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Flag pio_child January 20, 2008 2:14 PM EST
[FONT="Comic Sans MS"][COLOR="Sienna"] I was watching a rebroadcast of The Journey Home on EWTN last evening. They were talking about praying the Liturgy of the Hours. How much it changed his life. He also mentioned there was a 1 book volume. When I hear of the Liturgy of the Hours I think of regular and long prayers. I am a working man, that would love a regular prayer life, but have few hours in a day. Is this possible?[/COLOR][/FONT]
Flag Mysty101 January 20, 2008 2:34 PM EST
Hi Pio,

Welcome to the Cloisters.

And thank you for bringing this up....I do want to have a thread on the hours in this forum.  I did post the "O Antiphons" (which are a part of evening prayer the last week in Advent), and was intending to bring up the hours this week.

The one volume book is [COLOR="RoyalBlue"]"Christian Prayer"[/COLOR]   which has morning & evening prayer, and some of the other hours.  You are under no obligation to pray them all, so whatever you can pray is a great start, and it is a wonderful benefit to you.

Most of the hours contain psalms, a reading, and some intercessions.

[COLOR="RoyalBlue"]------> Hours on-line[/COLOR]

We are here if you want to ask any questions or discuss the hours.

Suz
Flag pio_child January 20, 2008 5:46 PM EST
[COLOR="Sienna"]Thanks for your quick response.[/COLOR]
Flag Mysty101 January 20, 2008 6:33 PM EST
You are very welcome.

There is also "Shorter Christian Prayer"  which is just morning & evening prayer.  This is what many lay people use to pray the hours.

SuZ
Flag Mysty101 March 15, 2008 4:10 AM EDT
Hi again,

I have been trying to pray the hours more during Lent.  This is such a wonderful way to deepen our prayer life, and we are shown which scriptures help our medition on this holy season.

SuZ
Flag Barzillai April 7, 2008 7:50 AM EDT
It has been over two years it seems since I last posted anywhere on Beliefnet, and I was very pleased to return and see this wonderful forum -- Catholic Cloisters.   The thread on the Liturgy of Hours (LOH) is a key interest of mine and I hope this thread causes more interest and discussion in this ancient practice. 

I use the Universalis web site on my handheld devise when I am away from the office or home and want to pray the LOH. I especially like the calendar they have.

John
Flag brjohnbc April 8, 2008 12:45 PM EDT
Hey Pio,

I used to think that I had such a busy life that I didn't have time to pray, however, as others have suggested, you can adapt the LOH to modern day life.  You have to remember that the LOH and others like it, were originally intended for life in the monastic communities not the home and work of the secular life.  I'm sure if you checked out your local religious book store that you would find many books on "home prayers."

I know that working people find it difficult to set aside time, but could I be so bold as to make a couple of suggestions?  You and I are friends so I know you will take it in the spirit intended.

Get out of bed a little earlier and pray ... you'll be pleasantly surprised how much of a difference this one little jesture will make in your day.   Pray while driving your car (but keep your eyes on the road.)  During lunch break ... some people have an hour, some 1/2 hour.  If you have the longer version of lunch .. take 15 minutes to pray ... shorter version ... pray while eating!  God doesn't care ... just pray.  Evening ... (and you know what's coming) a little less time with EWTN and some time in prayer .. LOL.

It has been my personal experience that no matter how busy one's life is .. there is always time for prayer if you only look for it.

Blessings
Br. John

P.S.   EWTN is my favourite channel and sometimes I just can't tear myself away.
Flag Mysty101 April 9, 2008 8:28 AM EDT
[QUOTE=Barzillai;414116]It has been over two years it seems since I last posted anywhere on Beliefnet, and I was very pleased to return and see this wonderful forum -- Catholic Cloisters.   The thread on the Liturgy of Hours (LOH) is a key interest of mine and I hope this thread causes more interest and discussion in this ancient practice. 

John[/QUOTE]

Hi John,

...and welcome to our quiet little prayer place.

Sorry I didn't get back to you sooner---My daughter just gave birth to her second baby last week, and mommy hen has been quite busy.

I love to pray the hours in community.  My parish only does Tenebrae during the Triduum, but another parish nearby prays the psalms at 9:00am Mass.

[QUOTE]I use the Universalis web site on my handheld devise when I am away from the office or home and want to pray the LOH. I especially like the calendar they have.[/QUOTE]

I usually use Christian Prayer for the morning & evening hours, and the psalms of the office, and universalis for the readings of the office.  Yes, the calendar is great. 

Again welcome.

SuZ
Flag Mysty101 April 9, 2008 8:31 AM EDT
Hi Br John,

Yes, prayer is so important, and so helpful to us.

A friend spoke of a conversation with a vocations director, who had the sad job of interviewing priests and seminarians who were leaving. 

One question was "when did you stop praying the hours?"

No one ever responded that they hadn't stopped.

SuZ
Flag brjohnbc April 9, 2008 11:33 AM EDT
Good morning,

I remember well when I first started praying the hours.  I remember thinking ... oh heaven's, this is going to be so difficult!  As time went on and I settled into the rhythm of the monastic tradition of praying the hours it became much easier.  Not only did it become much easier, it became the force behind my daily routine.  When I have to miss an office for one reason or another the day just doesn't feel complete.  I remember one time somebody giving me this little saying ... I still don't know where it came from ... "To be a person of prayer, you must first become prayer."  I didn't quite know what to make of it at the time, and I continue to reflect on it often, but our lives should be a prayer and reflect the Love of God within us!  Everything we say and do should be a prayer as unto the Lord.

In the Benedictine Ethos we read:  "Prayer is not the only thing worth doing in this world, but without prayer, nothing else is done as well nor are things kept in proper perspective."  That is something we should all reflect on.  We are nothing without prayer.

Blessings
Br. John
Flag Shaner April 9, 2008 3:52 PM EDT

Barzillai wrote:

It has been over two years it seems since I last posted anywhere on Beliefnet, and I was very pleased to return and see this wonderful forum -- Catholic Cloisters. The thread on the Liturgy of Hours (LOH) is a key interest of mine and I hope this thread causes more interest and discussion in this ancient practice.

I use the Universalis web site on my handheld devise when I am away from the office or home and want to pray the LOH. I especially like the calendar they have.

John



Hello Barzillai,

You say the the LOH is an ancient practise.........how far back can it be traced to?

Peace,
Sandy

Flag Barzillai April 10, 2008 10:11 AM EDT
Hi SuZ,

Congratulations on your new grandchild!  And certainly there is no need to apologize — you deserve all the time away from your Beliefnet hosting tasks — no one will think that you are not spending your time where you belong. 

My daughter had her first baby nine months ago — we watch him twice a week.

Thank you so much for the kind welcome.  The picture is so cute of both of the them.

