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Switch to Forum Live View UCC & "alternative beliefs"?
7 years ago  ::  Feb 02, 2008 - 10:54PM #1
lcr1130
Posts: 41
A little about me, the short version....

I was raised very strict Southern Baptist. As I grew older, for various circumstances, I became kind of spiritually dead and stagnant and cynical.... believing in generig "God" but nothing more than that.

Eventually, I decided to begin the path as a "seeker" and figure out what I really do believe. I discovered Paganism and Unitarian-Universalism, and I've also been studying Gnosticism. Over the past couple of years I've shifted from a monotheistic Pagan(in the sense that all gods/goddesses being prayed to by all people are part of the same Thing) to a polytheistic one. I also consider myself a practicing Witch.

I now am at a point where I'm trying to sort out how my previous beliefs as a Christian mesh with my some of my newfound beliefs. I find myself somewhat shifting back to my earlier state of belief... being monotheist, believing that we're all really praying to the same Being, only without the cynicism I once had. I find myself being drawn once again to Christianity and Jesus(albeit more to the Gnostic views than the traditional), yet I also feel called to continue along my nature-oriented mystical path that many would call witchcraft. I love UU(my primary beef being that oftentimes they're more social/political than spiritual), and I plan on maintaining my online affiliations thru the CLF(Church of the Larger Fellowship) no matter what, but in terms of where I actually go to brick-and-mortar churches, I'm exploring all my options based on where I am on my spiritual journey at the moment.

My question is this: based on my aforementioned views(as a Gnostic Witch/Mystic) would I be accepted in a UCC church?
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7 years ago  ::  Feb 03, 2008 - 8:25PM #2
Ancestral
Posts: 153
It really depends on the individual congregation. As a whole, the mainline denominations, especially the UCC, are far more progressive, but individual congregations can vary on a spectrum of beliefs from very progressive to moderate to "orthodox". So I would check with the pastor of your local congregation to see where they are on the spectrum. For myself, I am also a former UU. I am a Christian Universalist (I do not believe in an eternal hell) and I tend to have classical Unitarian beliefs (so I do not believe in the Trinity) and I am pretty "normal" in my congregation. Other possibilities include Disciples of Christ churches, Community of Christ, ELCA Lutheran, and Episcopal churches as well as some United Methodist and PCUSA Presbyterian churches. You also might like some of the more liberal Quaker meetings. As always check with the pastor of the congregation (or with the Clerk of a Quake meeting) to see how progressive they are.

You are also welcome to join us at the Progressive Christian community forum at:

http://community.beliefnet.com/forums/f … .php?f=146
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7 years ago  ::  Mar 04, 2008 - 4:21PM #3
DeweyCMH
Posts: 64
Well, I suspect that you'd be "accepted" to come and worship in most any of the churches that Ancestral mentioned. As to becoming a member, I'd say that you would probably have difficulty affirming that you believed the basic core tenets of faith held by the Presbyterian Church (USA) - within which I serve as a Commissioned Lay Pastor. The same would be true for the Lutheran Church, and I suspect the other denominations as well. You would definitely have difficulty making the somewhat more detailed profession of faith required of ordained members (elders, deacons, and Ministers of Word and Sacrament) within the Presbyterian Church.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 14, 2008 - 4:53PM #4
Protestant_irish
Posts: 90
I am outsider, but i have feeling more ucc are Christian and would not be pagain friendly. I bet most would believe in trinty, but i could very wrong. Sometime a go they tru to remove Jesus as Lord a group, but ucc voted against. I do not even think ucc even open to rosary, which they feel is to catholic. It sound your more untarian then ucc for most part. But i do not think they denial you at any church. I would not agree with you, but i would welcome you open arms. you are a child of God and nothing can change that for most part.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 18, 2009 - 3:13PM #5
jim.mcfarland
Posts: 3

How did it turn out?  Did you try a UCC church?  I am an ex UU, who like the UUA, but found actual UU congregations to be to social and humanist.  I am now at a UCC church and feel right at home.  I also combined neo-pagan beliefs (along with Buddism, Taosim, Hindusim, and others) with a somewhat Gnostic Christianity.  UCC churches vary, but at least for me, I found one that I feel at home in.

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5 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2009 - 9:39PM #6
lcr1130
Posts: 41

It turned out very well. I don't get to attend much anymore due to work schedule, but when I've gone, they seem very open-minded and liberal. I haven't really gone into depth in my "alternative" beliefs in conversation, but I've gotten the impression overall, they they wouldn't mind.


Would you mind divulging a bit into how you mesh all those different viewpoints together? What aspects of which religions do you practice/believe?

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5 years ago  ::  Nov 25, 2009 - 10:10AM #7
jim.mcfarland
Posts: 3

It is really very easy to mesh all my influences and sources of spirituality together.  What speaks to me as truth in each of them gives a whole that is greater than the sum of the parts.  I don't find complete truth in any existing tradition, and find flaws in all of them, but the core truth of each is in perfect sync with the others.  My version of "Christianity" makes more sense to me after studying other religions and philosophies.

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5 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2009 - 1:07AM #8
Intotheblue
Posts: 265

I think Christ would accept anyone who seeks him with a sincere heart, and therefore his followers should do the same for each other. If a church didn't accept me because they judged me as not worthy to be in their midst (as some have), I wouldn't recognize them as true followers of Christ anyway, and wouldn't want to be in their midst. That's just my view.

Namaste.

.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~

"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

"Be the change you wish to see in the world."

"It is not our differences that divide us, but our inability to accept and celebrate those differences."
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