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6 years ago  ::  Jun 12, 2008 - 12:06PM #1
justins_mommie33
Posts: 2
I was born and raised as a daughter of a UCC minister.  I of course was baptized and church was always an important part of my life.  After meeting my husband I drifted from the church.  Now that I am a mom and in the midst of a divorce I am finding comfort at church.  I want to have my son baptized.  I am unsure how to approach his father my future ex about it.  He wants more than "I just feel it is important".   I want Justin to know about spitituality and he enjoys attending.  I plan to join again in the next few months. Any suggestions.
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2008 - 12:06AM #2
JonAtFaithUCC
Posts: 294
Hi there!  How old is your son?
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2008 - 8:10AM #3
justins_mommie33
Posts: 2
He is 7 years old.  The few times he has attended with me he has LOVED it.
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2008 - 10:19AM #4
mecdukebec
Posts: 14,451
As a UCC pastor, I would say that 7 is closer than ``not`` to confirmation age.  If your church has a confirmation (catechism) class, why not have your child in confirmation when a teenager, then baptism.  It`s not `required` but if you and your son are `getting into` church, there`s the wonderful process of welcoming into the church that could come for him and you by church camp, confirmation camp, then an outrageously, wonderful baptism and confirmation ceremony that could take place in a service of worship.   It would be an incredible high-point for your entire family. 

But, if your son and you desire baptism now, that`s no problem either.  Why not call the pastor, and discuss what you both want to do.  If your church already welcomes your son into Holy Communion, as our UCC congregation does, baptism is another step along that journey into ``church`` (in all its great meanings). :)
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"Wesley told the early Methodists to gain all they could and save all they could so that they could give all they could. It means that I consider my money to belong to God and I see myself as one of the hungry people who needs to get fed with God’s money. If I really have put all my trust in Jesus Christ as savior and Lord, then nothing I have is really my own anymore."
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2008 - 10:43PM #5
JonAtFaithUCC
Posts: 294
I agree that it might be simpler to wait until confirmation time to have your son complete baptism.  Then it's his decision as opposed to yours, which might change the nature of your discussion over baptism with your soon-to-be ex-husband.
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 19, 2008 - 12:43AM #6
DonTheNorski
Posts: 193
I'm curious as to how the UCC views Baptism.  I'm an ELCA Lutheran, and we're in full communion with your church.  Contrary to what the Fundagelicals tend to think, Lutherans don't buy into the decision based theology of much of the Protestant camp.  Rather, we believe that God is the Actor in Baptism, it is His promises that adopt us as His own into the Church. We consider Baptism as one of the two sacraments (the other being Holy Communion).

From a Lutheran perspective, I'd say ask your kid!  You don't have to "understand" what's going on in order for God to do His work in you! At this point, you, as his parent, are still responsible for seeing that he is taught the creed, the Lord's prayer, the 10 commandments, etc, so that he is brought up in the Word. (again, Lute perspective, YYMV)
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6 years ago  ::  Jul 19, 2008 - 5:58PM #7
DonTheNorski
Posts: 193
After looking at this a couple months later, I think I could clarify a bit.

Baptism is a "means of grace", as is the other sacrament, Holy Communion.  As such, there is a very therapeutic nature to it, a blessing unto the person receiving the sacrament.  In baptism, that blessing is the adoption into God's family, the church, the Body of Christ. It is where God promises to make us one of His children.

Why prevent a young child from receiving that grace, or why postpone an older child's receiving that grace?  Remember, God is the Actor in baptism.
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5 years ago  ::  May 06, 2009 - 10:00PM #8
Corgi
Posts: 61

The Reformed tradition, of which the UCC is a part, has always taught that baptism is a sign of grace, not a means of grace.  The only means of grace is the free will of God, and baptism is one way we are made aware of that grace.  Because God grants grace regardless of age, or other qualifiers.  Me, I'd encourage the baptism of a 7 year old.  In baptism, we include the child in the community of the faith, and are reminded of God's unconditional grace. 

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