John
Flag Barzillai April 10, 2008 10:30 AM EDT
[QUOTE=brjohnbc;420050]Good morning,

I remember well when I first started praying the hours.  I remember thinking ... oh heaven's, this is going to be so difficult!  As time went on and I settled into the rhythm of the monastic tradition of praying the hours it became much easier.  Not only did it become much easier, it became the force behind my daily routine.  When I have to miss an office for one reason or another the day just doesn't feel complete.  I remember one time somebody giving me this little saying ... I still don't know where it came from ... "To be a person of prayer, you must first become prayer."  I didn't quite know what to make of it at the time, and I continue to reflect on it often, but our lives should be a prayer and reflect the Love of God within us!  Everything we say and do should be a prayer as unto the Lord.

In the Benedictine Ethos we read:  "Prayer is not the only thing worth doing in this world, but without prayer, nothing else is done as well nor are things kept in proper perspective."  That is something we should all reflect on.  We are nothing without prayer.

Blessings
Br. John[/QUOTE]

Hi Br. John,

Thank you so much for your insights. 

I started to quote just the single phrase in your post that meant the most to me — the part that spoke directly to my own experience in praying the Liturgy of the Hours.  So, I highlighted a portion, then thought no, I need to highlight some more to get the whole idea — well, as you can see I could not leave any part out!

As a life-long former atheist and after 20 years in the evangelical (Reformed/Baptist) tradition, I was surprised that the Divine Offices are so easily a path to freedom for the heart — rather than a burden each day.  Coming home to the Catholic church is a joy and the prayer practices are only one part — as you know.

+Peace,
John
Flag brjohnbc April 10, 2008 2:08 PM EDT
Dear to Christ John,

Sounds like you and I have had some of the same experiences.  I never left God, but I did leave the church for some time.  I went on a "spiritual journey" which is just a polite way of saying I went looking for God instead of being still and letting God find me!

As much as I dislike labels .. I am an Anglo-Catholic not Roman but I just want to say that I am glad and I'm sure that all the saints and angels are rejoicing that you have found your way home.  People say that you should take time to smell the roses .. I agree because roses are God's creation but you should also remember Psalm 46: 10 "Be Still And Know That I Am God."  That is how I made my return and continue in my faith today .... I took the time to be still and "Listen With The Ear Of My Heart."

Blessings to you and yours in all things.

Br. John
Flag brjohnbc April 10, 2008 2:14 PM EDT
Sandy

Here is a page that might help to answer your question.

http://ewtn.com/expert/answers/breviary.htm

Blessings
Br. John
Flag Barzillai April 10, 2008 2:29 PM EDT
[QUOTE=Shaner;420717]Hello Barzillai,

You say the the LOH is an ancient practise.........how far back can it be traced to?

Peace,
Sandy[/QUOTE]

Sandy,

Thank you for the question!  This IS one of my favorite topics — the LOH in general and its ancient roots in particular.  The 2500-3000-year-old history of daily praying the Songs (Psalms) of God’s people is perhaps the world’s oldest, daily religious practice.  I even chuckle a bit at thinking that we might have been given a hint in the fact that largest book in the Bible and the book that occupies the center of the Bible just happens to be Psalms. 

Anyway, that last part was just my own rambling, you asked about how far back the Liturgy of the Hours goes.  Here is the reference I like it because it points to the growing practice of praying the LOH among lay people, which I believe will be a key force, central to the renewal of the Church that is talked about by the Popes:   

The following is a quote from the Abbey of the Genesee Cistercian monks in Piffard, New York.

http://www.geneseeabbey.org/divine-office.html

“The official prayer of the Roman Catholic Church is known variously as Liturgy of the Hours, Divine Office, Opus Dei (Work of God). The roots of this prayer go all the way back to Jewish practices before the time of our Lord. This form of prayer was prayed by Jesus and his disciples. As such, it was carried over into the devotion of the early Christian Church and continues in an unbroken tradition down to our own day.

“In both the Jewish and Christian traditions, this work of God was the prayer of all the people, clergy and laity. Due to various circumstances however, in the Christian Church it soon became the particular prayer of clergy and monks for many centuries. One of the blessings flowing from the liturgical reforms of Vatican II is the resurgence of the Divine Office among the laity. For our purposes we will refer to this form of prayer as the Work of God since that is the traditional Benedictine term.”

+Peace to your heart,
John
Flag Barzillai April 10, 2008 2:42 PM EDT
Sandy and Br. John, I wrote and then posted my response to Sandy before I saw Br. John's excellent reference.  As you can see from Br. John's reference, the LOH can trace its roots to long ago. I will add Br. John's link to my list of references.

+Peace
John
Flag Shaner April 10, 2008 3:40 PM EDT

brjohnbc wrote:

Sandy

Here is a page that might help to answer your question.

http://ewtn.com/expert/answers/breviary.htm

Blessings
Br. John



Hello Br. John,

Thank you for the link, its very comprehensive, educational, appreciate your help,

Peace,
Sandy

Flag Shaner April 10, 2008 4:05 PM EDT
Hello John,

Thank you so much for your wonderful reply, unfortunately I have to log-off right now, but I'll be back to reply to your Post!

Peace,
Sandy
Flag brjohnbc April 10, 2008 7:11 PM EDT
John ... thanks for the link, I love to read various monastic sites.

Blessings
Br. John

Community of St. Barnabas the Apostle
Flag Barzillai April 10, 2008 9:22 PM EDT
Br. John,

Me too, the Internet gives everyone a library unheard of before. Can you imagine what those early Benedictine monks would have been able to do if they had the Internet? I heard recently on EWTN (Eternal Word Television Network for those who do not know of this channel — I know Br. John is a big fan) that virtually every ancient scroll that survived to the 700's has survived to today — thanks to the monks. Their contribution to the preservation of Western civilization is remarkable.

And, of course, they prayed the Liturgy of the Hours.
Flag Shaner April 11, 2008 8:31 AM EDT

Barzillai wrote:

Sandy,

Thank you for the question! This IS one of my favorite topics — the LOH in general and its ancient roots in particular. The 2500-3000-year-old history of daily praying the Songs (Psalms) of God’s people is perhaps the world’s oldest, daily religious practice. I even chuckle a bit at thinking that we might have been given a hint in the fact that largest book in the Bible and the book that occupies the center of the Bible just happens to be Psalms.

Anyway, that last part was just my own rambling, you asked about how far back the Liturgy of the Hours goes. Here is the reference I like it because it points to the growing practice of praying the LOH among lay people, which I believe will be a key force, central to the renewal of the Church that is talked about by the Popes:

The following is a quote from the Abbey of the Genesee Cistercian monks in Piffard, New York.

http://www.geneseeabbey.org/divine-office.html

“The official prayer of the Roman Catholic Church is known variously as Liturgy of the Hours, Divine Office, Opus Dei (Work of God). The roots of this prayer go all the way back to Jewish practices before the time of our Lord. This form of prayer was prayed by Jesus and his disciples. As such, it was carried over into the devotion of the early Christian Church and continues in an unbroken tradition down to our own day.

