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Switch to Forum Live View music in Presbyterian worship
8 years ago  ::  Sep 26, 2009 - 12:25PM #1
Dfg
Posts: 37

I've been posing this question to a few different faith communities and would like to hear what Presbyterians have to say. How would you describe the purpose of music in worship and what styles of music are most effective?

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8 years ago  ::  Oct 04, 2009 - 2:01AM #2
sterrettc
Posts: 89

The Book of Order -- Directory for Worship has the following:


Song is a response which engages the whole self in prayer. Song unites the faithful in common prayer wherever they gather for worship whether in church, home, or other special place. The covenant people have always used the gift of song to offer prayer. Psalms were created to be sung by the faithful as their response to God. Though they may be read responsively or in unison, their full power comes to expression when they are sung. In addition to psalms the Church in the New Testament sang hymns and spiritual songs. Through the ages and from varied cultures, the church has developed additional musical forms for congregational prayer. Congregations are encouraged to use these diverse musical forms for prayer as well as those which arise out of the musical life of their own cultures.

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8 years ago  ::  Nov 23, 2009 - 2:06PM #3
CalKnox
Posts: 330

The Directory for Worship of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church says:


"As it is the aim of public worship to glorify God, prayer and praise should predominate in congregational singing. Let every member of the church take part in this act of worship. It should be performed not merely with the lips but with the spirit and the understanding. Since the metrical versions of the Psalms are based upon the Word of God, they ought to be used frequently in public worship. Great care must be taken that all the materials of song are in perfect accord with the teaching of Holy Scripture. Let the tunes as well as the words be dignified and elevated. The stately rhythm of the choral is especially appropriate for public worship. No person shall take a special part in the musical service unless he is a professing Christian and adorns his profession with a godly walk."

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8 years ago  ::  Mar 17, 2010 - 3:43PM #4
Worldjusticeonearth1
Posts: 6

I've recently started attending a P.C.U.S.A. Church and we have traditional hymns that are wonderful and we sometimes have two high-school students who play the bagpipes. Music is very important for me and I love the Presbyterian Church.

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8 years ago  ::  Apr 01, 2010 - 10:30PM #5
CalKnox
Posts: 330

Historically, Presbyterians sang the Psalms, usually in metrical form, and had no musical or coral solos, nor choirs in public worship.


My wife and I were married in Scotland, with non-instrumental singing of Psalms in the worship service.  We had a piper outside the church to pipe the bride in, and the married couple out.


Presbyterians sometimes import bag pipes into their worship service thinking it is part of their Scottish heritage.  Historically, the Scots would not have considered such a practice.


Go to Youtube and search for metrical Psalm singing to hear the Presbyterian worship music of our heritage.

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8 years ago  ::  Apr 02, 2010 - 12:15PM #6
greenponder
Posts: 1,395

There is a good article in New Horizons April 2010 issue titled "Why God Wants Us To Sing". You can find it at www.opc.org/

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8 years ago  ::  Apr 03, 2010 - 3:59PM #7
CalKnox
Posts: 330

Yes, good article:


www.opc.org/nh.html?article_id=647


Thanks.


 

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8 years ago  ::  May 22, 2010 - 12:32PM #8
grampawombat
Posts: 269

There is a Presbyterian hymnal, for those who are interested in what most Presbyterians sing.

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7 years ago  ::  Jun 01, 2010 - 3:02PM #9
CalKnox
Posts: 330

The historical song book of English speaking Presbyterians was the Psalms of David in Metre of 1650, which may be found at:


www.swrb.com/newslett/actualNLs/Psalter0...


Interesting observations of the corruption of worship prior to the Reformation is found in the comment of Erasmus:


"We have brought into our churches certain operatic and theatrical music; such a confused, disorderly chattering of some words as I hardly think was ever in any of the Grecian or Roman theatres. The church rings with the noise of trumpets, pipes, and dulcimers; and human voices strive to bear their part with them. Men run to church as to a theatre, to have their ears tickled. And for this end organ makers are hired with great salaries, and a company of boys, who waste all their time learning these whining tones." (Erasmus, Commentary on I Cor. 14:19)


 


 


 

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7 years ago  ::  Jun 01, 2010 - 11:39PM #10
grampawombat
Posts: 269

Are you badmouthing the hymnal Cal? If so, what is the point to that? If not, whatever is the point to your quote?

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