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Switch to Forum Live View How to tell my parents!
10 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2008 - 2:19PM #1
bvarnell
Posts: 628
Hi,
I'm 14 and have been rised as a Southern Baptist, well through a short 'trist' if you will with catholicism and a Greek festival in my city, i became interested in Eastern Orthodoxy, and well i want to convert.  My dad has read some about Orthodoxy and has less opposition to it than say Roman Catholicism, but i dont think they would 'love' the idea of my becoming Orthodox.
With that said,
"How should i tell the i want to be Orthodox?"

Thanks!
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10 years ago  ::  Mar 11, 2008 - 11:35AM #2
anyuta64
Posts: 1,536
here is how I would answer your question.

you have apparently already told them of your general interest in Orthodoxy.  that is good.  I suggest you do as much research as you can, and share it (a little at a time) with your parents.  they may have questions/misconceptions, and you should be prepared to answer them.  don't expect them to embrace the idea right away.

you are only 14.  To your parents that may seem to be too young to be making a major decision like this.  The best thing you can do is to reasure them that you are not just doing it on the spur of the moment, that you have done the research, that you have given this mature and thorough thoughts etc.  Also, they may react more to the idea that you are rejecting their ideals, values and what they raised you with, perhaps just for the sake of rebellion (which is common at your age).  Try to reasure them that this is not the case.. not by SAYING so (although that too), but by showing that you still respect their beliefs and values, and that while you may be intersted in moving forward in a different direction, you value what they gave you as a starting point.. that you came to know Jesus because of them, and that by moving one you are not so much moving away from their beliefs as simply expanding upon them.  for a while, at least, continue to attend their church, to show them that while you are looking into something else, you haven't rejected what they know and raised you with.

Finally, I suggest that you not make any major decision on your own (against your parents wishes) at this time.  THis will only convince them that you are rejecting their faith.  Instead, continue to go to their church, wosrhip with them, pray with them.. while at the same time continuing to research Orthodoxy.. and learn as much as you can.

I'm not a convert, but I do have a daughter who, at about your age, thought she might want to try something different from the religion she was raised in.  I tried to respect her wishes while at the same time questioning (gently) her motives and whether she really understsood not jut what she was looking at changi8ng to, but also waht the REAL beliefs of our church are.. she had some misconceptions about what we actually believe, based on some steriotypes etc.  I didn't force her to do antyhing she didn't feel comfortable with, except to attend services with the family because she was part of the family.. and be respectful duribng the service.  she didn't have to to pray. she di8dn't have to sing. she didn't have to take communion.. she just had to be there with us. 
She eventually decided not to convert.  But if, by the time she was 18, she had shown me that she serously believed differnetly, that she had learned all she could about both religions, and honestly felt the other was more "True", then I'd have supported her changed.  but not at 14.

I suggest you stick with it, of course, since I htink Orthocoxy is the fullness of the truth. but remember, other faiths have parts of the Truth, and your parents will feel much better if you show them that you still recognise the Turth that is in  their faith.  the more you show them that you have thought this trough, the better they will feel about it.

Finally, remember that they may never feel 100% OK with it. You may have to wait untill you are out of their house before you make any official move. It may seem like forever to you, but in terms of your entier life, it's just a heartbeat.  It sounds like they (or at least your dad) are open to you at least doing the inital research. to me, that says a lot.  I don't think you will have much trouble, provided you really do your research and show them that you are approaching this maturely.

Good luck!!!
Passion is inversely proportional to the amount of real information available.

NOTE: This post is a natural product. The sleight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual charicter and beauty and in no way are to be considered flaws or defects.
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10 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2008 - 9:10PM #3
Prajna
Posts: 1,705
Bvarnell,

Didn't you just post about you wanting to convert to Catholicism just a few days ago? 

Perhaps you should slow down.  i'm not discouraging you from converting to the Orthodox Church, which i hold in much respect and awe, but wait till you get a little bit older to decide.
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10 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2008 - 9:10PM #4
Prajna
Posts: 1,705
Bvarnell,

Didn't you just post about you wanting to convert to Catholicism just a few days ago? 

Perhaps you should slow down.  i'm not discouraging you from converting to the Orthodox Church, which i hold in much respect and awe, but wait till you get a little bit older to decide.
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10 years ago  ::  Mar 14, 2008 - 12:06AM #5
Basil1951
Posts: 204
When I was 12, and again when I was 14, I steered my parents and siblings to attend a particular denomination rather than one that was more conveniently located near our home.  So sometimes, parents will listen to children on matters of faith.

I recommend discussing it very openly and straight forwardly.  Tell them why you want to become Orthodox.  Ask them to come with you and be there.  I can think of no greater gift to give someone than to introduce them to Orthodoxy.

I became Orthodox at the age of 46.  Becoming Orthodox for me was like having the proverbial "scales fall from my eyes" and seeing clearly for the first time in my life.   

May God grant us wisdom and have mercy on us all.
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10 years ago  ::  May 29, 2008 - 12:08AM #6
razzputin
Posts: 119
[QUOTE=Jane Sz;423372]There is a lovely book called A tiny step away from deepest faith, published about 2 years ago, written by a young girl (about 16) of Jewish background who became Orthodox after much searching. You might find it helpful. (I'm sorry I forget the author's name).[/QUOTE]

A Tiny Step Away From Deepest Faith: A Teenager's Search For Meaning (Paperback)
by Marjorie Corbman (Author)
$11.95@ Amazon.com
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