“In both the Jewish and Christian traditions, this work of God was the prayer of all the people, clergy and laity. Due to various circumstances however, in the Christian Church it soon became the particular prayer of clergy and monks for many centuries. One of the blessings flowing from the liturgical reforms of Vatican II is the resurgence of the Divine Office among the laity. For our purposes we will refer to this form of prayer as the Work of God since that is the traditional Benedictine term.”

+Peace to your heart,
John



Hello John,

Thank you for the wonderful reply! 

I had no idea its roots could be traced back to Judaism, or that Our Lord and the Apostles would have prayed a form of it!!  That's very interesting and in a way, comforting to me, drawing one closer to Christ as He prayed.  Its amazing that its this ancient and has withstood the test of time as a form of prayer, down to present, albeit changed somewhat over the centuries! 
Your enthusiasm for it is infectious, you have me seriously thinking about praying the LOH.

Thank you so much for all the information!

Pax,
Sandy

Flag Barzillai April 11, 2008 11:00 AM EDT

Shaner wrote:

Hello John,

Thank you for the wonderful reply!

I had no idea its roots could be traced back to Judaism, or that Our Lord and the Apostles would have prayed a form of it!! That's very interesting and in a way, comforting to me, drawing one closer to Christ as He prayed. Its amazing that its this ancient and has withstood the test of time as a form of prayer, down to present, albeit changed somewhat over the centuries!
Your enthusiasm for it is infectious, you have me seriously thinking about praying the LOH.

Thank you so much for all the information!

Pax,
Sandy




Hi Sandy,

Thank you!

If you like a deeper spirituality, you are right that the LOH is often what draws people.

I think there is a mystery or something special that makes the Psalms a flowing spring for the Holy Spirit’s power.

From the Human Ancestors of Jesus. The personal accounts of the struggles and unbending faith of those in the human lineage of Jesus (the Jewish authors of the Psalms) makes it easier for us to feel a comforting kinship with these most ancient songs to God.

Jesus Christ came in fulfillment of the prayers and songs of the people who wrote and sang the Psalms, and they were the human ancestors of Jesus. These are the Songs that Paul tells us to sing. These were the songs Jesus loved. Jesus’s IPod had all 150 Psalms!

Before the Divisions. The use of the Psalms in daily song and prayer has continued in an unbroken chain of tradition from the days of antiquity before any division between Jews and Christians. Catholics, of course, but also Protestants can quickly feel an affinity with the various forms of the LOH (St. Benedict's, for example) that were developed about 1,000 years prior to Martin Luther’s publication of his Ninety-five Theses in 1517 which led to the Reformation and a split in Christianity.

For major parts of the LOH, the texts for the LOH are taken from times when those who acknowledged God’s sovereignty were in greatest unity.

The close human connection of the authors of the Psalms to Jesus the man and the core of the LOH being taken from sources treasured by Catholics, Protestants, and Jews as a common religious tradition fills the LOH with spiritual depth and power.

[SIZE=2]Or, stated differently, a source for drawing closer to God that has been used, treasured, tested, survived all attempts to stamp it out, and that comforted Jewish prophets, the 12 apostles, and heros and saints of the Catholic church, and Jesus as he prayed alone at night to God, and whose core texts date back some 3,000 years, might still have some use today! :)
[/SIZE]

Flag Barzillai April 11, 2008 9:25 PM EDT
When the Spirit moves, it can be felt everywhere as this blog article from a charismatic Christian attests. The blog also includes an article on monasticism from Christianity Today Magazine giving a good overview of the influences in the past 20 years.

Blog Article on Monastic Practices :)
Flag Mysty101 April 12, 2008 6:46 AM EDT
[QUOTE=Shaner;424938]  Your enthusiasm for it is infectious, you have me seriously thinking about praying the LOH. [/QUOTE]

Hi Sandy,

It would be a great benefit and comfort  for you to pray the hours.  When you start (notice I said when ;) ) remember you are under no obligation to pray them, so even one section of one day (usually about 15-20 min) is better than nothiong.  I pray morning prayer far more often than the other hours, but I do try to check the non-biblical reading from the office.  ([COLOR="RoyalBlue"]bottom of this page[/COLOR])  These wonderful writings are seldom heard (unless your priest uses them for homilies at daily Mass :D )

SuZ
Flag Mysty101 April 12, 2008 6:49 AM EDT
Br John & John,

Thanks for all the info & links.  I do appreciate all your posts. We can tell from the number of views that many people are reading, and some may begin praying the hours!!

Love & Prayers,

SuZ
Flag Shaner April 12, 2008 10:05 AM EDT

Barzillai wrote:

Hi Sandy,

Thank you!

If you like a deeper spirituality, you are right that the LOH is often what draws people.

I think there is a mystery or something special that makes the Psalms a flowing spring for the Holy Spirit’s power.

From the Human Ancestors of Jesus. The personal accounts of the struggles and unbending faith of those in the human lineage of Jesus (the Jewish authors of the Psalms) makes it easier for us to feel a comforting kinship with these most ancient songs to God.

Jesus Christ came in fulfillment of the prayers and songs of the people who wrote and sang the Psalms, and they were the human ancestors of Jesus. These are the Songs that Paul tells us to sing. These were the songs Jesus loved. Jesus’s IPod had all 150 Psalms!

Before the Divisions. The use of the Psalms in daily song and prayer has continued in an unbroken chain of tradition from the days of antiquity before any division between Jews and Christians. Catholics, of course, but also Protestants can quickly feel an affinity with the various forms of the LOH (St. Benedict's, for example) that were developed about 1,000 years prior to Martin Luther’s publication of his Ninety-five Theses in 1517 which led to the Reformation and a split in Christianity.

For major parts of the LOH, the texts for the LOH are taken from times when those who acknowledged God’s sovereignty were in greatest unity.

The close human connection of the authors of the Psalms to Jesus the man and the core of the LOH being taken from sources treasured by Catholics, Protestants, and Jews as a common religious tradition fills the LOH with spiritual depth and power.

[SIZE=2]Or, stated differently, a source for drawing closer to God that has been used, treasured, tested, survived all attempts to stamp it out, and that comforted Jewish prophets, the 12 apostles, and heros and saints of the Catholic church, and Jesus as he prayed alone at night to God, and whose core texts date back some 3,000 years, might still have some use today! :)
[/SIZE]


Great post John, you're very informed about the history of and behind the LOH!  Thanks for the information,

Peace,
Sandy

Flag Shaner April 12, 2008 10:23 AM EDT

Mysty101 wrote:

Hi Sandy,

It would be a great benefit and comfort for you to pray the hours. When you start (notice I said when ;) ) remember you are under no obligation to pray them, so even one section of one day (usually about 15-20 min) is better than nothiong. I pray morning prayer far more often than the other hours, but I do try to check the non-biblical reading from the office. (bottom of this page) These wonderful writings are seldom heard (unless your priest uses them for homilies at daily Mass :D )

SuZ



Hi Sue,
aka Happy Grandma!

