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Switch to Forum Live View I can no longer defend the Church's teachings on Contraception
9 years ago  ::  Mar 11, 2009 - 11:59PM #1
Kinky.christian
Posts: 262

I write this with a heavy heart because I have always considered myself a faithful and obedient Catholic.

I cannot defend the Church's position on birth control.

The so-called rhythm method is unreliable. Condoms are a safe and proven method of contraception. I cannot understand why their use is a sin. None of the reasons given make any sense to me.

My attitude has always been that the teachings of the Church reflect the wisdom of centuries; that where I find myself in disagreement with Magisterium it is almost certainly I who is wrong.

Even where I do not understand a teaching I have always believed it is my duty to be obey.

But when it comes to the Church's teaching on birth control I am afraid I find myself in rebellion against Church teaching.

On an overcrowded planet limiting the number of children a couple has seems a responsible thing to do. In fact I would argue that in the circumstances of 2009 having too many children is a sin.

For the record I am single and celibate. I have no axe to grind on this issue. But I have seen other women struggle with this issue and my heart goes out to them.

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9 years ago  ::  Mar 12, 2009 - 12:59AM #2
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Mar 11, 2009 -- 11:59PM, Kinky.christian wrote:


I write this with a heavy heart because I have always considered myself a faithful and obedient Catholic.

I cannot defend the Church's position on birth control.

The so-called rhythm method is unreliable. Condoms are a safe and proven method of contraception. I cannot understand why their use is a sin. None of the reasons given make any sense to me.

My attitude has always been that the teachings of the Church reflect the wisdom of centuries; that where I find myself in disagreement with Magisterium it is almost certainly I who is wrong.

Even where I do not understand a teaching I have always believed it is my duty to be obey.

But when it comes to the Church's teaching on birth control I am afraid I find myself in rebellion against Church teaching.

On an overcrowded planet limiting the number of children a couple has seems a responsible thing to do. In fact I would argue that in the circumstances of 2009 having too many children is a sin.

For the record I am single and celibate. I have no axe to grind on this issue. But I have seen other women struggle with this issue and my heart goes out to them.




According to many polls 85% of American Catholics do not accept this teaching and many remain Catholic.


The publication of Humanae Vitae was one of the great turning points in American Catholicism. I was almost totally rejected for many reasons. The greatrest reason was that in the end Paul VI rejected the advice of the commisions on the subject he commisssioned.


We need ot know and read Church history, which is seldom taught. The RCC also has a problem with adult education and those who can teach it responsibly. At my daughter's wddding in a Methodist Church, many of the guests of her in-laws were almost life-long members of their Methodist Sunday School class. Methodism is much newer and has less bad baggage than Catholicism. Even with a bit a bit of adult education, which is so sorely lacking, in today's RCC few would let real Church history be taught.


I learned Church history studying European history in a Catholic college: in that college no apologies were made for some very bad Church history. But I was educated in a very different era of intellectual Catholicism--we were taught to question,  by women religious and priests.


 

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9 years ago  ::  Mar 12, 2009 - 1:39AM #3
Kinky.christian
Posts: 262


Hi Jane2

I find no comfort in being in the majority. I truly wish I could find some way of reconciling my conscience with Church teachings on artificial birth control. But despite literally days of prayer I cannot.

I agree that we have a problem with adult education in the Church. Actually that understates it. I think we have a problem with education, period. How many Catholics don't even know the Catechism?

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9 years ago  ::  Mar 12, 2009 - 7:35AM #4
Tmarie64
Posts: 5,277

It's damn hard being smart, free thinking, AND Catholic... ain't it?


KC, I disagree with some of the doctrines... But, much as I disagree with, it's still the best church in town for me.


Disagreement does not mean you have to dump it.  It just means you have to reconcile yourself with the fact that God made you intelligent.   I used to defend the church.  I used to feel that maybe b.c. wasn't really "right".  But then the pedophiles were exposed, and the fact that they were not only hidden, but also transferred from parish to parish or promoted... and that made me realize that the church is run by MEN.  Men who aren't any smarter than I, and some are far less moral than the average alley cat.   MEN created the doctirnes.  If the pope had to be pregnant, I GUARANTEE that b.c. would not only be acceptable, it would be MANDATORY.


I think this is part of the reason they don't let women into real power positions in the church. The men would be forced to see women as something other than incubators.

James Thurber - "It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers."
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9 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2009 - 10:10AM #5
Kinky.christian
Posts: 262



Hi Tmarie64,

I would never "dump" the Church. I do not have the words to express my love for the Catholic Church.

