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Switch to Forum Live View Why did you become a Catholic?
7 years ago  ::  Jan 23, 2008 - 4:45PM #1
rizen33
Posts: 7
Hey guys,

I'm interested in attending some of the Catholic meetings/services and learning more about Catholicism.  Therefore, may I ask why out of countless of religions (and numerous divisions in Christianity alone), what are some of the factors and reasons that helped you decide to become a Catholic?

Thank You and Blessings

edit - I just read the post "Questions About Catholicism," I apologize if this post is in the wrong section.
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 23, 2008 - 10:10PM #2
Apishapa
Posts: 276
rizen33   

If you will go to "ADVICE ON TRYING AGAIN"  you can read what I just posted and perhaps that is something that may interest you.  Please let me know, and I can share more.   

Praise God!
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 24, 2008 - 8:44PM #3
rjak134
Posts: 320
[QUOTE=rizen33;235459]Hey guys,

I'm interested in attending some of the Catholic meetings/services and learning more about Catholicism.  Therefore, may I ask why out of countless of religions (and numerous divisions in Christianity alone), what are some of the factors and reasons that helped you decide to become a Catholic?

Thank You and Blessings

edit - I just read the post "Questions About Catholicism," I apologize if this post is in the wrong section.[/QUOTE]

I just entered the Church this most recent Easter, so your question is one that is still pretty fresh in my mind from personal experience.  I'll do my best to answer it.

I'll begin by quoting from GK Chesterton's essay "Why I am a Catholic" (which everyone should definitely read in its entirety, available online here: http://www.chesterton.org/gkc/theologia … tholic.htm ) Chesterton opens his essay with the following words:  "The difficulty of explaining "why I am a Catholic" is that there are ten thousand reasons all amounting to one reason: that Catholicism is true."

The reasons that I joined the Catholic Church are various, some more personal, some more theological.  I came from being a very high-church Episcopalian, so I had a strong sacramental understanding already, and that naturally lead me to be very close to Catholicism (I'd been regularly attending Catholic parishes for daily mass for a good while before I even considered conversion, just b/c Episcopal churches didn't offer services during the week where I live).  Also, as you may have heard, the Episcopal Church in America has been in the business of coming up with new doctrines a great deal in recent years (to be fair to them, they sincerely believe that they are listening to the Spirit, guiding them in new ways).  I'm a student of the Church Fathers, though (as in that's what I'm majoring in & plan to go to grad school in), and I saw how inconsistent my community's beliefs were with those of the early Church.  So I shopped around to figure out who hadn't changed the doctrines, and I found that really only Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy have legitimate claims in that regard, to continuity with the early Church.  I ended up with Catholicism largely on account of the Papacy, which I believe is Scripturally supported and divinely instituted to be a guard and a uniting force for the Church throughout the ages.

Ultimately, there are a lot of different reasons to be a Catholic.  There is the Eucharist and the other sacraments, there are the saints, there is the universality of the Church (both in space and in time), there is the unity of the Faith, there is the continuity with the early Church.  But what all these reasons amount to is, as Chesterton said, one reason.  The Catholic Church is the "one, holy, Catholic, and apostolic Church" spoken of in the Creeds, founded by Christ, preserved in Truth by the Holy Spirit, and which will be waiting faithfully for the Lord when He returns in glory.  That is why I am a Catholic.
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7 years ago  ::  Feb 01, 2008 - 2:36PM #4
Burks1999
Posts: 64
I just joined this past Easter and the more I read and learned the more I knew it was right and the truth. It felt likr the most natural thing I've ever done!! Just to sum it up quickly!!
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 04, 2008 - 12:31AM #5
carryurcross73
Posts: 2
I feel the reason why I am catholic is because after a long search (even after I was baptized at 15) led me to being Catholic. All the other churches I tried, books I read on other religions, etc did nothing compared to what Catholicism has done for me. I feel more close to God through his church. The holy spirit led me here and I have no regrets. I suggest going to mass and reading books and the bible and let the holy spirit lead you into the church. I suggest Scott Hahn books because he comes from a different background then catholic and discusses many issues that people have with the religion. I hope this helps and God bless.

Amber
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 05, 2008 - 1:20AM #6
kmg123
Posts: 1
I also came from the Episcopal Church. I had been deeply drawn to the tradition of peaceful witness in our world that many Christian (and non-Christian) religious groups shared--Episcopalian, Quaker, Catholic.

