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Switch to Forum Live View Putting the fun into fundamentalism
8 years ago  ::  Jul 01, 2009 - 11:32PM #1
Tombrisson
Posts: 98

Does conservative or traditional mean the same as "fundamentalist"? In your view, what's the difference? Is it possible to be a liberal fundamentalist?


I think being a fundamentalist has a lot to do with attitude -- I'm right, you're wrong, "we" are thinkers, "they" are glassy-eyed followers, irrational and just don't get it. 


Sound familiar?

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8 years ago  ::  Jul 02, 2009 - 2:34AM #2
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Tombrisson, ol' buddy, ol'pal,


Just as the Vatican has ruined the word "Catholic" for some, the word "Fundamentalist" had been likewise ruined.


The word was derived from a series of books written by scholars, from all branches of Protestantism, in defense of the essensial  Protestant Christian doctrines found in the Confessions of the various Churches and the Creeds. These books were written in response to the creeping modernism that was invading Protestantism. This involved some of the brightest minds in mainline and evangelical Christianity in the Early Twentieth Century, I believe that Benjamin B. Warfield and G.Campbell Morgan were involved( I could be mistaken) Doctrines such as the Incarnation, Virgin Birth, The Atoning Death of Christ and the Bodily Resurrection among others were discussed and defended. What we are talking about here is orthodoxy in the Protestant Church. A lot of thought has gone into this over the past century. Orthodox Protestants are not mental midgets nor robots.

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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8 years ago  ::  Jul 02, 2009 - 11:15PM #3
Tombrisson
Posts: 98

Yeeeaaah, but I think I'm meaning more a quality of mind and heart than just belief. There are many people who believe what they believe and don't find it necessary to ridicule or convert others. 


I think faith demands openness to others, whether you agree or not with their beliefs. I count myself fortunate that many among my family and friends, Christians or not, liberals or conservatives, who just aren't constantly banging the drum for whatever. They're real humans, not recruiters for their biases.


Perhaps they're too busy in the stuff of real life -- working a job raising their kids, paying the bills -- to trash people.


They seem to know the difference between faith, belief and theology. They tend to be much more interested in faith than the other two. 


 

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8 years ago  ::  Jul 03, 2009 - 11:46AM #4
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

I am going to get into trouble on this one:


The Baptist Church is not for everyone. Neither is Anglicanism. The culture of the churches is not one size fit all. I had grown to love the classic simplicity of the Baptist/Presbyterian service. Some people love the elaborate trappings of Catholicism and High Church Anglicanism.


There are some sociological differences too, The Baptist Church seems and I do emphasize "seems" to be more "American working class" and more in line with my culture.I had found some Anglican and Episcopal churches to be a bit aristocratic, maybe because of their English roots.

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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8 years ago  ::  Jul 16, 2009 - 11:25PM #5
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Conservative and Traditional Christians do not have a monopoly on "Fundamentalism"


The Left, since the French Revolution, has exhibited a doctrinaire bent in their  ideology. They will defend their "orthodoxy" as relentlessly, ruthlessly and rabidly as anyone one the right. It is not a pretty sight at all.

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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8 years ago  ::  Aug 03, 2009 - 4:22PM #6
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Aug 3, 2009 -- 2:09PM, jeanette1 wrote:


Roo...are you a Baptist? Or are you an Anglican...because I don't know you I must ask.





I am a ex-TECie, I left TEC for the Baptist Church 27 years ago. seeing that I am now a guest on your forum, I have to mind my manners.

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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8 years ago  ::  Aug 03, 2009 - 5:55PM #7
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Aug 3, 2009 -- 5:24PM, jeanette1 wrote:




 


lol!


I was just puzzled as to why you were bringing your Baptist beliefs to our forum..Anglican conservatives are usually not considered fundies..but then again I do know some very liberal thinking Baptists.


Anyway,just trying to figure things out. I was on a mental health break from Bnet but I'm back for a bit and want to know who is who and what is what.





I am conservative theologically but sociologially a moderate. Just go to the A&E forum and look at some of the threads on the issues that have come up. Lots of people are opposed to the Conservatives in your own Church. They are particularly vehement with the Third World  Conservatives. I think that it will open your eyes.

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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8 years ago  ::  Aug 03, 2009 - 6:35PM #8
kurnell
Posts: 309

I think the thing that identifies modern day christian fundamentalism is their view on Scripture.They hold to verbal inspiration and inerrancy.From there they tend to be selective in their use of Scripture, they have made an art of 'proof-texting'.


Their worldview tends to be very dualistic.Satan holds sway over this world till Jesus returns to set up His kingdom on earth.Because of this worldview, they hold the sciences with some suspicion.


They tend to have a very clear view of 'who's in' and 'who's out'.Usually the determining factors are more doctrinal than experience.Right belief is everything.


I think it is true to say that most conservative Anglicans do not fall into this group, with perhaps the exception of some African and Sydney Anglicans.


Pax


Jeffrey

Treasure your experience of God,however it comes to you.Remember that Christianity is not a notion but a way.
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8 years ago  ::  Aug 03, 2009 - 7:27PM #9
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Aug 3, 2009 -- 6:35PM, kurnell wrote:


I think the thing that identifies modern day christian fundamentalism is their view on Scripture.They hold to verbal inspiration and inerrancy.From there they tend to be selective in their use of Scripture, they have made an art of 'proof-texting'.


Their worldview tends to be very dualistic.Satan holds sway over this world till Jesus returns to set up His kingdom on earth.Because of this worldview, they hold the sciences with some suspicion.


They tend to have a very clear view of 'who's in' and 'who's out'.Usually the determining factors are more doctrinal than experience.Right belief is everything.


I think it is true to say that most conservative Anglicans do not fall into this group, with perhaps the exception of some African and Sydney Anglicans.


Pax


Jeffrey





I as a Baptist am not sure that is entirely true.

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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8 years ago  ::  Aug 03, 2009 - 10:34PM #10
kurnell
Posts: 309

Labels are always such slippery things! I think a conservative evangelical and a fundamentalist have much in common as to doctrinal belief.The difference is possibly that the fundamentalist is more 'apocalyptic' in mind set.Much of their thinking and living is in terms of being in the 'last days', times of apostasy, the 'remnant church', 'the rapture' etc.


As a consequence, thinking is very black and white, right and wrong.The world is against the true christian and true christian values.Therefore the concept of there being a war going on between light and darkness, brings out an aggressive dimension to their belief system.Thus fundamentalism has a militancy about it.


Pax


Jeffrey

Treasure your experience of God,however it comes to you.Remember that Christianity is not a notion but a way.
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