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Switch to Forum Live View Methodist&catholic Common Faith?
6 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2007 - 12:31PM #1
friendofsaints&angels
Posts: 1,327
I am catholic and not to long ago I was listening to a catholic radio station called relevant radio, and I heard a guest on the show that I was listening to state that catholics and methodists have alot in common. He also stated that the methodist faith was closest to catholicism than any other faith. I know quite alot about my own faith, but don't know much about anyone elses. I plead ignorrance on this matter and that is the main reason I came to this website. I'm not trying to convert anybody and I think if someone finds GOD in any faith that is a good thing. I love GOD over my faith and I try to have a respect for everybody elses faiths. I may not always agree with things in other peoples faiths, but I respect them, and I love them for loving GOD.
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 27, 2007 - 10:12AM #2
TemplarS
Posts: 6,235
Well, I'm Catholic, not Methodist, but what you heard is to a large degree true.

Methodists (along with Anglican/Episcopals and Lutherans), like Catholics, have a centralized Church structure, retaining Bishops.  Methodists are Sacramental, though they recognize only 2 Sacraments (Communion and Baptism) unlike the Catholic 7.  Both Methodists and Catholics recognize infant baptism.  The Methodist view of salvation (called Arminianism) is close to what Catholics believe.  Methodists, like Catholics, explicitly recognize tradtion as a basis for faith in additon to scripture, and do not insist that all scripture be interpreted literally.  Methodists are Protestant, but in all of the above they are actually closer to Catholics in belief than they are to nonsacramental Protestants such as Baptists and other Evangelicals.

There are of course some differences.  Methodists do not recognize the Papacy, and the Church is run more democratically.  They do not in general pray to or venerate Mary and saints (though some individual Methodists might).  Methodists have female and married clergy. Though some Methodist churches have formal liturgies similar to Catholics, many others have a more free-form worship; not all Methodist churches have weekly Communion, and they practice open Communion.
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6 years ago  ::  Dec 03, 2007 - 10:45AM #3
joyinhim
Posts: 29
I am a Methodist... a United Methodist ...

I know that there are things in my church that I don't agree with, but the majority, I do.

We believe that you must me born again... Accept Christ as your personal Savior...

We believe in the Bible as the Holy word of God.

We have 2 Sacraments.  Baptisim and Communion.  Our communion is inclusive... anyone with the heart and need, is invited. 

We do not believe in confessing to a Priest, our confession is done personally to Christ, we do not believe that we need an intermediary. We pray only to our Lord, not to Mary or saints etc.

We do not believe in the Papacy... We do have Bishops, etc... but that is as far as we go.

Our doors are open to anyone seeking Him.... we love the sinner, but we do hate the sin. 

We have many Missions, and help all we can, who we can...

I was raised without a church for many years, and my next door neighbors were Catholic.  I knew the Hail Mary before I new the 23 Psalm.... I find your religion beautiful in many ways, your genuflecting before you go into your pews... blessing yourself with the sign of the cross, all of those are beautiful.  Your pomp and ceremony is also beautiful.

Our differences lie in the method... and I know that the Catholic Church  has changed since I went as a child.  My only hope is that we can all get along... and know that Jesus is Lord over all.  That is the most important thing to know.  To follow Him, we can't go wrong.
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6 years ago  ::  Dec 18, 2007 - 8:41PM #4
NurseSusan
Posts: 1
I joined the UMC several years ago, after marrying a UMC pastor (it was my idea to join :) , although he did like telling folks that his wife was Catholic). I was amazed at how similiar things were. The communion litergy is the same as it is in the Catholic church, however it is "Christ's table" for all who believe, not a "Catholic only" .
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2008 - 4:58PM #5
friendofsaints&angels
Posts: 1,327
Hey NurseSusan, that is something that kinda bums me out about the catholic church. I believe that Holy Communion should be open to anyone who acknowledges Jesus, but I'm only one person. with that being said, I also don't think anyone who is in a state of mortal sin should receive Communion. unfortunately, I think this is happening way to frequently in catholic churches. I see very long lines for Communion, and very short lines for Confession if you know what I mean.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 18, 2008 - 11:50AM #6
TemplarS
Posts: 6,235
There is a lot of bad history between Catholics and Protestants on the subject of Communion; but a lot of that doesn't amount to much more than reformation-era polemics which somehow crystaliized into doctrine. I think that these days Catholics and sacramental Protestants (Methodists, Anglicans, Lutherans) have much common ground if we would focus on it instead of magnifying differences.

On the Catholic side, personally I have no problem with sharing Communion with Protestants who have similar beliefs. By this I mean recognizing the real presence of Jesus in the Sacrament (and not quibbling about what things like transubstantiation mean); and approaching the sacrament with an attitude of true repentence (this is where sacramental confession comes in for Catholics).

On the part of these Protestants, perhaps there could be a bit more commitment to Communion as an integral part of worship. In Catholic chuches Communion is at least weekly and in many cases daily. And I believe Wesley himself authored a sermon on the importance of frequent Communion.  This was the practice since the early days of the Church, I don't know why Protestants got away from this.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2008 - 4:58PM #7
friendofsaints&angels
Posts: 1,327
Hey NurseSusan, that is something that kinda bums me out about the catholic church. I believe that Holy Communion should be open to anyone who acknowledges Jesus, but I'm only one person. with that being said, I also don't think anyone who is in a state of mortal sin should receive Communion. unfortunately, I think this is happening way to frequently in catholic churches. I see very long lines for Communion, and very short lines for Confession if you know what I mean.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 18, 2008 - 11:50AM #8
TemplarS
Posts: 6,235
There is a lot of bad history between Catholics and Protestants on the subject of Communion; but a lot of that doesn't amount to much more than reformation-era polemics which somehow crystaliized into doctrine. I think that these days Catholics and sacramental Protestants (Methodists, Anglicans, Lutherans) have much common ground if we would focus on it instead of magnifying differences.

On the Catholic side, personally I have no problem with sharing Communion with Protestants who have similar beliefs. By this I mean recognizing the real presence of Jesus in the Sacrament (and not quibbling about what things like transubstantiation mean); and approaching the sacrament with an attitude of true repentence (this is where sacramental confession comes in for Catholics).

On the part of these Protestants, perhaps there could be a bit more commitment to Communion as an integral part of worship. In Catholic chuches Communion is at least weekly and in many cases daily. And I believe Wesley himself authored a sermon on the importance of frequent Communion.  This was the practice since the early days of the Church, I don't know why Protestants got away from this.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 25, 2008 - 11:51PM #9
spudette
Posts: 959
I don't think it is very smart to take part in something you don't understand as completely as possible. What's wrong with knowing what "transubstantiation" means? I know what it means, and I know what "consubstantiation" means also.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 26, 2008 - 1:32PM #10
TemplarS
Posts: 6,235

spudette wrote:

I don't think it is very smart to take part in something you don't understand as completely as possible. What's wrong with knowing what "transubstantiation" means? I know what it means, and I know what "consubstantiation" means also.


I know what the difference in the definitions are as well. But what I do not understand is what this really means.


It amounts to this: in the one case, the "substance" of the bread is no longer there after consecration, and in the other, it remains. So what exactly is this "substance" of the bread? Not its physical composition, atoms or molecules (since, for one thing, even to those who accept transubstantiation it is evident that people can have physical reactions to alcohol and gluten in the elements). So what then? In other words, what exactly of the bread or wine is not there afterwards?

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