I get your not-so-subtle hint, lol.  Yes, I've decided to start praying them  and I thank you all for the information, links, etc.!  You've all been a great help to me,

Hugs,
Sandy

Flag Barzillai April 12, 2008 10:43 AM EDT
I admire people who were raised Catholic. ;) But most often it is not for the reasons you might think.

As a former atheist for 37 years, and an evangelical for a good long while, and now nearly a Catholic, my lack of knowledge about the definitions of the words used by Catholics — and so many of them are in Latin — is a real hindrance. People who were raised Catholic already know the definitions.

I thought if there are any former atheists, former Protestants, who might be unsure of what "Liturgy of the Hours" means. The following might help.

Liturgy of the Hours means certain prayers to be recited at fixed hours of the day or night.


[SIZE=2]The Liturgy of the Hours is also called the Divine Office, or the Opus Dei (see, I knew Latin would pop up here) which means "Work of God."[/SIZE]

The above is the summary, read on only if you want more detail.

Liturgy comes from a Greek word for public duty a citizen performed for the state. As taken over in the Catholic church, liturgy means a public official ceremony in the Church.

So Liturgy is, in general, the public church ceremonies.

The term "Hours" refers to the idea that we praise God throughout the day. For example, "the custom of reciting prayers at certain hours of the day or night goes back to the Jews, from whom Christians have borrowed it. In the Psalms we find expressions like: "I will meditate on thee in the morning"; "I rose at midnight to give praise to thee"; "Evening and morning, and at noon I will speak and declare: and he shall hear my voice"; "Seven times a day I have given praise to thee""

From the New Testament we are reminded to pray without ceasing.

By praying at certain times of the day we are reminded that all of our time is consecrated to God and in those times we find a deeper connection to God.

For many people who pray the LOH, after giving you the basic facts, outlined above, they would also tell you that the LOH is a source of deep spirituality. There is often times of silence and quiet contemplation during or after the LOH.

And for those who wonder what is special about the particular forms and content of the Divine Office (LOH), there is a brief overview of the antiquity of this practice that can trace its roots back nearly 3,000 years, here -- which is link to my previous post on the antiguity of the LOH.

But everyone’s spiritual life is different, not all lay Catholics pray the LOH, and fewer non-Catholics do, so do not think that the LOH is a necessary element of finding and knowing God, it is not. Your path may lead in a different way and that’s OK. :)

Quotes in the above were taken from the Catholic Encyclopedia.

Good Advice About Praying the LOH.


Brother John (another Beliefnet member) gave good advice on how to pray the LOH. His post is number 7 in this thread, but since there have been several other posts since then, it might help if it is reposted here too:


All the following is from Brother John
"Hey Pio,

I used to think that I had such a busy life that I didn't have time to pray, however, as others have suggested, you can adapt the LOH to modern day life. You have to remember that the LOH and others like it, were originally intended for life in the monastic communities not the home and work of the secular life. I'm sure if you checked out your local religious book store that you would find many books on "home prayers."



I know that working people find it difficult to set aside time, but could I be so bold as to make a couple of suggestions? You and I are friends so I know you will take it in the spirit intended.

Get out of bed a little earlier and pray ... you'll be pleasantly surprised how much of a difference this one little jesture will make in your day. Pray while driving your car (but keep your eyes on the road.) During lunch break ... some people have an hour, some 1/2 hour. If you have the longer version of lunch .. take 15 minutes to pray ... shorter version ... pray while eating! God doesn't care ... just pray. Evening ... (and you know what's coming) a little less time with EWTN and some time in prayer .. LOL.

It has been my personal experience that no matter how busy one's life is .. there is always time for prayer if you only look for it.

Blessings

Br. John

P.S. EWTN is my favourite channel and sometimes I just can't tear myself away."
Flag Barzillai April 14, 2008 9:05 PM EDT
Few lay people pray the Liturgy of the Hours, but more are learning about and beoming interested in this ancient practice.  Here is a map where people who pray the LOH can enter their location on a map --- kinda cool!:)

Map for Liturgy of the Hours
Flag Barzillai April 14, 2008 9:20 PM EDT
Originally the Liturgy of the Hours was what all Christians viewed as a way they could pray throughout the day --- it was not just for priests, sisters, nuns.  It was the daily prayer of the regular Christian as well.  Of course, not everyone could or did pray all of the Hours --- due to their work and family duties.  Over time the LOH was prayed more and more by the priests, sisters, nuns, and monks.

That is changing today, we are coming full circle, when the LOH is viewed as a form of prayer that regular Christians can also pray as their lifestyles and duties allow. If you explore the LOH, don't create an extra burden in your life.  Do what is comfortable.

+Peace,

John
Flag Barzillai April 14, 2008 11:34 PM EDT
The Liturgy of the Hours

1174 The mystery of Christ, his Incarnation and Passover, which we celebrate in the Eucharist especially at the Sunday assembly, permeates and transfigures the time of each day, through the celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours, "the divine office."46 This celebration, faithful to the apostolic exhortations to "pray constantly," is "so devised that the whole course of the day and night is made holy by the praise of God."47 In this "public prayer of the Church,"48 the faithful (clergy, religious, and lay people) exercise the royal priesthood of the baptized. Celebrated in "the form approved" by the Church, the Liturgy of the Hours "is truly the voice of the Bride herself addressed to her Bridegroom. It is the very prayer which Christ himself together with his Body addresses to the Father.49

1175 The Liturgy of the Hours is intended to become the prayer of the whole People of God. In it Christ himself "continues his priestly work through his Church."50 His members participate according to their own place in the Church and the circumstances of their lives: priests devoted to the pastoral ministry, because they are called to remain diligent in prayer and the service of the word; religious, by the charism of their consecrated lives; all the faithful as much as possible: "Pastors of souls should see to it that the principal hours, especially Vespers, are celebrated in common in church on Sundays and on the more solemn feasts. The laity, too, are encouraged to recite the divine office, either with the priests, or among themselves, or even individually."51

1176 The celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours demands not only harmonizing the voice with the praying heart, but also a deeper "understanding of the liturgy and of the Bible, especially of the Psalms."52

1177 The hymns and litanies of the Liturgy of the Hours integrate the prayer of the psalms into the age of the Church, expressing the symbolism of the time of day, the liturgical season, or the feast being celebrated. Moreover, the reading from the Word of God at each Hour (with the subsequent responses or troparia) and readings from the Fathers and spiritual masters at certain Hours, reveal more deeply the meaning of the mystery being celebrated, assist in understanding the psalms, and prepare for silent prayer. The lectio divina, where the Word of God is so read and meditated that it becomes prayer, is thus rooted in the liturgical celebration.

