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Switch to Forum Live View Question about the Divine Liturgy
9 years ago  ::  Aug 14, 2009 - 9:12AM #1
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068

In the Western Church, following the RCL, this Sunday (Aug 16) has a scripture reading from I Kings 3 re: Solomon becoming king, and his prayer for wisdom.


Which in a round about way got me thinking* about a line in the Divine Liturgy when the Deacon, just before the reading of the Gospel, says: "Wisdom, attend!" (Do I remember that right?) Could someone help me parse that statement. I don't have a copy of it in Greek, and my Koine is way rusty anyway.


Does this statement mean something like, "O Holy wisdom, be present with us." - an invocation of the Holy Spirit?


Or, does it mean something like, "Here are words of wisdom, attend/pay attention to what is being said"? To whom is this addressed? God? or the gathered Church?


I would guess that this is less ambiguous in the original than it is in translation.


 


 


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9 years ago  ::  Aug 15, 2009 - 7:09AM #2
anyuta64
Posts: 1,536

Aug 14, 2009 -- 9:12AM, Campbellite wrote:


In the Western Church, following the RCL, this Sunday (Aug 16) has a scripture reading from I Kings 3 re: Solomon becoming king, and his prayer for wisdom.


Which in a round about way got me thinking* about a line in the Divine Liturgy when the Deacon, just before the reading of the Gospel, says: "Wisdom, attend!" (Do I remember that right?) Could someone help me parse that statement. I don't have a copy of it in Greek, and my Koine is way rusty anyway.


Does this statement mean something like, "O Holy wisdom, be present with us." - an invocation of the Holy Spirit?


Or, does it mean something like, "Here are words of wisdom, attend/pay attention to what is being said"? To whom is this addressed? God? or the gathered Church?


I would guess that this is less ambiguous in the original than it is in translation.


 


 


*no wise cracks from the peanut gallery!





I don't know the original--just the Slavonic, but I'm fairly certain it's more allong the lines of your second quote, not your first. it's addressing the gathered people, not God.  "wisdom" is a call to pay attention to the important things that are about to follow.  if I'm not mistaken, it is taken directly from the old Jewish liturgy. 

Passion is inversely proportional to the amount of real information available.

NOTE: This post is a natural product. The sleight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual charicter and beauty and in no way are to be considered flaws or defects.
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9 years ago  ::  Aug 15, 2009 - 12:15PM #3
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068

Thank you, Anyuta. How might this be better rendered into English, then, to make it less ambiguous?

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9 years ago  ::  Aug 15, 2009 - 4:44PM #4
SeraphimR
Posts: 12,687

Aug 15, 2009 -- 12:15PM, Campbellite wrote:


Thank you, Anyuta. How might this be better rendered into English, then, to make it less ambiguous?




I've seen one translation:


"Wisdom! Let us be attentive."

“So long as there is squalor in the world, those obsessed with social justice feel obliged not only to live in it themselves but also to spread it evenly.”

http://takimag.com/article/the_ugly_truth_theodore_dalrymple
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9 years ago  ::  Aug 15, 2009 - 8:23PM #5
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068

Thank you, Seraphim. That is helpful.

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9 years ago  ::  Aug 18, 2009 - 4:50PM #6
KatherineOrthodixie
Posts: 3,689

"it's addressing the gathered people, not God.  "wisdom" is a call to pay attention to the important things that are about to follow."


Exactly so, as the quote seraphim provided also shows. It is an instruction to the people of God to pay attention.


 


(Or in the vernacular in my neck of the woods, "Listen up, y'all. This is important." )

“The Law of the Church is to give oneself to what is given not to seek one’s own.” Fr. Alexander Schmemann
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9 years ago  ::  Aug 19, 2009 - 8:32AM #7
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068

Aug 18, 2009 -- 4:50PM, KatherineOrthodixie wrote:


 "Listen up, y'all. This is important."




Well, why didn't y'all just say so. Cool

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9 years ago  ::  Aug 19, 2009 - 8:39AM #8
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068

And, in case any of y'all are interested, in the sermon I spoke of Solomon's prayer for Wisdom, the alternate OT reading from Proverbs about Wisdom making her bread and mixing her wine, and spreading her table and inviting the simple. The connection of Wisdom/Sophia > Logos/Word > Jesus Christ,who spreads his Table and offers Bread and Wine to us.

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9 years ago  ::  Aug 19, 2009 - 9:46PM #9
SeraphimR
Posts: 12,687

Aug 19, 2009 -- 8:39AM, Campbellite wrote:


And, in case any of y'all are interested, in the sermon I spoke of Solomon's prayer for Wisdom, the alternate OT reading from Proverbs about Wisdom making her bread and mixing her wine, and spreading her table and inviting the simple. The connection of Wisdom/Sophia > Logos/Word > Jesus Christ,who spreads his Table and offers Bread and Wine to us.




I find that interesting.


A correspondence between Sophia and Logos has been mentioned very occaisionally for quite a while.


I remember a thread on Monachos about it.  I can try to dig it up if you're interested.

“So long as there is squalor in the world, those obsessed with social justice feel obliged not only to live in it themselves but also to spread it evenly.”

http://takimag.com/article/the_ugly_truth_theodore_dalrymple
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