But that's precisely what makes it so hard for me to find myself in such strong disagreement with the Magisterium. Try as I might I simply cannot agree with the Church's teachings on artificial birth control and that saddens me almost more than I can bear.


 


 

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9 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2009 - 11:24AM #6
Jazel
Posts: 1,182

Mar 13, 2009 -- 10:10AM, Kinky.christian wrote:




Hi Tmarie64,

I would never "dump" the Church. I do not have the words to express my love for the Catholic Church.

But that's precisely what makes it so hard for me to find myself in such strong disagreement with the Magisterium. Try as I might I simply cannot agree with the Church's teachings on artificial birth control and that saddens me almost more than I can bear.


 


 




I understand your sadness to a T.  In my early 20's I did leave the Church over this and other issues.  I never stopped believing, but I could not reconcile my feelings.  Now, "feelings" do change as we grow, and it's always dangerous to be ruled by "feelings".  But.  Some feelings are a personal, God-given Truth, IMO.  I am 40 now, and a step away from re-entering the Church.  I'm still reconciling everything, but I don't feel that sadness anymore.  God didn't make me to slavishly follow Man or even His Church.  God made to follow Him, the best I am able.


Disagreement can cause Doubt.  But Doubt can increase Faith tenfold.


-Jim

Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. And inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. - Marx
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9 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2009 - 11:32AM #7
Tmarie64
Posts: 5,277

Doubt can, indeed, increase faith.  I know my doubt of the leaders has increased my faith that there is a better way coming.    More and more people are looking around and saying, "Hey!  You can't get away with that."


I think that little girl in Brazil is one catalyst that may start change.

James Thurber - "It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers."
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9 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2009 - 11:27PM #8
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Mar 13, 2009 -- 11:32AM, Tmarie64 wrote:


Doubt can, indeed, increase faith.  I know my doubt of the leaders has increased my faith that there is a better way coming.    More and more people are looking around and saying, "Hey!  You can't get away with that."


I think that little girl in Brazil is one catalyst that may start change.




I don't think the case in Brazil will change anything. The Church should have stayed out of it and so should the press: a bad combination.


Benedict had a shocked reatcion to the public backlash in the matter of un-excommunicating the SSPX bishops, especially Willaimson on his denial of the holocaust, by the bishops of the world. I wish it would change how he does business, but it probably won't.


What many who are looking around and saying you can't do that is leaving the Church.  What both Benedict and John Paul II did/do is look to some old European monarchical church long gone.


John Paul II appointed only American bishops loyal to this thinking: they are a craven lot overall. He intended and acheived an American Church that would not function as it could and should. He feared American theological thought and put it where he wanted it: always under the gun. I may well buy the new book by Charles Curran, S.J.--Rome depises him. One of my requests for Xmas was the new book on theology by Father McBrien, chair professor of theology at Notre Dame--a gem. Rome doesn't favor him either, too independent American.


 

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9 years ago  ::  Mar 14, 2009 - 12:04PM #9
charbs
Posts: 2

When I got married, my priest counseled us to use our conscience on the matter of birth control, which we did.


Now we have a couple of younger, more strident conservative priests in the parish, and one of them likes to go on and on about the "Culture of Death" in America concerning abortion, but then in their sermons, and in prayer intentions, they throw birth control and sterilization in with abortion, as co-evils.  I'm not buying that, and it makes me question about just how awful abortion is because of it.


We had a prayer for special intentions  for "those who have suffered from contraceptiopn and sterilization" and I'm sitting there thinking "I bet there's more people in this church right now  who have suffered from a LACK of contraception than because of it.  Not too many eight or nine kid families in our church anymore.


 


 

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9 years ago  ::  Mar 14, 2009 - 9:20PM #10
Jazel
Posts: 1,182

This whole conversation just brings me back to when I was 20 and left the Church.  My opinions don't seem to have changed as I've gotten older.


The Church seems to view women as "baby machines" and nothing more.  Keep 'em out of commission for nine months out of the year and they can't cause no trouble.  What.  The.  Hell?


Meanwhile, the boys are being taught sex education (by a celibate man) that amounts to, basically, "don't let the whores get ya!"


I don't think people should have sex willy-nilly, but not because I think God frowns on it - but because it causes societal problems.  I especially don't think teenagers should be having sex, because they have no idea what they're doing.  Do my opinions on sex stop anybody from anybody from having sex?  Of course not.  And that's why there is contraception.


-Jim

Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. And inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. - Marx
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