1178 The Liturgy of the Hours, which is like an extension of the Eucharistic celebration, does not exclude but rather in a complementary way calls forth the various devotions of the People of God, especially adoration and worship of the Blessed Sacrament.



All of the above is a quote from

CATECHISM OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Flag Barzillai April 16, 2008 9:06 PM EDT
I was drawn to the Liturgy of the Hours because it was one way to practice what the early Christians practiced.
Flag Mysty101 April 17, 2008 7:06 AM EDT
Hi John,

Thanks so much for all the info. (sorry I've not been around much---work & new baby) It's been a while, and I don't even remember how I became aware of the hours, but I think I started praying because I wanted to unite my personal prayer with the formal prayer of priests & religious.

I do like the idea of uniting prayer with others.  We started praying the Novena to the Sacred Heart on Friday after the 9:00 am Mass, and I have invited hundreds of people to join us, both on line, and in person.  At the hospital I sometimes give the prayer card to patients, and write "Friday 9:30 am" on the back, and invite them to join us.

SuZ
Flag Barzillai April 18, 2008 2:19 PM EDT
I am joking of course. :)

The suggestion of propaganda alone (in the good sense) is the subject of one of many excellent blogs on liturgy by Derek the Anglican at Haligweorc Blog.

The blog is actually a call for papers. If you have the time to join in this project, I know Derek would appreciate any input. And having his blog link allows you to follow the progress of this super project which will, in itself, be good press for the Liturgy of the Hours.
Flag Everett_Marx April 20, 2008 2:50 PM EDT
I was introduced to this while in seminary and kept the 'habit' despite leaving seminary. The first thing I reach for in the morning is the Breviary (-I have the 4-volume set) and it's the last thing I read before falling asleep.

I never *thought* it would mean so much to me, but now I loathe the thought of life without it!
Flag Mysty101 April 22, 2008 5:16 AM EDT
Hi Everett,

And welcome to the forum.  I read your profile, and wonder if there is anything you would care to discuss. 

Perhaps start another thread if the topic is not LOTH.

I wish I could get into the habit of praying the hours more faithfully. 

SuZ
Flag Barzillai April 24, 2008 10:56 PM EDT
B16 said the following during a meeting with representatives of other religions at the "Rotunda" Hall of the Pope John Paul II Cultural Center of Washington. Full statement is here.

"There is a further point I wish to touch upon here. I have noticed a growing interest among governments to sponsor programs intended to promote interreligious and intercultural dialogue. These are praiseworthy initiatives. At the same time, religious freedom, interreligious dialogue and faith-based education aim at something more than a consensus regarding ways to implement practical strategies for advancing peace. The broader purpose of dialogue is to discover the truth. What is the origin and destiny of mankind? What are good and evil? What awaits us at the end of our earthly existence? Only by addressing these deeper questions can we build a solid basis for the peace and security of the human family, for "wherever and whenever men and women are enlightened by the splendor of truth, they naturally set out on the path of peace" (Message for the 2006 World Day of Peace, 3)."

"We are living in an age when these questions are too often marginalized. Yet they can never be erased from the human heart. Throughout history, men and women have striven to articulate their restlessness with this passing world. In the Judeo-Christian tradition, the Psalms are full of such expressions: "My spirit is overwhelmed within me" (Ps 143:4; cf. Ps 6:6; 31:10; 32:3; 38:8; 77:3); "why are you cast down, my soul, why groan within me?" (Ps 42:5). The response is always one of faith: "Hope in God, I will praise him still; my Savior and my God" (Ps 42:5, 11; cf. Ps 43:5; 62:5). Spiritual leaders have a special duty, and we might say competence, to place the deeper questions at the forefront of human consciousness, to reawaken mankind to the mystery of human existence, and to make space in a frenetic world for reflection and prayer."

The Liturgy of the Hours is an ancient way to consecrate our time and pray from the Psalms.
Flag rubypoet April 25, 2008 1:44 PM EDT
[QUOTE=Mysty101;419618]Hi Br John,

Yes, prayer is so important, and so helpful to us.

A friend spoke of a conversation with a vocations director, who had the sad job of interviewing priests and seminarians who were leaving. 

One question was "when did you stop praying the hours?"

No one ever responded that they hadn't stopped.

SuZ[/QUOTE]

Isn't that sad, it rather makes one think that if they'd kept up their prayers, they might not be in that position, that crisis of faith.  I'm going to log onto your thread about the prayer of the hours, thank you very much!
Flag Mysty101 April 26, 2008 10:45 PM EDT
Hi Ruby,

And welcome to the Cloisters.

We're here, if you wish to discuss anything.

SuZ
Flag Barzillai April 28, 2008 9:11 PM EDT
Everett,

I do not have the 4 volume Roman Beviary, but I know that it is very popular. I use "Benedictine Daily Prayer." 

What does everyone else use?
Flag Mysty101 May 11, 2008 6:30 AM EDT
Hi Adam,

And welcome to this forum.  I see that you are a young convert. It is wonderful to see such Faith and perservence---it couldn't have been easy.

Whatever hours you are able to pray is pleasing to God.

God bless you in your journey.

SuZ
Flag Mysty101 May 11, 2008 6:31 AM EDT
Hi John,

I use the 1 volume Christian Prayer, and supplement  with the office readings on-line.

SuZ
Flag Mysty101 May 25, 2008 2:55 AM EDT
Hi Altar Server,

And welcome to the forum. 

Yes, I am also able to pray more in the summer.

SuZ
Flag St.Gemma'sFriend May 28, 2008 6:44 PM EDT
Have you tried the Divine Office of the Virgin Mary (or is it the little office if the Virgin Mary)?  It has TONS of short little prayers for each day and each part of the day.  I think God would prefer just a quiet conversation anyway.  Oh, and welcome home!  Mum and I converted a few years ago and it's wonderful being a new catholic.  Whenever someone is descerning a vocation the nuns always say to keep working because work is prayer in itself.  That's the truth!

God bless you in your life-long conversion!
Hugs, prayers and love,
Your sister in Christ,
Tay
Flag Mysty101 May 29, 2008 5:33 AM EDT
Hi Tay,

Welcome to this forum, and more importantly to the Catholic Faith.

I am a cradle Catholic, and often wonder how it would be to "find" the church after the age of reason.

I am not familiar with the Office of the Blessed Mother.  Is it a single book?

SuZ
Flag Barzillai August 2, 2008 10:28 PM EDT
I watch this thread regularly and I thought I would write this post to see if there are any other people who are interested in the Liturgy of the Hours, also called the Divine Office (link is to an example for those who may not know what it is).

+Peace

John
Flag Mysty101 August 6, 2008 1:41 PM EDT
Hi John,

Sorry that I haven't been around much lately----I need knee surgery for a torn maniscus, had some female problems, and a nasty case of poison ivy, plus I work part time, and babysit a bit with my grandchildren-- an infant & a three yo. 

