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6 years ago  ::  Nov 20, 2011 - 10:33PM #1
0615sakura
Posts: 3
Hi everyone,

I have a simple question. I know there are many exRC here. I am now an Episcopalian who was a exRC who very regularly attended daily Mass.

Are there those who are now episcopalian but who occasionally go to daily mass at RC?

I miss attending daily mass as RC.


Jason
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 21, 2011 - 10:11AM #2
Dutch777
Posts: 9,144

Nov 20, 2011 -- 10:33PM, 0615sakura wrote:

Hi everyone,

I have a simple question. I know there are many exRC here. I am now an Episcopalian who was a exRC who very regularly attended daily Mass.


Welcome Jason to the A/E board.  It's always a pleasure to meet a fellow XRC2TECie, of which there are many on this board.

Are there those who are now episcopalian but who occasionally go to daily mass at RC?


Every Sunday is a "mini-Easter", so the service of Holy Eucharist is appropriate for the Lord's Day.  Most parishes have morning and/or evening prayer during the week; many have a mid-week eucharist.  AFAIK, the daily H.E. is observed in cathedrals.


No, I don't attend any services in the RCC; I left that church completely.  Why not discuss your request with your priest?  There may be a group in your congregation that would be interested in a daily mass.  


May I ask what diocese you're in?




I miss attending daily mass as RC.


Jason




The Path
To Moon
lake
Doesn't Go
There.

So Walk
Your own
DharmaPath
And Be
Mindful

Dutch
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 21, 2011 - 10:48AM #3
0615sakura
Posts: 3

Dutch777,


Thank you for your welcome!


I live in the Diocese of Chicago and am a parishioner of an anglo-catholic parish in dowtown Chicago. I drive one hour every sunday to Church, so going to daily mass there every day is not very ideal even though they do celebrate mass every single day.


In the suburb I am currently in, the eucharist is celebrated on Sundays only.


Jason

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6 years ago  ::  Nov 21, 2011 - 11:47AM #4
JoanTreese
Posts: 2,531

I have from time to time gone to a weekly RC Mass. The RC Cathedral has a noon time Mass that I have attended. We also have a Roman Catholic Center in one of our malls that offers a noon time Mass. My parish does offer Morning Prayer with Eucharist 2 days per week along with bible study.

Joan

He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? [Micah 6:8]
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 23, 2011 - 9:49PM #5
JoanTreese
Posts: 2,531

The RCs may have closed communion but Jesus doesn't!

Joan

He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? [Micah 6:8]
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2011 - 12:59AM #6
GRobit625
Posts: 2,006

It should at least be reserved for the baptized but people want to get rid of that too. You're doing the non-baptized a disservice if you ask me. Jesus didn't just take anyone off the street for the Last Supper either.  And honestly, I wouldn't want to receive in the RCC because of theological reasons alone. Transubstantiation doesn't add up to me, real presence yes but actual body and blood,no.

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6 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2011 - 7:03AM #7
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,483

Nov 24, 2011 -- 12:59AM, GRobit625 wrote:


It should at least be reserved for the baptized but people want to get rid of that too. You're doing the non-baptized a disservice if you ask me. Jesus didn't just take anyone off the street for the Last Supper either.  And honestly, I wouldn't want to receive in the RCC because of theological reasons alone. Transubstantiation doesn't add up to me, real presence yes but actual body and blood,no.





GRobit,



I agree with you on the actual Body and blood part and i think you do need to be Baptized.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2011 - 9:11AM #8
Dutch777
Posts: 9,144

Nino,


I'm really conflicted about this; I'm still wrestling with this matter.


First of all, yes, I do consider Salvationists and Quakers Christian even though they do not practice the two dominical sacraments.  They accept Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior but I'm perplexed as to why they just don't practice His stated sacraments.


My tentative position is that normatively the HE should be reserved for baptized Christians; the non-baptized may come forward for a blessing.  If they are deeply moved to receive the HE, they should enter "inquirers' class" in preparation for becoming part of the Body of Christ.  Nevertheless, if they come forward for the HE, they may be prompted by the Holy Spirit --- so who am I to say "no"?


Centuries ago, the Presbyterian Church of Scotland issued "communion tokens" to be collected by the elders from members-in-good-standing of the church.  This disqualified in a discernable way the non-eligable from receiving communion.  I think this is a bit too much. Surprised

The Path
To Moon
lake
Doesn't Go
There.

So Walk
Your own
DharmaPath
And Be
Mindful

Dutch
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2011 - 10:42AM #9
GRobit625
Posts: 2,006

But it's more than being moved....it's about self-examination as well. There are quite a few days when I'll just go up for a blessing. I don't consider the Eucharist as an entitlement. It's a gift like salvation is. If you're "moved" to receive communion, you're moved to talk to the priest about accepting Christ and getting baptized. Like I said, Jesus didn't just pick up anyone off the street for the Last Supper. These people, the disciples,  willingly followed Him and obeyed Him. It's not a hospitality issue. If this issue ever comes in the General Conviction, for the Church's sake I hope they vote it down overwhelmingly, show the world we still have some Christian discipline.

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6 years ago  ::  Nov 25, 2011 - 7:47AM #10
Cuileann
Posts: 9

Our minister (priest? which one do you guys use more? And I have to say it's a bit weird to have priests that aren't fathers - to the point where I've barely caught myself from saying "Good morning Father" to a female priest on the way out. I guess my brain has robes=Father imprinted somewhere.)


Anyhow the ordained religious leader who lead the inquiry sessions I attened mentioned that there are two valid traditions around communion - the Last Supper where Jesus us with a few and the Loaves and the Fishes where Jesus wasn't picky about who he fed. Of course we remember the Last Supper when we have communion, but they more I think of it, could you use that same logic to exclude women from communion? Our church goes with the latter and encourages anyone seeking a relationship with Christ to have communion, which took a while to wrap my brains around.


Actually the hardest wasn't so much the idea that an unbaptised adult can take communion, but that my baptised children can. There's no first communion, no little white dress, nothing like that. The kids can just take communion. That really took some coming to terms with, but my kids love it. Well, my five year old loves it; my two year old seems fine taking communion, but he gets more excited when they have percussion instruments to pick up afterwards. I swear he's not a macho little guy, but he ALWAYS goes for the sticks.


Anyhow, it's something that I love - that my kids are welcome at the table, though I can't say my son or even my daughter has a better understanding of communion or better connection to Christ than an adult seeking baptism.


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