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Switch to Forum Live View Christ the Great High Priest
8 years ago  ::  Jun 24, 2009 - 6:58PM #1
Thomas A Quinas
Posts: 1,970

A friend of mine sent this to me earlier today and I found it to be rather tasteful.  Hope you enjoy.



 


Courtesy of:  Iconographer Marek Czarnecki of Seraphic Restorations in Meridian, Connecticut, to USCCB


 



Reading


A treatise on the Trinity by St Faustinus


 


Christ, king and priest forever


 


Our Saviour received a bodily anointing and so became a true king and a true priest. Both king and priest he was of his very self; a saviour could be nothing less. Hear in his own words how he himself became a king: I have been appointed king by God on Zion his holy mountain. Hear in the Father's words that he was a priest: You are a priest forever in the line of Melchizedek. Aaron was the first under the law to be made a priest by being anointed with chrism, yet the Father does not say, "in the line of Aaron," lest it be believed that the Saviour's priesthood could be passed on by inheritance, for at that time Aaron's priesthood was transmitted by lineal descent. But the Saviour's priesthood is not inherited because this priest lives on for ever. Therefore Scripture says: You are a priest forever in the line of Melchizedek.


  There is, therefore, a saviour in the flesh who is both a king and a priest, though his anointing was not physical but spiritual. Among the Israelites, those kings and priests who were actually anointed with oil were either kings or priests. No man could be both king and priest; he had to be one or the other. Only Christ was both king and priest; because he had come to fulfil the law, he alone possessed the twofold perfection of kingship and priesthood.


  Those who had been anointed with the oil of kingship or priesthood, although they received only one of these anointings, were called messiahs. Our Saviour, however, who is the Christ, was anointed by the Holy Spirit so that the passage in Scripture might be fulfilled: God, your God, has anointed you with the oil of gladness and raised you above your companions. The difference, then, between the one Christ and the many christs is in the anointing, since he was anointed with the oil of gladness, which signifies nothing other than the Holy Spirit.


  This we know to be true from the Saviour himself. When he took the book of Isaiah, he opened it and read: The Spirit of the Lord is upon me because he has anointed me. He then said that the prophecy was fulfilled in the hearing of those listening.


  Peter, the prince of the apostles, also taught that the chrism which made the Saviour a christ was the Holy Spirit; that is to say, the power of God. When in the Acts of the Apostles Peter spoke to that faithful and merciful man, the centurion, he said among other things: After the baptism which John preached, Jesus of Nazareth, whom God anointed with the Holy Spirit and with power, started out in Galilee and travelled about performing powerful miracles, and freeing all who were possessed by the devil.


  So you see that Peter too said that Jesus in his humanity was anointed with the Holy Spirit and with power. Thus Jesus in his humanity truly became the Christ. By the anointing of the Holy Spirit, he was made both king and priest for ever. Universallist, June 1009



About the Icon


Order a Poster of the Icon


Explanation of the icon of Christ the Great High Priest


Iconographer Marek Czarnecki of Seraphic Restorations in Meriden, Connecticut, has graciously given the USCCB the rights to use the icon of Christ the Great High Priest during the Year for Priests.  The artist allows anyone to use or reproduce the icon, as long as it is not for any commercial purpose, (i.e., it cannot be reprinted to be sold or resold, or reprinted on something that will be sold). If this is the intent, they need to contact the artist for permission to license the image, under written contract. 


This icon (egg tempera and gold leaf on wood panel, 28" x 22") is "based on a fifteenth century Greek prototype; here Christ is shown in Latin Rite vestments with a gold pelican over His heart, the ancient symbol of self-sacrifice. The borders contain a windig grapevine and altar prepared for the celebration of the liturgy of the Mass; in the borders are smaller icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney."  Incidentally, it is St. John Vianney whom Pope Benedict XVI, with the announcement of this special year, has declared the Universal Patron of Priests. 


