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10 years ago  ::  Mar 31, 2008 - 8:02PM #1
BrotherWitch
Posts: 25
My wife and daughter have begun attending church again at a local parish. I am a neo-pagan (wiccan) but would like to go with them to encourage them on their path. 

I will not receive communion and have not told the parish priest what I believe -- I don't wish to be deceptive, but I also do not want to create problems for them. I believe it would be good for us to go together on Sunday mornings.

My wife needs to broaden her pool of potential friends -- her closest woman friend died a couple of years ago, and I think she has missed her terribly. Also, my daughter goes to an Assemblies of God school and needs exposure to a broader Christianity than she now has.

Thoughts?

Thanks,
Tom
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10 years ago  ::  Mar 31, 2008 - 8:50PM #2
artemis01
Posts: 925

BrotherWitch wrote:

My wife and daughter have begun attending church again at a local parish. I am a neo-pagan (wiccan) but would like to go with them to encourage them on their path. 

I will not receive communion and have not told the parish priest what I believe -- I don't wish to be deceptive, but I also do not want to create problems for them. I believe it would be good for us to go together on Sunday mornings.

My wife needs to broaden her pool of potential friends -- her closest woman friend died a couple of years ago, and I think she has missed her terribly. Also, my daughter goes to an Assemblies of God school and needs exposure to a broader Christianity than she now has.

Thoughts?

Thanks,
Tom



Of course you're welcome.  It's fine not to receive Communion; I didn't for about 2 years, even though I was eligible to since I was baptized as a child.  I just sat in my seat when everybody went up; nobody ever bothered me about it.

Nobody will grill you about what you believe, either; in fact, I think it's pretty nice of you to go along with your family even though you don't believe.

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10 years ago  ::  Apr 01, 2008 - 5:26PM #3
Dutch777
Posts: 9,144
Bro.Witch:

You are welcomed at your local TEC congregation; no-one will subject you to cross-examination, proseltyzing, or any form of personal boundary violation.  Who knows --- you might actually dig the music.

TECies don't engage in flickr.com/photos/un_owen/910885934/ .  We consider that sort of thing bad taste.    BTW, you might find a kindred spirit in the Celtic Spirituality aspect of Anglicanism.
:)
The Path
To Moon
lake
Doesn't Go
There.

So Walk
Your own
DharmaPath
And Be
Mindful

Dutch
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 01, 2008 - 5:37PM #4
hortonthrockmorton
Posts: 3,497
The priest probably mentioned this, but just because you don't partake of Communion doesn't mean you can't go up to the altar with your family and receive a blessing, if you want.
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 01, 2008 - 7:08PM #5
BrotherWitch
Posts: 25
Thank you, that is encouraging.

This parish is in a diocese where most of the churches have voted to follow their bishop out of the Episcopal Church and into an affiliation with a more traditional South American Province...Southern Cone, I think it's called.

The parish was split by the vote on whether to leave or stick to its Episcopal affiliation, although it is still Anglican, and people seem to be quite friendly. The priest is a good speaker and has been there for nearly 20 years. I don't get the impression that they're terribly fundamentalist.

There is another church that opted to remain Episcopal but it's in another community and is not as close to our home -- 10 minutes vs. 40 minutes.

Is there a good Web site where I can find out more about Celtic Christianity and its Anglican connection? I've heard a little about that and it sounds interesting to me.
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 01, 2008 - 7:10PM #6
BrotherWitch
Posts: 25
Nice photo!!!
flickr.com/photos/un_owen/910885934/
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 01, 2008 - 7:38PM #7
Dutch777
Posts: 9,144
Bro.Witch:

Celtic Christianity emphasizes the goodness of the Creation; that God's presence is immediate and unmediated; that God's presence suffuses all Creation.  It is, in effect, a type of antithesis to Calvinism.  Personally, I fellowship with God outside Church as much as inside during formal worship.  Nature, the Creation, is for me The Primal Sacrament, instituted by Providence to be a source of Being, Sustenance, and Grace for all Humankind.  Women held equal positions with men as Abbesses and Prophetesses (Celtic Christianity was monastery based)  albeit an anti-establishmentarian ethos permeated Celtic Christianity.  Much more appertains, but you can delve into the deeper waters yourself. 


celticpilgrimage.org/spirituality.htm

seekhere.org/columba.html

trinitysj.org/sermons/sermons_celtic.html
The Path
To Moon
lake
Doesn't Go
There.

So Walk
Your own
DharmaPath
And Be
Mindful

Dutch
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 02, 2008 - 4:19PM #8
pmcleanja
Posts: 1
[QUOTE=BrotherWitch;400880]This parish is in a diocese where most of the churches have voted to follow their bishop out of the Episcopal Church and into an affiliation with a more traditional South American Province ...... There is another church that opted to remain Episcopal but it's in another community and is not as close to our home -- 10 minutes vs. 40 minutes. [/QUOTE]

Honestly, I would strongly recommend that you consider spending the extra 30 minutes driving. A parish doesn't flaunt its prejudices and rigidity in front of newcomers. But joining a church is like getting married: it's best intended as a lifelong relationship, it hurts when it ends and leaves scars, and it makes forming the next relationship that much harder. And after a few years of listening to how evil it is to cater to "the Gay Agenda" and of praying that God will "defend Family Values from encroaching Liberalism" and of avoiding disclosing your own religion to people who don't know the difference between Wicca and Satanism, you're likely to find that the relationship starts to rub just a bit.

Of course, those things happen everywhere, but it helps if they're not policy.
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 03, 2008 - 11:33PM #9
BrotherWitch
Posts: 25
Right, I understand what you're saying. I suspect that even in the remaining Episcopal churches in the area, I might drive far to find one that was really liberal -- we live in California's central valley, which is generally pretty conservative.

I guess we're taking a wait-and-see attitude; as a Wiccan, I'm used to being around people who don't think the way I do, and it's a challenge sometimes. Perhaps I can be a quiet voice for tolerance in less-than-perfect circumstances.
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2008 - 12:48AM #10
witchcat
Posts: 2
Brotherwitch, my California geography is rusty. What you've said leads me to think that you might be in the Diocese of SanJoaquin. The diocese of San Joaquin has undergone tremendous upheaval in the last months with its bishop leading a large contingent to the Southern Cone. All because our general convention elected a supremely qualified woman to lead the Episcopal Church.  I think he might also have been unhappy that the PB supports the decision of the people and clergy of the Diocese of New Hampshire to elect a monagamous gay man as their bishop. (Just in case it's not obvious, I support both elections.)

You might be wise to ascertain the name of the Primate these various parishes follow. Parishes who give a woman's name are likely to feel more stable and be more stable financially.

We Episcopalians used to describe our various parishes as high, middle and low, back when we employed the Prayer Book published in 1928. In 1979, we adopted a more flexible prayerbook and began to allow woman to serve in all capacities..  A number of parishes left so that they could continue to use the 1928 book.  We still thought of ourselves as H,M,L  (incense and sung services, no incense and some sung services and not even using vestments (Those are the robes that clergy and lay assistants wear.)  And then we, as a group, began to practice patience, tolerance and caring, 

You've found us during the fall-out and readjustment period.

I hope this helps.  You're clearly a kind and caring person.  Bless you.

witchcat
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