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Switch to Forum Live View The Boo-Birds - for Jane
9 years ago  ::  Sep 22, 2008 - 11:35PM #1
WaveringCC
Posts: 5,164
This is such a great name, and most of the posts about the boo-birds have been removed.  So, we'll just have to start a small, very exclusive club of two.   Others may participate as guests, but there are only two full members.  And, Jane, I think, we should adopt Tamayo - she is too young to be a Boo-Bird, but she can be a Baby-Boo.

Since Boo-Birds must be women of a "certain age", possessing that je ne sais quoi type of joie de vivre that comes with "maturity", we need a mentor for our exclusive club who is even more "mature" than we two are - to guide us into the next phase.  I vote for Joan Chittister, because of this:

She quotes Louis Kronenberger --  "Old age is an excellent time for outrage, My goal, he said, is to say or do at least one outrageous thing per week."

Later on she says:

"Old age is the time for letting out the spirit of outrage, the outrageous spirit that comes with having walked through the marketplace of life, choosing between its fruits, looking for its pleasures, tasting and discarding as we go. Now finally we know what is missing, know what is good, know what is needed.  ....Now we can let our spirits fly. We can do what our souls demand that fully human beings do. This is the moment for which we were born."

It's time to soar.
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9 years ago  ::  Sep 23, 2008 - 1:19AM #2
jane2
Posts: 14,295

WaveringCC wrote:

This is such a great name, and most of the posts about the boo-birds have been removed. So, we'll just have to start a small, very exclusive club of two. Others may participate as guests, but there are only two full members. And, Jane, I think, we should adopt Tamayo - she is too young to be a Boo-Bird, but she can be a Baby-Boo.

Since Boo-Birds must be women of a "certain age", possessing that je ne sais quoi type of joie de vivre that comes with "maturity", we need a mentor for our exclusive club who is even more "mature" than we two are - to guide us into the next phase. I vote for Joan Chittister, because of this:

She quotes Louis Kronenberger -- "Old age is an excellent time for outrage, My goal, he said, is to say or do at least one outrageous thing per week."

Later on she says:

"Old age is the time for letting out the spirit of outrage, the outrageous spirit that comes with having walked through the marketplace of life, choosing between its fruits, looking for its pleasures, tasting and discarding as we go. Now finally we know what is missing, know what is good, know what is needed. ....Now we can let our spirits fly. We can do what our souls demand that fully human beings do. This is the moment for which we were born."

It's time to soar.



Boo birds over the White Cilffs of Dover.

Tamayo come soar with us--we were doing this at your age, too. we were Baby Boos once, too.

Great quote by Joan Chitister: I don't think the wings of her soul were ever clipped, Deo Gratia.

We Boo Birds have lived life and found the grace of Joy in happiness even in the face of the distress that visits all. We have lived in the awesomness of THE CREATOR who has given us wings, not clipped them.

Right now I live in what is virtually a retired community and we love outrage
at so many levels.

Super post, Wavering. Small exclusive clubs are enchanting.

LMFO.......................Up the Boo Birds and our Baby Boos!!

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9 years ago  ::  Sep 23, 2008 - 4:53PM #3
Tamayo
Posts: 236
Teehee, I'd be honored to be a Baby Boo!

Although one has to wonder if I qualify... I'm just a person living in a world of Catholicism that I don't agree with. ;) Chances are, I will never come back to the church because I find it unconscionable and quite honestly, I'm not sure there IS a god. So can I really be considered a boo of any sort? Or maybe I'm just the ultimate boo... I boo even the things the Boo Birds don't boo? Teeheehee, who knows... or CARES! XD

Well regardless, I'm honored to even be thought of as a baby boo. I've hardly even stretched my wings, but to have met my two grown-up Boo Birds is more than an honor - it's opened my eyes! And it feels good! If I get to be a Boo Bird when I grow up like the great examples we have today on Bnet Catholic, I'd be pretty lucky, I think!

Cheers ladies!!!!!
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9 years ago  ::  Sep 23, 2008 - 9:27PM #4
jane2
Posts: 14,295

friendofsaints&angels wrote:

AHHH YESSS!!!! I am so happy that I have started such a new rage that you all are so proud of. maybe I should also start a club of fools, as I was so elequently named by Wavering, even though Jesus forbids us to do this. I am glad that you are having fun, and I wish you continued success in having a good laugh at my expense. God bless you both.



Sometimes it is dangerous to play with the big kids: you have to know their rules. Playground 101.................:)

Somewhere on these boards I read about someone who tried to bully John McEnroe on the playground. Made me laugh. I love Johhny McEnroe. His ads are hilarious, too.

When I was 3 and 4 we lived in the city with wide sidewalks. Sidewalk roller-skating was huge--on those steel unforgiving skates. I loved it.
Sometimes when the older boys came home from school they would invite me to skate with them cuz I was fast. Actually I was a little imp on those skates. Gotta know the rules, though.

Lighten up, friend. The world is a wonderful place if you look for the wonder. You called two of us a name and we've chosen to make light of it. On the playground if you start something it may come back atcha. We all have to learn how it works.

