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Switch to Forum Live View Kindly direct me to a Church that teaches this.
7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 10:56AM #1
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,483
www.beliefnet.com/Inspiration/If-the-Chu...
"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 11:09AM #2
teilhard
Posts: 53,304

The Roman Catholic Church, hands-down ...


See, e.g., St. Francis of Assisi, Mother Teresa of Calcutta, et al. ...

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 11:17AM #3
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,483

I guess you didn't read the whole thing...

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 11:56AM #4
teilhard
Posts: 53,304

Nope ... Just the Part about "following Jesus," which is BIG in The Catholic Communion ...


Apr 7, 2011 -- 11:17AM, Jupiter6208 wrote:


I guess you didn't read the whole thing...





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7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 12:46PM #5
WannabeTheo
Posts: 401

Apr 7, 2011 -- 10:56AM, Jupiter6208 wrote:

www.beliefnet.com/Inspiration/If-the-Chu...



Every point made in that article?  The only one that comes to mind is Unitarian Universalism. 


Most of the points can be applied to many liberal mainline protestant denominations, to various degrees, like the UCC, TEC, ELCA ...


All except the first point:


"If the church were Christian, Jesus would be a model for living, not an object of worship."


In all Christian denominations I am familiar with Jesus is both.  Jesus is certainly worshipped in all Lutheran denominations.  The idea that God took the initiative to come to us and live among us as Jesus is essential to Lutheranism.  The idea that he was an exceptional human and role model but nothing more is alien to Lutheranism and any expression of Christianity I am familiar with.


The remaining points are pretty good.  I would comment on the second point that when it comes to human potential; I affirm human potential as coming from God.  I do not affirm any form of human potential which is independent from God.

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 1:00PM #6
WannabeTheo
Posts: 401

Apr 7, 2011 -- 12:46PM, WannabeTheo wrote:


Every point made in that article?  The only one that comes to mind is Unitarian Universalism.





Maybe (very) liberal Quakers also.

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 1:03PM #7
teilhard
Posts: 53,304

There was, Decades ago, a move toward so-called "Religion-less Christianity," as per "Modern" Guys like Bonhoeffer, Niebuhr, et al. ...


They meant well ... But I see no Problem or Contradiction in Affirming and Enacting BOTH  "Worship" AND "Life" ...

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 3:49PM #8
tawonda
Posts: 4,367

I don't understand the either/or mentality regarding Christian discipleship -- as others have said, why is it wrong to both worship Christ and follow Christ?


(Sidebar grumble: What is the animosity in contemporary Christianity toward worship -- i.e., acknowledging and humbing oneself before the Divine Mystery -- anyway? Our church is trying to make Sunday services more "family-friendly," and one perception I can't help picking up from the twenty- and thirty-somethings is that worship is an onerous burden that becomes almost intolerable for families. Really? Is that worship's fault? Or maybe some laypeople and preachers/teachers have lost their grasp of the truth that "It is right to give God thanks and praise."

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 8:08PM #9
WannabeTheo
Posts: 401

Apr 7, 2011 -- 3:49PM, tawonda wrote:


(Sidebar grumble: What is the animosity in contemporary Christianity toward worship -- i.e., acknowledging and humbing oneself before the Divine Mystery -- anyway? Our church is trying to make Sunday services more "family-friendly," and one perception I can't help picking up from the twenty- and thirty-somethings is that worship is an onerous burden that becomes almost intolerable for families. Really? Is that worship's fault? Or maybe some laypeople and preachers/teachers have lost their grasp of the truth that "It is right to give God thanks and praise."





I think some people define 'worship' as groveling and begging for mercy.  I don't; I consider it a sincere response of loving and grateful praise to God, my creator, the source of my very existence, who loved his creation so much he became part of it, living and suffering and dying along with the rest of us so that we could share in his life.  I think that's worthy of worship and praise. 

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 10, 2011 - 2:00AM #10
TomeReader
Posts: 70

Apr 7, 2011 -- 3:49PM, tawonda wrote:

I don't understand the either/or mentality regarding Christian discipleship -- as others have said, why is it wrong to both worship Christ and follow Christ?


(Sidebar grumble: What is the animosity in contemporary Christianity toward worship -- i.e., acknowledging and humbing oneself before the Divine Mystery -- anyway? Our church is trying to make Sunday services more "family-friendly," and one perception I can't help picking up from the twenty- and thirty-somethings is that worship is an onerous burden that becomes almost intolerable for families. Really? Is that worship's fault? Or maybe some laypeople and preachers/teachers have lost their grasp of the truth that "It is right to give God thanks and praise."


Some people just want to be entertained on Sunday, instead of being challenged, comforted, educated...

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