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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 2:37PM #1
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,355
Does anyone remember this print ad from 1986? 
"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 3:21PM #2
Nino0814
Posts: 1,715

I do not recall seeing it, but I think it communicates the wrong message.  It supports the idea that Anglicanism's founder was HenryVIII.   It was Jesus Christ, and the saints who followed Jesus Christ, who first brought the gospel to England.

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 3:50PM #3
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,355

Well it was founded by King Henry the VIII.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 4:51PM #4
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Henry's divorce was not the cause of the break between Rome and Canterbury, but rather the occasion.


Things were breaking apart beween Rome and London for decades if not for centuries before Henry VIII.

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 4:59PM #5
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,355

Apr 28, 2012 -- 4:13PM, Nino0814 wrote:


Apr 28, 2012 -- 3:50PM, Jupiter6208 wrote:


Well it was founded by King Henry the VIII.




Jupiter,



That is not how I understand the Church nor the history of it in England.


The Church was in England before Henry the VIII.   The theological arguments for the separation from Papal authority were crafted by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, who was appointed by Henry the VIII and confirmed by the Pope.  


The later incorporation of some protestant ideas came after Henry VIII, but that did not change the Church.  Henry never repudiated the Church and re-establish it [like The Watchtower, or Joseph Smith], nor did any future monarch.   The Church is a living organism who life comes from Christ; no matter what reforms in doctrine or organization take place.




I stand corrected. That's what i get for watching the Tudors for historical accuracy...

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 5:07PM #6
GRobit625
Posts: 1,976

I liked the Tudors. Part of the reason for Henry's transgressions was that he was ignorant about what determines the sex of the child. I bet if he knew that it was the man that carries the determining X and Y chromosome he probably wouldn't have done that. And I'm also willing to bet that England would have broke off with Rome regardless.

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 5:38PM #7
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,355

Yes it was a great series!  I would like to have that on DVD.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 6:57PM #8
Spokang
Posts: 941

Apr 28, 2012 -- 4:51PM, Roodog wrote:


Henry's divorce was not the cause of the break between Rome and Canterbury, but rather the occasion.


Things were breaking apart beween Rome and London for decades if not for centuries before Henry VIII.




Roodog, you have stated the situation perfectly.  The divorce was the occasion of the break, not the reason.


I'm slogging through an excellent biography of Cranmer now.  It details Cranmer's path from slavish papist during his years at Cambridge to avid reformer as priest and bishop.  (He actually got married while still a Roman priest and before the split.) Long before the issue of divorce arose, Cranmer, while at Cambridge, had been in conversation with Protestant divines in Europe on the key elements of docrtinal reform, as well as with reformists at Cambridge.  Initially, he was very much in the papal anti-annulment/divorce camp, but by the time he was appointed to study and document grounds for divorce or annulment, he and many other bishops and priests in the English Church were pushing for a break from Rome.


Here is a link to the biography. Extremely detailed, chocked through and through with minutia of his life.


www.amazon.com/Thomas-Cranmer-Dr-Diarmai...


Jim

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 8:31PM #9
Dutch777
Posts: 9,113

Jim,


Diarmaid MacCulloch is an excellent historian.  He's a deacon in the CoE but has refused ordination to the priesthood because of the Church's stance on Gayness; he's Gay.


I read his History of Christianity: the First Three Thousand Years.  The book is massive, so the library gave me a whole month to read it, which is a "first ever" with those library gremlins.


When my reading schedule is somewhat cleared, I'll phone the library to determine if they have the Cranmer book.

The Path
To Moon Lake
Doesn't Go
There.

So Walk
Your own Dharma*Path
And Be
Mindful

Dutch
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 10:57PM #10
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Apr 28, 2012 -- 6:57PM, Spokang wrote:


Apr 28, 2012 -- 4:51PM, Roodog wrote:


Henry's divorce was not the cause of the break between Rome and Canterbury, but rather the occasion.


Things were breaking apart beween Rome and London for decades if not for centuries before Henry VIII.




Roodog, you have stated the situation perfectly.  The divorce was the occasion of the break, not the reason.


I'm slogging through an excellent biography of Cranmer now.  It details Cranmer's path from slavish papist during his years at Cambridge to avid reformer as priest and bishop.  (He actually got married while still a Roman priest and before the split.) Long before the issue of divorce arose, Cranmer, while at Cambridge, had been in conversation with Protestant divines in Europe on the key elements of docrtinal reform, as well as with reformists at Cambridge.  Initially, he was very much in the papal anti-annulment/divorce camp, but by the time he was appointed to study and document grounds for divorce or annulment, he and many other bishops and priests in the English Church were pushing for a break from Rome.


Here is a link to the biography. Extremely detailed, chocked through and through with minutia of his life.


www.amazon.com/Thomas-Cranmer-Dr-Diarmai...


Jim





The English Crown and the Papacy had been feuding since the turn of the 14th Century when Edward Longshanks and Boniface VIII were giving each other the finger some 250 years before their "divorce".

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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