I try to pray the hours, but cannot get to it every time.  I pray morning prayer much more often than the other hours.  Our local cable prayer channel prays the lauds at 9:00am, & vespers at 6:00 pm.  I do prefer to pray in community.  Also one local parish prays the psalms of morning prayer at the beginning of the 9:00 am Mass.

How are you?

SuZ
Flag Barzillai August 10, 2008 11:45 AM EDT
Misty,

Wow, you do have a full schedule. I know how other things seem to replace time we would prefer to spend praying the liturgy of the hours — but we just do the best we can.

I have had a wonderful summer and have been studying and thinking about how the liturgy of the hours affects/relates to/helps our lives. In fact, that was one of the reasons I check this forum — to see what BeliefNet members might be saying about their life in the liturgy of the hours.

I use the book Benedictine Daily Prayer with some additional card-stock tabs I made — today I am going to make some new ones.:)
Flag Barzillai February 5, 2009 11:50 PM EST
Thanks to a friend’s reminder, I wanted to make sure you know about the "Major Religious Orders of Men" a new EWTN series by Father Charles Connor. The first episode was on the history of early Eastern Monasticism, it aired this week. Those interested in the LOH often like monastic history as well -- hence this post.

The next times for the show on the Eternal Word Television Network (EWTN) are:

US Eastern Time:

Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2009 at 11:30 pm
Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2009 at 11:30 pm
Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2009 at 4:00 am
Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2009 at 11:30 pm
Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2009 at 4:00 am

The second episode will be a continuation of the history of monasticism in the East and its effect on the development of monasticism in the West.

I liked the first episode. The show gave a fine introduction to the history of monasticism.

I liked Father Connor’s statements about the ascetic and consecrated life being a part of the Church from the first century. Connor said that what was new at the beginning of the fourth century was not the monastic life, but the adaptation of the monastic life to the world in which the Christians were then living when the persecutions ended (from about 305 to 313 AD). The monks and hermits were trying to preserve intact the ideal of the Christian life as it had been lived from the very beginning.
Flag Mysty101 February 7, 2009 12:22 AM EST
Hi John,

Good to see you.

Thanks for letting us know about this series.  I look forward to your thoughts.

SuZ
Flag Thomas A Quinas April 1, 2013 3:58 PM EDT

Te Deum laudámus!



A rather chipper rendition apropos for the High Season.  Happy Easter Octave everyone!Smile



Flag Thomas A Quinas April 2, 2013 6:42 PM EDT

De nuptiis Agni:



One of my favorite songs in Vespers (... Latin/English translation can be viewed scrolling halfway down ...)

Flag Thomas A Quinas April 4, 2013 8:33 PM EDT

A 3yr-old recording of vespers is made accessible in the youtube embeds, with additional links to parts 3 & 4 underneath the embeds.  The last chance to include the antiphons of the Octave this year is tomorrow evening (4/5/13).  The office is prayed with the breviary in accordance with the missal of Pope John XXIII, available here.  The only difference would be the antiphon to the Magnificat, which changes with the gospel readings on various days in the Octave.  The recording is absolutely superb!

Flag Thomas A Quinas April 5, 2013 6:17 PM EDT

There's also a beautiful youtube video of Compline sung by Benedictine nuns:



One can go strait to Compline at 9:39 into the video.  There are some minor differences in the way they sang Compline & the way it would be sung now, partly owing to customs peculiar to the Benedictine Order and partly owing to the Easter Octave.  In the video, the Pater Noster isn't prayed prior to the Confiteor, but just prior to the Oratio near the end, and right after the Kyrie, which is preceded by the brief responsory that usually follows the Canticle of Simeon.  Also, we sing the Regina Caeli instead of the Salve Regina due to the High Season.  Nevertheless, a beautiful recording, the differences easily smoothed over with a little bit of ingenuity. 

Flag Thomas A Quinas April 9, 2013 5:40 PM EDT

Another variation of one of the songs preceding compline in the previous video:



Salve Mater misericordiae, Mater Dei et Mater veniae, Mater spei et Mater gratiae, Mater plena Sanctae Letitiae,
O Maria!
Salve decus humani generis. Salve Virgo dignior ceteris, quae virgines omnes transgrederis et altius sedes in superis. O Maria!
Salve Mater...
Salve felix Virgo puerpera: Nam qui sedet in Patris dextera, Caelum regens, terram et aethera, Intra tua se clasit viscera. O Maria!
Salve Mater...
Esto, Mater, nostrum solatium: Nostrum esto, tu Virgo, guadium, et nos tandem post hoc exsilium, Laetos juge choris caelestium. O Maria!
Salve Mater...

Hail mother of mercy, mother of God and mother of pardon, mother of hope and mother of grace, mother full of holy gladness. O Mary!
Hail, honor of the mankind. Hail worthier Virgin than the other ones because you overcome all of them and in the heaven you occupy the highest seat of honor. O Mary!
Hail mother...
Hail Blest Virgin yet bearing child: For he who sits at the Father's right hand. The ruler of heaven, of earth and sky, has sheltered Himself in your womb. O Mary!
Hail mother...
Become, O mother, our solace: Be for us our source of joy, and at the last, after this exile, unite us rejoicing to the choir of angels. O Mary!
Hail mother...

A somewhat higher scale, but here's the sheetmusic for the nun's version. (... translation ...)

Flag Thomas A Quinas August 31, 2015 8:19 AM EDT
Preces Feriales{Ad Laudes matutinasFERIA SECUNDA, Hebd. XXII @almudi.org}
Weekday Intercessions{Morning Prayer for Monday in the 22nd week of Ordinary Time@DivineOffice.org}


Salvátor noster fecit nos regnum et sacerdótium, ut hóstias Deo acceptábiles offerámus. Grati ígitur eum invocémus: Serva nos in tuo ministério, Dómine.



Christe, sacérdos ætérne, qui sanctum pópulo tuo sacerdótium concessísti,
concéde, ut spiritáles hóstias Deo acceptábiles iúgiter offerámus.               Serva nos in tuo ministério, Dómine.


Spíritus tui fructus nobis largíre propítius,
patiéntiam, benignitátem et mansuetúdinem.                                    Serva nos in tuo ministério, Dómine.


Da nobis te amáre, ut te, qui es cáritas, possideámus,
et bene ágere, ut per vitam étiam nostram te laudémus.                                         Serva nos in tuo ministério, Dómine.


Quæ frátribus nostris sunt utília, nos quærere concéde,
ut salútem facílius consequántur.          Serva nos in tuo ministério, Dómine.





Our Savior has made us a nation of priests to offer acceptable sacrifice to the Father. Let us call upon him in gratitude:
Preserve us in your ministry, Lord.



Christ, eternal priest, you conferred the holy priesthood on your people,
— grant that we may offer spiritual sacrifices acceptable to the Father.
Preserve us in your ministry, Lord.