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9 years ago  ::  Sep 23, 2008 - 9:55PM #5
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Tamayo wrote:

Teehee, I'd be honored to be a Baby Boo!

Although one has to wonder if I qualify... I'm just a person living in a world of Catholicism that I don't agree with. ;) Chances are, I will never come back to the church because I find it unconscionable and quite honestly, I'm not sure there IS a god. So can I really be considered a boo of any sort? Or maybe I'm just the ultimate boo... I boo even the things the Boo Birds don't boo? Teeheehee, who knows... or CARES! XD

Well regardless, I'm honored to even be thought of as a baby boo. I've hardly even stretched my wings, but to have met my two grown-up Boo Birds is more than an honor - it's opened my eyes! And it feels good! If I get to be a Boo Bird when I grow up like the great examples we have today on Bnet Catholic, I'd be pretty lucky, I think!

Cheers ladies!!!!!



You are a great Baby-Boo Bird. If I listened to some of what you apparently doI I'd take wing for the hills and have.

We have so many posters here so bound up in the Church of JPII, rigid, etc.
Wavering and I are the Church of John XXIII, a man of great wisdom and compassion and foresight. He was no favorite of JPII, the taskmaster.

Let your own lights guide you : that's what Boo Birds do. We were actually taught to do that.

You are that breath of young fresh air the world needs. Many of us are meant to have wings and to actually think.

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9 years ago  ::  Sep 23, 2008 - 11:47PM #6
Tamayo
Posts: 236
[QUOTE=jane2;780173]You are a great Baby-Boo Bird. If I listened to some of what you apparently doI I'd take wing for the hills and have.

We have so many posters here so bound up in the Church of JPII, rigid, etc.
Wavering and I are the Church of John XXIII, a man of great wisdom and compassion and foresight. He was no favorite of JPII, the taskmaster.

Let your own lights guide you : that's what Boo Birds do. We were actually taught to do that.

You are that breath of young fresh air the world needs. Many of us are meant to have wings and to actually think.[/QUOTE]

Yes, it's becoming quite clear to me that I am probably more a product of my times than anything else. I knew of no other pope before JPII, and I was educated in a poorly-managed CCD program that pretty much only taught the details of Mass and the physical church, and the broader Christian themes. We were not even taught the Apostle's Creed, if you can believe it. If there was any strictly Catholic material in there beyond the mechanics of Mass, it went over my head, which would have been a feat considering I have always been a pretty good student, if a bit imaginative. As I've mentioned before on Bnet, my Catholic upbringing was negligible... I can remember my dad grumbling over the changes that were taking place during Mass, such as the holding of hands upwards during the Our Father in imitation of the priests ("We're not priests, we're laypeople, our job isn't to imitate priests"). I can recall him retelling his days as an altar boy and making comments about how he didn't really enjoy it, but the job did have its perks. To this day my mom takes Communion when she goes to church, but has started reexploring her Lutheran roots now that my brother and I are effectively emancipated.

These are the sorts of things that have shaped who I am as a (non)believer. I actually grew up in South Bend, IN, if you can believe that - the center of all things Catholic in the Midwest, it seems. My peers had parents teaching at Notre Dame, and we were all a primarily Catholic bunch, even though we were in public schooling. And despite many many of my peers being Catholic, and all of us attending the same CCDs and going through the sacraments all at the same time, there never, to me anyway, seemed to be much sense of religious community or devotion among my peers. We were doing it because our parents told us to - if you had asked our parents why they told us to, most probably couldn't give well thought out answers. That's just how it was and to me it was completely normal - it still is! I didn't realize there was such a religious contingient of people out there till I got to college! "Evangelical" was not even in my vocabulary till about the time I had graduated from HS. This was the environment I grew up in and while some around here would say that it is shameful I grew up in such "hedonism" or whatever, I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed it and would love to raise my own children in such an environment, too. It was quite a shock to me to be thrown into college where religion was actually a topic you talked about freely amongst your peers. Up until that point, it was something we all collectively tolerated, but no one ever felt like certain groups should band together against the rest of our peers, or talk about openly. It's quite possible that was because there was a Catholic majority, but that never stopped my best friend who (admittedly, it got quite annoying after so many years) would pass out Hannukah cookies, dreidels, and do a little presentation of Judaism every holiday time. At times she hated it - like when we watched Schindler's List in World History - but her struggle was the most religious content/discussion that ever happened in my tiny little piece of that world.

