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Switch to Forum Live View Liturgy of the hours
10 years ago  ::  Apr 14, 2008 - 9:20PM #31
Barzillai
Posts: 39
Originally the Liturgy of the Hours was what all Christians viewed as a way they could pray throughout the day --- it was not just for priests, sisters, nuns.  It was the daily prayer of the regular Christian as well.  Of course, not everyone could or did pray all of the Hours --- due to their work and family duties.  Over time the LOH was prayed more and more by the priests, sisters, nuns, and monks.

That is changing today, we are coming full circle, when the LOH is viewed as a form of prayer that regular Christians can also pray as their lifestyles and duties allow. If you explore the LOH, don't create an extra burden in your life.  Do what is comfortable.

+Peace,

John
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 14, 2008 - 11:34PM #32
Barzillai
Posts: 39
The Liturgy of the Hours

1174 The mystery of Christ, his Incarnation and Passover, which we celebrate in the Eucharist especially at the Sunday assembly, permeates and transfigures the time of each day, through the celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours, "the divine office."46 This celebration, faithful to the apostolic exhortations to "pray constantly," is "so devised that the whole course of the day and night is made holy by the praise of God."47 In this "public prayer of the Church,"48 the faithful (clergy, religious, and lay people) exercise the royal priesthood of the baptized. Celebrated in "the form approved" by the Church, the Liturgy of the Hours "is truly the voice of the Bride herself addressed to her Bridegroom. It is the very prayer which Christ himself together with his Body addresses to the Father.49

1175 The Liturgy of the Hours is intended to become the prayer of the whole People of God. In it Christ himself "continues his priestly work through his Church."50 His members participate according to their own place in the Church and the circumstances of their lives: priests devoted to the pastoral ministry, because they are called to remain diligent in prayer and the service of the word; religious, by the charism of their consecrated lives; all the faithful as much as possible: "Pastors of souls should see to it that the principal hours, especially Vespers, are celebrated in common in church on Sundays and on the more solemn feasts. The laity, too, are encouraged to recite the divine office, either with the priests, or among themselves, or even individually."51

1176 The celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours demands not only harmonizing the voice with the praying heart, but also a deeper "understanding of the liturgy and of the Bible, especially of the Psalms."52

1177 The hymns and litanies of the Liturgy of the Hours integrate the prayer of the psalms into the age of the Church, expressing the symbolism of the time of day, the liturgical season, or the feast being celebrated. Moreover, the reading from the Word of God at each Hour (with the subsequent responses or troparia) and readings from the Fathers and spiritual masters at certain Hours, reveal more deeply the meaning of the mystery being celebrated, assist in understanding the psalms, and prepare for silent prayer. The lectio divina, where the Word of God is so read and meditated that it becomes prayer, is thus rooted in the liturgical celebration.

1178 The Liturgy of the Hours, which is like an extension of the Eucharistic celebration, does not exclude but rather in a complementary way calls forth the various devotions of the People of God, especially adoration and worship of the Blessed Sacrament.



All of the above is a quote from

CATECHISM OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 16, 2008 - 9:06PM #33
Barzillai
Posts: 39
I was drawn to the Liturgy of the Hours because it was one way to practice what the early Christians practiced.
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2008 - 7:06AM #34
Mysty101
Posts: 2,025
Hi John,

Thanks so much for all the info. (sorry I've not been around much---work & new baby) It's been a while, and I don't even remember how I became aware of the hours, but I think I started praying because I wanted to unite my personal prayer with the formal prayer of priests & religious.

I do like the idea of uniting prayer with others.  We started praying the Novena to the Sacred Heart on Friday after the 9:00 am Mass, and I have invited hundreds of people to join us, both on line, and in person.  At the hospital I sometimes give the prayer card to patients, and write "Friday 9:30 am" on the back, and invite them to join us.

SuZ
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 18, 2008 - 2:19PM #35
Barzillai
Posts: 39
I am joking of course. :)

The suggestion of propaganda alone (in the good sense) is the subject of one of many excellent blogs on liturgy by Derek the Anglican at Haligweorc Blog.

The blog is actually a call for papers. If you have the time to join in this project, I know Derek would appreciate any input. And having his blog link allows you to follow the progress of this super project which will, in itself, be good press for the Liturgy of the Hours.
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2008 - 2:50PM #36
Everett_Marx
Posts: 1
I was introduced to this while in seminary and kept the 'habit' despite leaving seminary. The first thing I reach for in the morning is the Breviary (-I have the 4-volume set) and it's the last thing I read before falling asleep.

I never *thought* it would mean so much to me, but now I loathe the thought of life without it!
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 22, 2008 - 5:16AM #37
Mysty101
Posts: 2,025
Hi Everett,

And welcome to the forum.  I read your profile, and wonder if there is anything you would care to discuss. 

Perhaps start another thread if the topic is not LOTH.

I wish I could get into the habit of praying the hours more faithfully. 

SuZ
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 24, 2008 - 10:56PM #38
Barzillai
Posts: 39
B16 said the following during a meeting with representatives of other religions at the "Rotunda" Hall of the Pope John Paul II Cultural Center of Washington. Full statement is here.

"There is a further point I wish to touch upon here. I have noticed a growing interest among governments to sponsor programs intended to promote interreligious and intercultural dialogue. These are praiseworthy initiatives. At the same time, religious freedom, interreligious dialogue and faith-based education aim at something more than a consensus regarding ways to implement practical strategies for advancing peace. The broader purpose of dialogue is to discover the truth. What is the origin and destiny of mankind? What are good and evil? What awaits us at the end of our earthly existence? Only by addressing these deeper questions can we build a solid basis for the peace and security of the human family, for "wherever and whenever men and women are enlightened by the splendor of truth, they naturally set out on the path of peace" (Message for the 2006 World Day of Peace, 3)."

"We are living in an age when these questions are too often marginalized. Yet they can never be erased from the human heart. Throughout history, men and women have striven to articulate their restlessness with this passing world. In the Judeo-Christian tradition, the Psalms are full of such expressions: "My spirit is overwhelmed within me" (Ps 143:4; cf. Ps 6:6; 31:10; 32:3; 38:8; 77:3); "why are you cast down, my soul, why groan within me?" (Ps 42:5). The response is always one of faith: "Hope in God, I will praise him still; my Savior and my God" (Ps 42:5, 11; cf. Ps 43:5; 62:5). Spiritual leaders have a special duty, and we might say competence, to place the deeper questions at the forefront of human consciousness, to reawaken mankind to the mystery of human existence, and to make space in a frenetic world for reflection and prayer."

The Liturgy of the Hours is an ancient way to consecrate our time and pray from the Psalms.
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 25, 2008 - 1:44PM #39
rubypoet
Posts: 70
[QUOTE=Mysty101;419618]Hi Br John,

Yes, prayer is so important, and so helpful to us.

A friend spoke of a conversation with a vocations director, who had the sad job of interviewing priests and seminarians who were leaving. 

One question was "when did you stop praying the hours?"

No one ever responded that they hadn't stopped.

SuZ[/QUOTE]

Isn't that sad, it rather makes one think that if they'd kept up their prayers, they might not be in that position, that crisis of faith.  I'm going to log onto your thread about the prayer of the hours, thank you very much!
Good Luck and Happy Landings, Rebecca in Tucson, AZ
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10 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2008 - 10:45PM #40
Mysty101
Posts: 2,025
Hi Ruby,

And welcome to the Cloisters.

We're here, if you wish to discuss anything.

SuZ
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