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Locked: Can one be Catholic and Buddhist at the same time?
4 years ago  ::  Feb 16, 2014 - 5:44PM #21
soma77
Posts: 256

Feb 16, 2014 -- 1:26AM, Mysty101 wrote:


The question was "Can one be Catholic & Budhist at the same time?"   The answer (according to Catholic teaching which is the guideline of this forum) is "No".





Is this the eleventh commandment? Jesus was Jewish and not Catholic so we have Catholics here judging others according to their religious practice. Others judge Catholics and say they are not Christian so if we judge thenm then we are judged in the same way.




Wayne Dyer
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4 years ago  ::  Feb 16, 2014 - 8:39PM #22
Mysty101
Posts: 2,025

This is a CATHOLIC Christian forum.  The guideline is CATHOLIC  teaching.  There are many other forums which discuss the merits of other religions.  Please keep this in mind as you post.


Thanks

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4 years ago  ::  Feb 17, 2014 - 2:23AM #23
soma77
Posts: 256
Feb 16, 2014 -- 2:26AM, Mysty101 wrote:

The question was "Can one be Catholic & Budhist at the same time?"   The answer (according to Catholic teaching which is the guideline of this forum) is "No".


The United States Conference of Catholic Bishopss published this document.


The USCCB's CEIA continues to be involved in a consulting and/or participatory fashion in a number of these local initiatives and networks, according to invitation, interest, need and availability, and continues to have the opportunity to collaborate with the Buddhist community in a wide-range of activities.   Dr. Anthony Cirelli is currently the lead staff of the USCCB Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs' on-going relationship with the Buddhist community on a national level.


“May we together promote a healthy relationship between human beings and the environment. By enhancing our efforts to promote ecological consciousness for serenity and peaceful coexistence, we can give witness to a respectful way of life that finds meaning not in having more, but in being more. By sharing the insights and commitments of our respective religious traditions, we can contribute to the well- being of our world.”


-Message published by the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue on t

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4 years ago  ::  Feb 17, 2014 - 7:48AM #24
Mysty101
Posts: 2,025

Feb 17, 2014 -- 2:23AM, soma77 wrote:


Feb 16, 2014 -- 2:26AM, Mysty101 wrote:

The question was "Can one be Catholic & Budhist at the same time?"   The answer (according to Catholic teaching which is the guideline of this forum) is "No".


The United States Conference of Catholic Bishopss published this document.


The USCCB's CEIA continues to be involved in a consulting and/or participatory fashion in a number of these local initiatives and networks, according to invitation, interest, need and availability, and continues to have the opportunity to collaborate with the Buddhist community in a wide-range of activities.   Dr. Anthony Cirelli is currently the lead staff of the USCCB Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs' on-going relationship with the Buddhist community on a national level.


“May we together promote a healthy relationship between human beings and the environment. By enhancing our efforts to promote ecological consciousness for serenity and peaceful coexistence, we can give witness to a respectful way of life that finds meaning not in having more, but in being more. By sharing the insights and commitments of our respective religious traditions, we can contribute to the well- being of our world.”


-Message published by the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue on t




ecological consciousness for serenity and peaceful coexistence,


This does not mean joining another Faith.  I know other faiths have many wonderful aspects, but also teachings that are not in communion with the Catholic Church--reincarnation for example.


If you have documentation of official Catholic teaching (Code of Canon Law, Catechism, etc) that states it is ok to be Catholic and another faith, please provide it. 


This is not a debate forum.  Please respect the guidelines.


Mysty 101


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4 years ago  ::  Feb 17, 2014 - 8:01AM #25
belleo
Posts: 2,887

And Pope John Paul 11 had much to say about Buddhism



...For this reason it is not inappropriate to caution those Christians who enthusiastically welcome certain ideas originating in the religious traditions of the Far East—for example, techniques and methods of meditation and ascetical practice. In some quarters these have become fashionable, and are accepted rather uncritically. First one should know one’s own spiritual heritage well and consider whether it is right to set it aside lightly. Here we need to recall, if only in passing, the brief but important document of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith “on certain aspects of Christian meditation” (10/15/1989). Here we find a clear answer to the question “whether and how [Christian prayer] can be enriched by methods of meditation originating in different religions and cultures”.



