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Switch to Forum Live View Protestant needs help from a Catholic!
3 years ago  ::  Nov 27, 2011 - 5:36PM #1
mettamommy
Posts: 2
Blessings, 
I grew up in the Mainline Protestant tradtion. I attend a liberal United Methodist Church, fits me pretty well, etc. However!

I have fallen in love with Catholic Mass!

It's pretty common knowledge in the Protestant church that Catholicism has really hit the mark as far as creating a worship experience that is saturated with mystery, praise, and respect, in a way that we really haven't been able to capture.

My question is this: Do I convert? Do I become involved in the Catholic faith? My daughter goes to Sunday School at our UMC church. I'm not sure I can go back now that I've been opened to this new (to me) way of worship. I know theologically that few Catholics would approve of my beliefs, and I ask this in utmost respect of your faith. Can I attend Masses and still continue my membership at a UMC church? 

Thanks for you input.

Christ's peace be with you! 
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 27, 2011 - 5:50PM #2
Mysty101
Posts: 2,020

Hi,


Welcome to the forum.


Catholic teaching says that all are very welcome at a Catholic Mass.  The Church is strengthened by all who worship at Her services.  However, the Church has different guidelines for the reception of Holy Communion.


For our fellow Christians: We welcome our fellow Christians to this celebration of the Eucharist as our brothers and sisters.  We pray that our common baptism and the action of the Holy Spirit in this Eucharist will draw us closer to one another and begin to dispel the sad divisions which separate us.  We pray that these will lessen and finally disappear, in keeping with Christ's prayer for us "that they may all be one" (Jn 17:21).


Because Catholics believe that the celebration of the Eucharist is a sign of the reality of the oneness of faith, life and worship, members of those churches with whom we are not yet fully united are ordinarily not admitted to Holy Communion.  Eucharistic sharing in exceptional circumstances by other Christians requires permission according to the directives of the diocesan bishop and the provisions of canon law (CIC 844.4). Members of the Orthodox churches, the Assyrian Church of the East and the Polish National Catholic Church are urged to respect the discipline of their own churches.  According to Roman Catholic discipline, the Code of Canon Law does not object to reception of communion by Christians of these churches (CIC 844.3).


Thanks for stopping in, and please come here with any other questions.


Love & Prayers,


SuZ


 


 

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3 years ago  ::  Nov 27, 2011 - 6:11PM #3
mettamommy
Posts: 2

Thank you! 


so...what if I DO want to become Catholic? I don't agree with all that the Church teaches, but I do agree with it's Eucharist, and its mysticism. I would definitely be a "liberal" catholic, although very dedicated. 


Any liberal Catholics out there? 

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3 years ago  ::  Nov 27, 2011 - 6:58PM #4
Mysty101
Posts: 2,020

Hi again,


If you are considering embracing the Catholic Faith, why not call your local parish office?  You could attend the classes for converts, even if you have not made a firm decision.  Perhaps some deeper understanding of Catholicism would help you decide.


Suz

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2 years ago  ::  May 04, 2012 - 1:57AM #5
headhuntersix
Posts: 63

Nov 27, 2011 -- 6:11PM, mettamommy wrote:


 I don't agree with all that the Church teaches





 From my own limited understanding, I'd guess that your soul is better off outside the Church.  See, as I understand it, you don't have to be Catholic to be saved... but if you are Catholic, you do have to abide by Church teachings.  Putting two and two together, I'd say that a non-Catholic who accepts 95% of what the Church teaches is in a better position than a Catholic who rejects 5%.  The only down side is that you can't go to communion, but except for that little detail, you'd be perfectly free to worship with us. 


 


Converting "cause you like the smells'n'bells" is a very bad idea because it would be only a superficial conversion (as evidenced by refusal to accept all of the Church's teachings).  I recommend that you look into RCIA.  That's the "so you want to explore possibly converting" class that's already been mentioned, and it should help you figure things out.


 


Nov 27, 2011 -- 6:11PM, mettamommy wrote:


Any liberal Catholics out there?




 


Plenty.  Of course, most (not all) of them are Catholic in name only...

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