Fundamentally, especially when I was working in Latin America, and found myself in Catholic Churches, I felt very intensely at home in these communities--no matter the language (English, Spanish, indigenous) in which mass was conducted in.

This lead to the slow decision, taken over several years, to explore becoming Catholic. This was odd because I definitely have some resistences to it--If I were pope, I'd do things a bit differently--women, contraception, the role of the laity... But fundamentally, my connection to the Eucharist and connection to the worldwide community  was such a strong and persistent call that a few Easters ago I joined, willing to accept the Church as it is. While I'm always going to be a skeptic in some ways, I feel excited about my new membership in the CC. My rational/feminist mind sometimes is baffled, but I my heart knows that this is a manner of God working in extremely mysterious ways and the thing to do is embrace it, no matter the suprise it might bring.
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 05, 2008 - 6:11PM #7
Mareczku
Posts: 2,220
I was born Catholic and never left.  I think that the Catholic Church is greatly enriched by people of other faiths that join.  We are one, holy, catholic and apostolic.  I think the Eucharist is at the heart of our faith.  Even many Christian faiths do not celebrate the Eucharist as we do.  Throught the Eucharist we are united to Christ and also to each other in faith.  God bless you all.

Peace - Mareczku
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 10, 2008 - 1:55PM #8
habu
Posts: 3
As someone who has low regard for the way our society treats the marginalized, fosters intolerance and encourages the secular culture's obsessions with materialism, competition, physical beauty and narcissism, I wasn't sure exactly what it was I was looking for, but I knew it had to be counter-cultural.

For a while, I was a socialist.  Then, I noticed that succesful socialists (even Euro-style democratic socialists) usually became tyrants to varying degrees.  Then, I was a transcendentalist.  Then, I noticed that eventually most transcendentalists became spirtually bankrupt after spending years shutting themselves up looking for their "true selves".  It was after all that that I realized the most counter-cultural thing one could be was a Roman Catholic!  Successful Catholics became people like Mother Teresa, Thomas Merton, Teilhard De Chardin and St. Francis (and the list could go on and on).  It's hard to find a more illustrious list of folks that run counter to this culture than that!  There had to be more to this path than was evident in all the larger society's prejudical pronouncements against Rome.  That epiphany (if you will) was my beginning.
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 18, 2008 - 6:59PM #9
Emmanuelle110
Posts: 108
I was born and raised Catholic but in recent years, I guess I would call myself a "born-again" Christian.  This is in large part because I sat back and thought about what would happen after death.  This life seems long but ultimately, it's very short and it's like one huge test.  Now, in school I always strived to do well on tests and I thought to myself, "If I try so hard on those tests, why am I not trying as much on this more important test?"  The thought of spending eternity in Hell is the farthest thing from joyful in my mind.  I want to know that, come judgment day, Jesus will embrace me with open arms because I followed His Word and passed His test.

I guess I always believed everything the Catholic Church preached, but I never really put it into practice until very recently.  People may criticize the church, but don't forget that what the church teaches is love, humility, respect, and peace.  So if others want to put down Catholicism, it truly is their loss.  I wish the best for everyone and I hope that you all (non-religious as well) find God's love and return it.  Not just to Him, but to all your brothers and sisters, for you should try to see people in a good light--just as you would want God to see you.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2008 - 2:44PM #10
Crickhollow
Posts: 34
I was raised in a high-Lutheran Church prior to the begining of the ELCA.  It  de facto split over the inclusion of some Charismatic members who had no use for the liturgy.  After years away, I tried to find the Lutheran Church of my early childhood, only to find it does not exist anywhere as far as I could tell.  I miss the liturgy, so I've attended Catholic masses off and on for the last few years, and am a big fan of the Catholic network, EWTN. 

I have of course, no problem with the liturgy.  I like the idea of the community of saints, but the idea of praying to them still feels odd.  I am a big fan of Chesterton and Justin Martyr.  I'm getting used to the idea of the Real Presence, though Lutherans that I used to know never thought of Holy Communion as merely symbolic anyway.  My two biggest hurdles are the papal infallibility/ex cathedra issue, and the Immaculate Conception of Mary.    I don't think I can become a Catholic because of those issues, but being a Protestant doesn't cut it for me anymore.

Scott Hahn is a bit steep for me.  Any advice from you folks who have made the switch or never left?
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