If my lack of "correct" catechism has led me to be a free and critical thinker, and to have best friends from many religions and backgrounds, then I think I'm better for it. I wish one day my children can grow up in such a world where religion is something they can come to on their own in their timeframe, instead of having it rammed down their throat as I see with other Catholics around me. When one can only see the world through the eyes that the church has deemed "the right way," I worry for them...
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9 years ago  ::  Sep 23, 2008 - 11:59PM #7
WaveringCC
Posts: 5,164

Tamayo wrote:

Yes, it's becoming quite clear to me that I am probably more a product of my times than anything else. I knew of no other pope before JPII, and I was educated in a poorly-managed CCD program that pretty much only taught the details of Mass and the physical church, and the broader Christian themes. We were not even taught the Apostle's Creed, if you can believe it. If there was any strictly Catholic material in there beyond the mechanics of Mass, it went over my head, which would have been a feat considering I have always been a pretty good student, if a bit imaginative. As I've mentioned before on Bnet, my Catholic upbringing was negligible... I can remember my dad grumbling over the changes that were taking place during Mass, such as the holding of hands upwards during the Our Father in imitation of the priests ("We're not priests, we're laypeople, our job isn't to imitate priests"). I can recall him retelling his days as an altar boy and making comments about how he didn't really enjoy it, but the job did have its perks. To this day my mom takes Communion when she goes to church, but has started reexploring her Lutheran roots now that my brother and I are effectively emancipated.

These are the sorts of things that have shaped who I am as a (non)believer. I actually grew up in South Bend, IN, if you can believe that - the center of all things Catholic in the Midwest, it seems. My peers had parents teaching at Notre Dame, and we were all a primarily Catholic bunch, even though we were in public schooling. And despite many many of my peers being Catholic, and all of us attending the same CCDs and going through the sacraments all at the same time, there never, to me anyway, seemed to be much sense of religious community or devotion among my peers. We were doing it because our parents told us to - if you had asked our parents why they told us to, most probably couldn't give well thought out answers. That's just how it was and to me it was completely normal - it still is! I didn't realize there was such a religious contingient of people out there till I got to college! "Evangelical" was not even in my vocabulary till about the time I had graduated from HS. This was the environment I grew up in and while some around here would say that it is shameful I grew up in such "hedonism" or whatever, I have to say I thoroughly enjoyed it and would love to raise my own children in such an environment, too. It was quite a shock to me to be thrown into college where religion was actually a topic you talked about freely amongst your peers. Up until that point, it was something we all collectively tolerated, but no one ever felt like certain groups should band together against the rest of our peers, or talk about openly. It's quite possible that was because there was a Catholic majority, but that never stopped my best friend who (admittedly, it got quite annoying after so many years) would pass out Hannukah cookies, dreidels, and do a little presentation of Judaism every holiday time. At times she hated it - like when we watched Schindler's List in World History - but her struggle was the most religious content/discussion that ever happened in my tiny little piece of that world.

If my lack of "correct" catechism has led me to be a free and critical thinker, and to have best friends from many religions and backgrounds, then I think I'm better for it. I wish one day my children can grow up in such a world where religion is something they can come to on their own in their timeframe, instead of having it rammed down their throat as I see with other Catholics around me. When one can only see the world through the eyes that the church has deemed "the right way," I worry for them...



I don't have much time tonight. Just wanted to second Jane - you are a "baby boo" because of the way you think - you are not constrained, you seek, you are open.  Your spiritual path (everyone has one) is yours, and you will find it and follow it because of the openness. It may be Catholic, or Christian or Buddhist or nothing that is structured, but we can see from your spirit that you will find it and not allow others to define it for you.

One quick story.  Although I have been a non-conventional Catholic since college, (aka "cafeteria catholic", dissenter, etc), I did raise my kids in the church. BUT, I raised them to question everything, to never accept what they were taught without thinking it through themselves. I told them that each person is on a spiritual journey, but it is one each person has to make for himself or herself.  Their religious upbringing would give them a foundation, a beginning way to start figuring it all out, but that it was not necessarily going to be their permanent path- something they would have to discern for themselves.

When they hit confirmation age (13 in our parish), I told them it was their decision to make.  They knew I meant it, and there would be no pressure (my husband isn't Catholic, so the conversation was pretty much between Mom and kid).  One decided to be confirmed at 13, even though I did pressure him a bit - to wait!   I feel that this decision is one that should not be made until young people are at least mid-teens.  But, he went ahead with it mostly because of peer pressure from his buddies.  One  son decided to be confirmed when he was 17.  The third has never been confirmed.

The pastor at our parish was very unhappy with me.  He wanted me to demand that the boys be confirmed and on schedule.  I told him that the church taught that confirmation was supposed to represent an independent decision by a young person, who could not make that decision about baptism.  We made it then, but it was up to them to decide about confirmation.  He said that maybe that was what the church officially said about Confirmation but that I should have made sure the kids did it anyway!

Have an open and seeking spirit and heart, and you will find your path!

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9 years ago  ::  Sep 25, 2008 - 9:04PM #8
Mareczku
Posts: 2,220
Greetings Boo Birds.  I left a message for you over at the Catholic Retreat House.  Hope all is well with my progressive friends. 

Peace & Love - Mark
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9 years ago  ::  Sep 23, 2008 - 5:49PM #9
friendofsaints&angels
Posts: 1,327
AHHH YESSS!!!! I am so happy that I have started such a new rage that you all are so proud of. maybe I should also start a club of fools, as I was so elequently named by Wavering, even though Jesus forbids us to do this. I am glad that you are having fun, and I wish you continued success in having a good laugh at my expense. God bless you both.
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