Czarnecki explains: "I wrote the icon about seven years ago [for seminarians and priests] to be able to see Christ in themselves, and themselves in Christ.  We often hear that the icon is called a window; in this case, it's also meant to be a mirror."  The Good Shepherd reminds the priest that he is to "lay down his life for his sheep." (www.seraphicrestorations.com)


To order an 18" x 24" poster of this icon from the National Federation of Priests' Councils, click here.


 


PS Pray for your priests (and any future Catholic priests you may happen to knowWink)

Holiness consists simply in doing God's will, and being just what God wants us to be.. -- St. Therese of Lisieux. For applicable reads: Uniformity with God’s Will by Saint Alphonsus Liguori ... or ... Story of a Soul
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8 years ago  ::  Jun 25, 2009 - 9:09AM #2
malanga
Posts: 626

Thank you Thomas for posting this icon and the storyline behind it. Smile

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8 years ago  ::  Jun 26, 2009 - 2:37PM #3
Shaner
Posts: 1,596

Hello Thomas,


Welcome to the Forum btw!


Very beautiful Icon and one of the Scripture quotes that I really love.......Our Lord as the Good Shepherd and we, His sheep in His fold,



God bless, Sandy



 

"Lord, to whom shall we go?  You have the Words of Eternal Life"
"Philippians 4:13. "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
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8 years ago  ::  Jun 27, 2009 - 8:56PM #4
Mareczku
Posts: 2,220

This is very beautiful.  Glad that I finally came across the Ave Maria Cafe.


 


Peace - Mareczku 

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8 years ago  ::  Jun 28, 2009 - 11:57PM #5
jane2
Posts: 14,295

I find the icon bad theology--not a comment on iconagraphy, but what this one represents.


I simply don't believe Christ came to earth to be a High Priest: quite the opposite: He came to serve and lead us to the Father. I base much of my thinking on WHO IS JESUS by Thomas Rausch, S.J., PhD. and current T. Marie Chilton Professor of Catholic Theology at Loyola Marymount U. in Los Angeles.


It's a brillaint book by a brilliant theologian.It is a book on current thinking in Christology.


Have you read it? Do you read current Christology? This isn't it.

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8 years ago  ::  Jul 01, 2009 - 6:23AM #6
ladyalice
Posts: 266

This icon does not represent bad theology.  Nor does it go against current trends in Chrostology.


Jesus came to earth to serve and lead us to the Father (the Kingdom).  Is this not the the very essance of a priest; to serve and lead us to the Kingdom of God?


Current Christology explores the divine and human natures of Christ in a balanced way that is expressed in the terms "high Christology", or Christology from above, and "low Christology" or Christology  from below.  High Christology focuses on the divine nature of Christ: God who took the form of man.  Low Christology focuses on the human nature, Jesus, the man who was God.


According to the theologian who who developed this theology the two "Christologies" converge in the Incarnation; Jesus, both God and man.


The icon provides a perfect example of high and low Christology coming together.  Although Jesus did not fill the role of High Priest in the Temple of Israel, throughout His mission he set the example of what the New Covenant priest should be. His example remains, and He is looked upon as the High Priest in the Kingdom of Heaven from where He leads us and the ordained priesthood.


The book Jane referenced is focused on Christology from below; the human nature of Jesus; the historical Jesus.  Rausch makes the claim that the study of Christology should begin with low Christology, and so this is where places his emphaisis.  In this book, which he calls an Introduction is almost entirely devoted to Jesus, the man.  However, he does not ignore nor does he deny the divine nature of Christ.  


Current Christology expresses a varity of thought.  By no means can we declare "this is it" or this "isn't it" based on an example such as the icon presented.  Rausch cites some of the most influential theologians in modern theology.  He very nicely points out those with whom he is in agreement and with whom he disagrees.  He also nicely discusses how they disagree with each other. He discusses how he both agrees and disagrees with the same theologian on different points.  There is no difinative trend in current Christology.