Second, relating Buddhism to the New Age movement and its Gnostic aspects, the Pope wrote:



A separate issue is the return of ancient gnostic ideas under the guise of the so-called New Age. We cannot delude ourselves that this will lead toward a renewal of religion. It is only a new way of practicing gnosticism—that attitude of the spirit that, in the name of a profound knowledge of God, results in distorting His Word and replacing it with purely human words. Gnosticism never completely abandoned the realm of Christianity. Instead, it has always existed side by side with Christianity, sometimes taking the shape of a philosophical movement, but more often assuming the characteristics of a religion or para-religion in distinct, if not declared, conflict with all that is essentially Christian.



By means of these and other articulate remarks, the Holy Father clearly drew a sharp line between Buddhism and Christianity, rejecting any notion that the two are of like purpose and insisting that Buddhist principles are to be gravely cautioned against.


Interestingly, some critics of the Pope’s remarks stated with vigor that Buddhism is not “atheistic”. Counter attacks varied. One Buddhist commented in rebuttal that followers of Buddha believe that he was the “teacher of gods and men”, and that some Buddhists believe in multiple deities or spirits that look after the affairs of both men and nature. Others pointed out that certain teachings of Buddha specifically point to an uncreated being without which nothing would be in existence.


Please note that though these arguments object to the Pope’s characterization of Buddhism, they in fact do nothing to bring it closer to Catholicism...



Just me
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4 years ago  ::  Feb 17, 2014 - 8:48AM #26
Mysty101
Posts: 2,025

Marie,


Thanks for posting that .


SuZ

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4 years ago  ::  Feb 17, 2014 - 3:38PM #27
soma77
Posts: 256

VATICAN CITY, MARCH 31, 2011 (Zenit.org).- The Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue is underlining the quest for truth shared by Christians and Buddhists and strengthened by religious liberty.


In a message to Buddhists on the occasion of the 2,557th anniversary of Buddha’s birth, South Korea’s leading prelate paid tribute to Buddhism’s “spirituality of love and sharing.”


“Our society is full of various conflicts and divisions,” Archbishop Andrew Yeom Soo-jung of Seoul said in his message. “We are faced with problems such as the rise of materialism and atheism, and the lack of moral values.”




Fall 2000 | NEAR THE END OF HIS LIFE, the American Christian monk, poet, social critic and mystic, Thomas Merton said that he wanted “to become as good a Buddhist as I can” (Steindl-Rast, 1969).

Mass celebrated in Buddhist temple

May 23-26, 2003 - A priest preaches to Catholic nuns, who gather for a retreat at the Hsi Lai Buddhist Temple (Hacienda Heights, CA).

Behind the priest, an altar to celebrate the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is set up in front of the statue of Buddha.

Trappist priest as instructor of Zen in Massachusetts

Trappist priest Kevin Hunt (70), on his knees, is installed by his master
Jesuit Fr. Robert Kennedy, as the first American Trappist instructor of Zen.

Mother Teresa worshipping Buddha



October 7, 1975 - At left, in Calcutta, Mother Teresa worships Buddha in a ceremony of thanksgiving for the 25th anniversary of the Missionaries of Charity. She is the first on the left, recollected in profound prayer. At right, another close-up from the same ceremony.

www.traditioninaction.org/RevolutionPhot...





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4 years ago  ::  Feb 17, 2014 - 8:45PM #28
Mysty101
Posts: 2,025

This is NOT Catholic teaching. These are examples of unofficial services. As I said this is not  a debate forum.


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4 years ago  ::  Feb 17, 2014 - 9:35PM #29
soma77
Posts: 256

I am not debating. I gave you examples of a Catholic saint, Archbishop, The Pontifical Council, Catholic monk, priests and nuns who feel diferently than you about Buddhism. You made a statement about Buddhism and these Catholic leaders recognized for their spiritual discernment have a different view about Buddhism. Let the people read your statement and Catholic leaders who have a different views about buddhism. Your judgement is that it is wrong to learn from Buddhism and these CAtholic spiritual leaders think it makes Catholics better Christians.

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4 years ago  ::  Feb 19, 2014 - 8:01AM #30
Mysty101
Posts: 2,025

1. I don't think you are understanding the difference between an unofficial position by an individial  and the official Catholic teaching. (I would like to know the whole story behind the "Mass" in the Budhist Temple, and if here were any reprocusssions regarding that---you may start another thread, if you have more on that) I have attended many ecumenical services, but I am not saying I am Jewish or a Protestant religion---I am Catholic.


2. I don't think you understand the difference between recognizing the good aspects of any religion, and professing to be a Budhist.


I did acknowledge the good.  That being said, I think this discussion has reached the end of its productivity according to official Cathing teaching, which is the guideline of this forum.


If you wish to discuss other religions, please start another thread.


Mysty 101


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