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6 years ago  ::  May 22, 2008 - 1:39PM #21
malanga
Posts: 626
[QUOTE=dutch777;516787]For those with an interest in the range of meaning and divergent applications of the term catholic, the following link is provided:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catholic

Personally, I'm more interested the the price of turnips.
:)[/QUOTE]

I thought it was pig's feet that was your weakness...
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2012 - 8:31AM #22
RJMcElwain
Posts: 2,961

Mar 3, 2012 -- 7:53AM, Nino0814 wrote:


May 17, 2008 -- 4:48PM, rbchaddy2000 wrote:

I went the path of another former Anglo-Catholic, Richard Holloway. Unlike Spong, Holloway has original thoughts, and is quite literary. A good start for Holloway is "Doubts and Loves". Richard



Here is a very interesting interview with Christian thinkers Richard Holloway and Karin Armstrong, and Jewish thinker, Safran Foer, reflecting on Faith, Belief and Religious Ritual.


www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01cjm4c/S...




An interesting interview with two of my favorite people, Armstrong and Holloway. However, I'll have to go back to it later as it's fairly long.


Thanks.

Robert J. McElwain

"The strongest reason for people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." (Supposedly)Thomas Jefferson

"He who is not angry when there is just cause for anger is immoral."
St. Thomas Aquinas

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors. Plato
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2012 - 10:32AM #23
Dutch777
Posts: 9,122

Bob,


Excellent discussion; I've passed it along.


Bp. Holloway and K.Armstrong are also two of my favorites.  I'm currently reading Armstrongs' A History of God.


Need I mention that I'm in broad agreement with the points made during the discussion?

The Path
To Moon Lake
Doesn't Go
There.

So Walk
Your own Dharma*Path
And Be
Mindful

Dutch
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2012 - 11:44AM #24
RJMcElwain
Posts: 2,961

Mar 3, 2012 -- 10:32AM, Dutch777 wrote:


Bob,


Excellent discussion; I've passed it along.


Bp. Holloway and K.Armstrong are also two of my favorites.  I'm currently reading Armstrongs' A History of God.


Need I mention that I'm in broad agreement with the points made during the discussion?




Several years ago, when I was responsible for bringing a Jesus Seminar Road Show to Kansas City, I had the good fortune of having Bishop Holloway and Robert Funk on the same stage. Afterward, I was able to take the two of them to dinner. Talk about heady conversation. Of course, I mostly just listened to the two of them and drooled like an idiot.Foot in Mouth

Robert J. McElwain

"The strongest reason for people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." (Supposedly)Thomas Jefferson

"He who is not angry when there is just cause for anger is immoral."
St. Thomas Aquinas

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors. Plato
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2012 - 4:10PM #25
RJMcElwain
Posts: 2,961

Mar 3, 2012 -- 12:37PM, Nino0814 wrote:


Mar 3, 2012 -- 11:44AM, RJMcElwain wrote:


Several years ago, when I was responsible for bringing a Jesus Seminar Road Show to Kansas City, I had the good fortune of having Bishop Holloway and Robert Funk on the same stage. Afterward, I was able to take the two of them to dinner. Talk about heady conversation. Of course, I mostly just listened to the two of them and drooled like an idiot.



Awesome Bob!  Sounds like a great party to this geek!! 





Nino,


It was. My wife and I did the Jesus Seminar Road Show in KC about 4 or 5 times, and we had the opportunity to hang with some brilliant minds.


Of course, anyone can do the same thing by attending the Jesus Seminar semi-annual Conferences on the left coast. We've done some of those as well, and it's been long enough that we both feel the need to do it again.

Robert J. McElwain

"The strongest reason for people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." (Supposedly)Thomas Jefferson

"He who is not angry when there is just cause for anger is immoral."
St. Thomas Aquinas

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors. Plato
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2012 - 4:18PM #26
Rhartsc
Posts: 10

Hi everyone! I am here as an inquirer. I must admit that I am thoroughly confused by Anglicanism. I was one website for an TEC parish and it was saying that Anglicans were catholic and not protestant and believe in the real presence etc. and I liked that because I consider myself a Catholic but then I stumbled upon another article by a different member of the TEC that said the exact opposite: that it is the "Protestant Episcopal Church" and that they did not believe in popish beliefs like the real presence. 


Anyone else confused? While I may have criticisms of the Roman Catholic Church of which I was a member for 24 years or the Orthodox Church which I am currently a member I have to say that they at least had a strong set of core beliefs. Does Anglicanism have this or is it all willy nilly believe what you want?

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2012 - 4:34PM #27
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,370

this is a 4 year old thread...

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.
Eleanor Roosevelt
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2012 - 5:32PM #28
Rhartsc
Posts: 10

I'm sorry I am not really well versed in forum ettiquete. I thought since it was the same subject that I wanted toask about that it was the appropriate place to place my comment. To tell you the truth I missed the time stamps on the other posts. Next time I will create a new topic.

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2012 - 6:45PM #29
Dutch777
Posts: 9,122

Rhartsc,


If you ask specific questions you'll receive specific answers.


Welcome to the Anglican site.

The Path
To Moon Lake
Doesn't Go
There.

So Walk
Your own Dharma*Path
And Be
Mindful

Dutch
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2012 - 9:13PM #30
Rhartsc
Posts: 10

Apr 20, 2012 -- 7:52PM, Nino0814 wrote:


Apr 20, 2012 -- 4:18PM, Rhartsc wrote:


Hi everyone! I am here as an inquirer. I must admit that I am thoroughly confused by Anglicanism. I was one website for an TEC parish and it was saying that Anglicans were catholic and not protestant and believe in the real presence etc. and I liked that because I consider myself a Catholic but then I stumbled upon another article by a different member of the TEC that said the exact opposite: that it is the "Protestant Episcopal Church" and that they did not believe in popish beliefs like the real presence. 


Anyone else confused? While I may have criticisms of the Roman Catholic Church of which I was a member for 24 years or the Orthodox Church which I am currently a member I have to say that they at least had a strong set of core beliefs. Does Anglicanism have this or is it all willy nilly believe what you want?




Welcome Rhartsc to the Forum!  We love to discuss Anglicanism and welcome your questions!


The Church in the USA was once called The Protestant Episcopal Church to differentiate itself from Roman Catholicism, but IMO Anglicanism is not Protestant.  Some of the historic views of the Episcopal church reflected protestant doctrines, and protestant reactions against some Roman Catholic views and practices, [veneration of the Eucharist or belief in purgatory] the same could be true one day of the RCC itself.  This would not make the RCC protestant.  IMO a protestant church is one that is founded on a particular protestant confession.  


Anglicanism did adopt the Articles of Religion [in various forms in the national churches] but the churches were not founded upon the Articles of Religion.  Anglian churches are churches whose apostolic roots are trace through the Church founded in England, which existed before there was a Protestant Reformation.  Therefore Anglicanism IMO is not Protestant.







Thanks for you response. I never thought of The Anglican Communion as Protestant but I never had first hand experience. I know my maternal Grandfather was Anglican and was from England. Is there any introductory books that would give me a better idea of what it means to be an Anglican. I know for the Orthodox Church there is the book of the same name by Timothy Ware which makes it very accessable to people with no previous experience. Is there something like that available?

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