 


Jane, you may want to reread this book.  Based on what you posted you have a rather narrow understanding of Christology.  Read the book slowly and use the authors references to gain other points of view.

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8 years ago  ::  Jul 01, 2009 - 5:45PM #7
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Jul 1, 2009 -- 6:23AM, ladyalice wrote:


This icon does not represent bad theology.  Nor does it go against current trends in Chrostology.


Jesus came to earth to serve and lead us to the Father (the Kingdom).  Is this not the the very essance of a priest; to serve and lead us to the Kingdom of God?


Current Christology explores the divine and human natures of Christ in a balanced way that is expressed in the terms "high Christology", or Christology from above, and "low Christology" or Christology  from below.  High Christology focuses on the divine nature of Christ: God who took the form of man.  Low Christology focuses on the human nature, Jesus, the man who was God.


According to the theologian who who developed this theology the two "Christologies" converge in the Incarnation; Jesus, both God and man.


The icon provides a perfect example of high and low Christology coming together.  Although Jesus did not fill the role of High Priest in the Temple of Israel, throughout His mission he set the example of what the New Covenant priest should be. His example remains, and He is looked upon as the High Priest in the Kingdom of Heaven from where He leads us and the ordained priesthood.


The book Jane referenced is focused on Christology from below; the human nature of Jesus; the historical Jesus.  Rausch makes the claim that the study of Christology should begin with low Christology, and so this is where places his emphaisis.  In this book, which he calls an Introduction is almost entirely devoted to Jesus, the man.  However, he does not ignore nor does he deny the divine nature of Christ.  


Current Christology expresses a varity of thought.  By no means can we declare "this is it" or this "isn't it" based on an example such as the icon presented.  Rausch cites some of the most influential theologians in modern theology.  He very nicely points out those with whom he is in agreement and with whom he disagrees.  He also nicely discusses how they disagree with each other. He discusses how he both agrees and disagrees with the same theologian on different points.  There is no difinative trend in current Christology.


 


Jane, you may want to reread this book.  Based on what you posted you have a rather narrow understanding of Christology.  Read the book slowly and use the authors references to gain other points of view.




Alice, give it a rest. I do know about high and low Christology.


Basically the icon of Christ in a modernn chausable is a non-starter for me. That is pretty much what I posted. Certainly all too many of our Catholic hierarchs today do not follow the servant model and many of the more-newly ordained priests do not either.


Part of what I like about Eliabeth Johnson's book TRULY OUR SISTER is the earthly history of whom Miriam of Nazareth was, too.


You have a penchant for showing up only in regard to my posts, here and on the Discuss Catholicim board. That makes me curious and that is not unwarranted.

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8 years ago  ::  Jul 02, 2009 - 6:31AM #8
ladyalice
Posts: 266

Jane, my post was not addressed to you.  It was posted for the benefit of the other readers of the thread who may or may not know about high and low Christology. 

That is not what you posted.  You said that the icon represented bad theology and did not reflect current Christology. ("This isn't it")  These statements are nonsense, whether you like the icon, or not.  I felt the need to correct them; especially since you issued such a strange challange to the OP concerning his familiarity with Christology.




If what you say about our priests and bishops is true, then this icon can serve as a beautiful reminder of what they are called to be.


Your post also implied a distorted impression of the book you referenced.  I wanted to speak to that as well.


I didn't post to you directly until the end when I suggested that you "reread" the book. 


As for showing up to give you a hard time--you must be kidding--I hardly post at all.

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8 years ago  ::  Jul 02, 2009 - 10:50AM #9
Shaner
Posts: 1,596


This Icon of Christ as the High Priest is aptly fitting right now, Pope Benedict XVI recently declared this "The year of the Priest"!


May God bless all of our Priests to continue in the role that Christ bestowed upon them.



God bless,


Sandy


 

"Lord, to whom shall we go?  You have the Words of Eternal Life"
"Philippians 4:13. "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
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