In your goodness pour out on us the fruits of your Spirit,
— patience, kindness and gentleness.
Preserve us in your ministry, Lord.




May we love you and possess you, for you are love,
— and may every action of our lives praise you.
Preserve us in your ministry, Lord.



May we seek those things which are beneficial to our brothers,
— without counting the cost, to help them on the way to salvation.
Preserve us in your ministry, Lord.



Sancte Raymundi Nonnati,


Ora pro nobis!

Flag Thomas A Quinas September 2, 2015 8:48 AM EDT

Morning offering (September 2, 1015):


Preces Feriales{Ad Laudes matutinas, FERIA QUARTA, Hebd. XXII} ...



Benedíctus Deus salvátor noster, qui usque ad consummatiónem sæculi se ómnibus diébus cum Ecclésia sua mansúrum promísit. Ideo ei grátias agéntes clamémus: Mane nobíscum, Dómine.




Mane nobíscum, Dómine, toto die,
numquam declínet a nobis sol grátiæ tuæ.   Mane nobíscum, Dómine.


Hunc diem tibi tamquam oblatiónem consecrámus,
dum nos nihil pravi factúros aut probatúros pollicémur.                                             Mane nobíscum, Dómine.


Fac, Dómine, ut donum lucis hic totus dies evádat,
ut simus sal terræ et lux mundi.           Mane nobíscum, Dómine.


Spíritus Sancti tui cáritas dírigat corda et lábia nostra,
ut in tua iustítia semper et laude maneámus.                                           Mane nobíscum, Dómine.





Weekday Intercessions{Morning Prayer for Wednesday in the 22nd week of Ordinary Time} ...



Blessed be God our Savior, who promised to remain with his Church all days, until the end of the world. Let us give him thanks and call out:
Remain with us, Lord.



Remain with us the whole day, Lord,
— let your grace be a sun that never sets.
Remain with us, Lord.



We dedicate this day to you as an offering,
— do not let us offer anything that is evil.
Remain with us, Lord.



May your gift of light pervade this whole day,
— that we may be the salt of the earth and the light of the world.
Remain with us, Lord.



May the love of your Holy Spirit direct our hearts and our lips,
— and may we always act in accordance with your will.
Remain with us, Lord.



Oratio {ex Proprio Sanctorum} 
V. Dómine, exáudi oratiónem meam.
R. Et clamor meus ad te véniat.
Orémus
Concede, quaesumus, Ecclesiae tuae, omnipotens Deus: ut beatum Stephanum Confessorem tuum, quem regnantem in terris propagatorem habuit, propugnatorem habere mereatur gloriosum in caelis.
Per Dóminum nostrum Iesum Christum, Filium tuum: qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti Deus, per ómnia sǽcula sæculórum.
R. Amen.



Prayer {from the Proper of Saints} 
V. O Lord, hear my prayer.
R. And let my cry come unto thee.
Let us pray.
Grant unto thy Church, we beseech thee, O Almighty God, that even as thy blessed Confessor Stephen, while he was a King upon earth, was her forwarder, so, now that he is a glorious Saint in heaven, he may be her defender.
Through Jesus Christ, thy Son our Lord, Who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, ever one God, world without end.
R. Amen.
Flag Thomas A Quinas September 3, 2015 7:10 AM EDT

Morning offering (September 3, 1015):

Preces de Communi pastorum.


Christo, bono pastóri, qui pro suis óvibus ánimam pósuit, laudes grati exsolvámus et supplicémus, dicéntes: Pasce pópulum tuum, Dómine.



Christe, qui in sanctis pastóribus misericórdiam et dilectiónem tuam dignátus es osténdere,
numquam désinas per eos nobíscum misericórditer ágere.   Pasce pópulum tuum, Dómine.


Qui múnere pastóris animárum fungi per tuos vicários pergis,
ne destíteris nos ipse per rectóres nostros dirígere.   Pasce pópulum tuum, Dómine.


Qui in sanctis tuis, populórum dúcibus, córporum animarúmque médicus exstitísti,
numquam cesses ministérium in nos vitæ et sanctitátis perágere.   Pasce pópulum tuum, Dómine.


Qui, prudéntia et caritáte sanctórum, tuum gregem erudísti,
nos in sanctitáte iúgiter per pastóres nostros ædífica.   Pasce pópulum tuum, Dómine.



Intercessions from the common of pastors (Sep 03, Morning Prayer)...


Christ is the Good Shepherd who laid down his life for his sheep. Let us praise and thank him as we pray:
Nourish your people, Lord.


Christ, you decided to show your merciful love through your holy shepherds,
— let your mercy always reach us through them.
Nourish your people, Lord.


Through your vicars you continue to perform the ministry of shepherd of souls,
— direct us always through our leaders.
Nourish your people, Lord.


Through your holy ones, the leaders of your people, you served as physician of our bodies and our spirits,
— continue to fulfill your ministry of life and holiness in us.
Nourish your people, Lord.


You taught your flock through the prudence and love of your saints,
— grant us continual growth in holiness under the direction of our pastors.
Nourish your people, Lord.


Sancte Gregorii Papæ Confessoris,


Ora pro nobis!


Sancte Pii X Papae,


Ora pro nobis!
Flag Thomas A Quinas September 19, 2015 2:40 PM EDT

This is a rather upbeat rendition of Psalm 147, verses 12-20 (typically the 2nd psalm of 1st Vespers for common feasts of the Blessed Virgin Mary) by one of my favorite composers.


Flag Thomas A Quinas September 20, 2015 3:20 PM EDT

In the book, "The Musical Shape of the Liturgy" (by William Peter Mahrt, © 2012 Church Music Association of America), there's an adequate section on Antonio Vivaldi (starting on p. 333), but I'll only quote a paragraph on p. 340 that seems relevant to the score of the previous post:


Aside from the three movements of the Mass, Vivaldi’s compositions on liturgical texts generally belong to the office of vespers. This was, in fact, an important and well-attended public service in his time. The standardization of the order of the liturgy which followed the Council of Trent provided composers the assurance of universal suitability for their pieces, and there followed during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries a large number of publications of settings for vespers. The solemn singing of vespers on Sundays and feast days came to be an elaborate affair, and it was not uncommon for this single service to last for two or three hours in churches where such music was especially cultivated. But the question remains, were Vivaldi’s pieces written for such services?


The embed is avialable here (www.chantcafe.com/2012/01/great-work-is-...) or below ...


  The Musical Shape of the Liturgy


As a footnote I love Vivaldi's compositions, both liturgical & secular.  His "Four Seasons" compilation is available for listening at EMH Classical Music, and when my "contentment" is too contingent on external stimuli (which is far too often ;-) ), I find his pieces most conducive to relaxation and an even keel.

Flag Thomas A Quinas September 25, 2015 4:41 AM EDT

Antiphon + Benedictus Hymn for Amber Friday (September 2015):


www.almudi.org/images/Portals/0/docs/Bre...  (The QuickTime plug-in is disabled on some browsers.)


