, 2014 - 8:31AM #7
RJMcElwain
Posts: 3,013

Nov 24, 2014 -- 11:18PM, holst wrote:


But does it matter that Christians might not be allowed to worship in a Mosque?  This was an act of Christians reaching out in an act of love and openness, wasn't it?


I know it looked like a bit of a publisity stunt, but I think it was a sincere gesture.  If other faiths did likewise, that could really be a good thing




Well stated. I agree. And it further points out the wide gulf within the larger Muslim community, where the great majority oppose the violence of a small minority.

Robert J. McElwain

"The strongest reason for people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." (Supposedly)Thomas Jefferson

"He who is not angry when there is just cause for anger is immoral."
St. Thomas Aquinas

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors. Plato
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 27, 2014 - 12:51PM #8
MsTopaz
Posts: 407

Nov 24, 2014 -- 11:18PM, holst wrote:


But does it matter that Christians might not be allowed to worship in a Mosque?  This was an act of Christians reaching out in an act of love and openness, wasn't it?


I know it looked like a bit of a publisity stunt, but I think it was a sincere gesture.  If other faiths did likewise, that could really be a good thing




I agree. I thought it was lovely. 

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3 years ago  ::  Nov 27, 2014 - 3:22PM #9
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,483

Nov 27, 2014 -- 12:51PM, MsTopaz wrote:


Nov 24, 2014 -- 11:18PM, holst wrote:


But does it matter that Christians might not be allowed to worship in a Mosque?  This was an act of Christians reaching out in an act of love and openness, wasn't it?


I know it looked like a bit of a publisity stunt, but I think it was a sincere gesture.  If other faiths did likewise, that could really be a good thing




I agree. I thought it was lovely. 




Likewise i don't see the problem.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry
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