Canticum: Benedictus {Antiphona ex Proprio de Tempore} 
Ant. Mulier * quae erat in civitate peccatrix, stans retro secus pedes Domini, lacrimis coepit rigare pedes eius, et capillis capitis sui tergebat, et deosculabatur pedes eius et unguento ungebat.
(Canticum Zachariae: Luc. 1:68-79)
1:68 Benedictus  Dóminus, Deus Israël: * quia visitávit, et fecit redemptiónem plebis suæ:
1:69 Et eréxit cornu salútis nobis: * in domo David, púeri sui.
1:70 Sicut locútus est per os sanctórum, * qui a sǽculo sunt, prophetárum eius:
1:71 Salútem ex inimícis nostris, * et de manu ómnium, qui odérunt nos.
1:72 Ad faciéndam misericórdiam cum pátribus nostris: * et memorári testaménti sui sancti.
1:73 Iusiurándum, quod iurávit ad Ábraham patrem nostrum, * datúrum se nobis:
1:74 Ut sine timóre, de manu inimicórum nostrórum liberáti, * serviámus illi.
1:75 In sanctitáte, et iustítia coram ipso, * ómnibus diébus nostris.
1:76 Et tu, puer, Prophéta Altíssimi vocáberis: * præíbis enim ante fáciem Dómini, paráre vias eius:
1:77 Ad dandam sciéntiam salútis plebi eius: * in remissiónem peccatórum eórum:
1:78 Per víscera misericórdiæ Dei nostri: * in quibus visitávit nos, óriens ex alto:
1:79 Illumináre his, qui in ténebris, et in umbra mortis sedent: * ad dirigéndos pedes nostros in viam pacis.
V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, * et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, * et in sǽcula sæculórum. Amen.
Ant. Mulier * quae erat in civitate peccatrix, stans retro secus pedes Domini, lacrimis coepit rigare pedes eius, et capillis capitis sui tergebat, et deosculabatur pedes eius et unguento ungebat.

Canticum: Benedictus {Antiphona from the Proper of the season} 

Ant. A woman in the city which was a sinner stood at the Lord's Feet behind Him, * and began to wash His Feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed His Feet, and anointed them with the ointment.
(Canticle of Zacharias: Luke 1:68-79)
1:68 Blessed be the Lord  God of Israel; * because he hath visited and wrought the redemption of his people:
1:69 And hath raised up an horn of salvation to us, * in the house of David his servant:
1:70 As he spoke by the mouth of his holy Prophets, * who are from the beginning:
1:71 Salvation from our enemies, * and from the hand of all that hate us:
1:72 To perform mercy to our fathers, * and to remember his holy testament,
1:73 The oath, which he swore to Abraham our father, * that he would grant to us,
1:74 That being delivered from the hand of our enemies, * we may serve him without fear,
1:75 In holiness and justice before him, * all our days.
1:76 And thou, child, shalt be called the prophet of the Highest: * for thou shalt go before the face of the Lord to prepare his ways:
1:77 To give knowledge of salvation to his people, * unto the remission of their sins:
1:78 Through the bowels of the mercy of our God, * in which the Orient from on high hath visited us:
1:79 To enlighten them that sit in darkness, and in the shadow of death: * to direct our feet into the way of peace.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost. 
R. As it was in the beginning, is now, * and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
Ant. A woman in the city which was a sinner stood at the Lord's Feet behind Him, * and began to wash His Feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed His Feet, and anointed them with the ointment.

Sancta Maria Magdalena,


Ora Pro Nobis!


Mary Magdalene missal photo

Flag Thomas A Quinas October 4, 2015 7:45 AM EDT

Hymn for Sunday Lauds odd week (Ætérne rerum cónditor):



Be forewarned that, although the Latin/English translation is contained in the hyperlink above, "The numbering of the verses skips from 4 to 7 due to two other verses which the Liber Hymnarius leaves out, but which were included in Britt."  So after the 4th stanza, you have to scroll down for stanzas 5 & 6, then scroll back up for 7.  You may also notice that the RSS feed (i.e., "Canamus Blog Roll") contains posts from a blog titled "What Does the Prayer Really Say?", which goes into excruciating detail as to the English translations of the Latin collects contained in the ICEL for the Pope Paul VI ordo masses (... the original Latin collects are mostly the same, just switched around for different weeks of the calendar year).


Flag Thomas A Quinas October 17, 2015 12:06 PM EDT

From the 1st reading today (Office of Readings; Malachi 3:3-4):


For he is like the refiner’s fire, or like the fuller’s lye. He will sit refining and purifying [silver], and he will purify the sons of Levi, Refining them like gold or like silver that they may offer due sacrifice to the Lord. Then the sacrifice of Judah and Jerusalem will please the Lord, as in days of old, as in years gone by.


Handel - Mesias - And he shall purify - Clare College Choir:



Pray for priests!!

Flag Thomas A Quinas October 30, 2015 7:45 AM EDT

Morning offering:


Preces Feriales{FERIA SEXTA, Hebd. XXX: Ad Laudes matutinas}



Christum, qui sánguine suo per Spíritum Sanctum semetípsum óbtulit Patri ad emundándam consciéntiam nostram ab opéribus mórtuis, adorémus et sincéro corde profiteámur:In tua voluntáte pax nostra, Dómine.





Diéi exórdium a tua benignitáte suscépimus,
nobis páriter vitæ novæ concéde inítium. In tua voluntáte pax nostra, Dómine.



Qui ómnia creásti providúsque consérvas,
fac ut inspiciámus perénne tui vestígium in creátis. In tua voluntáte pax nostra, Dómine.


Qui sánguine tuo novum et ætérnum testaméntum sanxísti,
da ut, quæ præcipis faciéntes, tuo fidéles fœderi maneámus. In tua voluntáte pax nostra, Dómine.


Qui, in cruce pendens, una cum sánguine aquam de látere effudísti,
hoc salutári flúmine áblue peccáta nostra et civitátem Dei lætífica. In tua voluntáte pax nostra, Dómine.



Weekday Intercessions{Friday in the 30th week of ordinary time}



Let us adore Christ who offered himself to the Father through the Holy Spirit to cleanse us from the works of death.
Let us adore him and call upon him with sincere hearts:
In your will is our peace, Lord.



From your generosity we have received the beginning of this day,
 grant us also the beginning of new life.
In your will is our peace, Lord.



You created all things, and now you provide for their growth,
 may we always perceive your handiwork in creation.
In your will is our peace, Lord.



With your own blood, you ratified the new and eternal covenant.
 may we remain faithful to that covenant by following your precepts.
In your will is our peace, Lord.



On the cross, blood and water flowed from your side,
 may this saving stream wash away our sin and gladden the City of God.
In your will is our peace, Lord.


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