Post Reply
Page 2 of 5  •  Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next
Switch to Forum Live View Lectio Divina Questions
7 years ago  ::  Nov 03, 2007 - 1:18AM #11
brjohnbc
Posts: 658
JP ... you've probably already seen this site ... http://www.valyermo.com/ld-art.html   (Sorry I don't know how to do the linky thing on this new forum)

It helped me a great deal when I first started the practice myself.  Hope this helps.

Blessings
Bro. John
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Nov 03, 2007 - 1:42AM #12
Merope
Posts: 9,761
[QUOTE=brjohnbc;41906]JP ... you've probably already seen this site ... http://www.valyermo.com/ld-art.html   (Sorry I don't know how to do the linky thing on this new forum)

It helped me a great deal when I first started the practice myself.  Hope this helps.

Blessings
Bro. John[/QUOTE]

[COLOR="Navy"]Yikes!  Bro. John and JP -

Luke Dysinger is the man!  He's the Benedictine I mentioned in an earlier post.  I heard him speak about lectio at a retreat I attended some years ago.  [/COLOR]
Merope | Beliefnet Community Manager
Problems? Send a message to Beliefnet_community
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Nov 03, 2007 - 10:02AM #13
maplewood
Posts: 4,511
[QUOTE=splendid;41870]How do you pronounce that?:)[/QUOTE]


Slendid:  lol!

Well, if I'd of spelled it right in the first place, it'd be easier. 

Domine, ut videam.

Doe-me-nay, oot vid-ay-ahm.

:)
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Nov 03, 2007 - 2:45PM #14
rmatth
Posts: 1,951
[QUOTE=brjohnbc;41906]JP ... you've probably already seen this site ... http://www.valyermo.com/ld-art.html   (Sorry I don't know how to do the linky thing on this new forum)
[/QUOTE]

Another site you might find helpful is Thomas Keeting's lessons on Lectio Divina.

According to the Ecclesiastical Latin Pronunciation Guide, the correct pronunciation is leCH-t-o.

C coming before e, ae, oe, i, y is pronounced like ch in Church
       e.g. caelum = che-loom
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Nov 03, 2007 - 7:01PM #15
phlipside
Posts: 269
As regards the pronunciation :eek:! 

My thanks to everyone for their input.  You've pointed me to several more resources I hadn't come across so far so that's great.  Plus you've really helped me focus on a couple of points I might have passed over.

And I will keep you up to date as it comes together.
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Nov 04, 2007 - 12:16AM #16
Mostyn32
Posts: 2,941
Lectio is Latin for "I read", and I've never heard it pronounced any other way than LECK-TEE-OH, with the emphasis on the first syllable. If it was to be pronounced LEK-SEE-OH, it would be spelled LEXIO. (I learned Latin long before I began the daily practice of Lectio Divina).

I use the reading for the day from 'Forward day by Day' .

What do I get out of it? Well, apart from the fact that it helps me centre myself for the coming day (I do Lectio Divina first thing in the morning), I find that it gives me a deeper appreciation of the text, helps me to read between the lines and better (though not always fully) understand the meaning and intent of the text. In the Conteplatio, I feel very close to God.

On the rare days when I don't do Lectio Divina in the morning, I am never really focused!
"God is no captious sophister, eager to trip us up whenever we say amiss, but a courteous tutor, ready to amend what, in our weakness or our ignorance, we say ill, and to make the most of what we say aright."  from 'A Learned Discourse on Justification', a sermon by Richard Hooker (1554-1600).
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Nov 04, 2007 - 12:56AM #17
rmatth
Posts: 1,951
Mostyn...you're right. The C comes before the T so it should have a K sound. I need new glasses.
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Nov 04, 2007 - 1:22AM #18
splendid
Posts: 310

phlipside wrote:

First - How do you SAY the term? I have an even split around here LEKTIO or LEXIO. No one seems certain that one way is "proper" over the other. I was introduced to it as LEKTIO but I've heard it both ways since. Any informed opinions?



dutch777 wrote:

Lek --- see ---oh Dah --- veen --- ah

Nope; never touch it myself.



Merope wrote:

Hey, phlipside -



I pronounce it: LEK-see-oh div-EE-na. I've not heard it pronounced any other way.









phlipside wrote:

Further research has added Lek -tsee-oh. Which is a bit of both:rolleyes: Yeesh.



rmatth wrote:

Another site you might find helpful is Thomas Keeting's lessons on Lectio Divina.

According to the Ecclesiastical Latin Pronunciation Guide, the correct pronunciation is leCH-t-o.

C coming before e, ae, oe, i, y is pronounced like ch in Church
e.g. caelum = che-loom



Mostyn32 wrote:

Lectio is Latin for "I read", and I've never heard it pronounced any other way than LECK-TEE-OH, with the emphasis on the first syllable. If it was to be pronounced LEK-SEE-OH, it would be spelled LEXIO. (I learned Latin long before I began the daily practice of Lectio Divina).


:D:D
So much for my dads assertion that the best thing about Latin was it was a "dead" language and as such you didn't need to worry much about your speaking it correctly.

Mape thanks I didn't realize it was spelled wrong (I can't spell in English let alone Latin) but I was thinking that Domini was Doe me ne which didn't ring any bells, while Doe me nay is familiar.:)

Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Nov 04, 2007 - 1:05AM #19
Mostyn32
Posts: 2,941
It saddens me that Latin, from which we derive much of our ecclesiastical and legal language is no longer taught in schools, and we end up not knowing how to pronounce the Latin phrases still in use in our liturgy. For instance, Domine is pronounced DOM-IN-AY, again with the emphasis on the first syllable.  And there was no hard V in Latin - V is sounded as W, so pax vobiscum should be pronounced PAX WOE-BIS-CUM (emphasis on the first syllable, as usual).

I'm grateful that, like Shakespeare, "I have some Latin and less Greek."
"God is no captious sophister, eager to trip us up whenever we say amiss, but a courteous tutor, ready to amend what, in our weakness or our ignorance, we say ill, and to make the most of what we say aright."  from 'A Learned Discourse on Justification', a sermon by Richard Hooker (1554-1600).
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Nov 04, 2007 - 10:12AM #20
Dutch777
Posts: 9,116
[QUOTE=Mostyn32;43641]It saddens me that Latin, from which we derive much of our ecclesiastical and legal language is no longer taught in schools, and we end up not knowing how to pronounce the Latin phrases still in use in our liturgy. For instance, Domine is pronounced DOM-IN-AY, again with the emphasis on the first syllable.  And there was no hard V in Latin - V is sounded as W, so pax vobiscum should be pronounced PAX WOE-BIS-CUM (emphasis on the first syllable, as usual).

I'm grateful that, like Shakespeare, "I have some Latin and less Greek."[/QUOTE]

Mostyn:
How Old Dutch just hates to be a pious, pedantic, Pecksniff ----but:

That's true in Classical Latin (which nobody spoke anyway, except in the Senate on state occasions, and nobody really understood what was being said.  People spoke vernacular Latin of two varieties: educated and plebian.  Modern Romance Languages are largely based on plebian Lation).

In Ecclesiastical Latin, however, there is a "V" which is pronounced as "vee".  E.L. also has the "J", a medieval development within the church (along with heretic-burnings and inquisitions).   Yes, I suffered through two years of ecclesiastical Latin in RC  schools (until I was expelled for recalcitrancy !)
:D
The Path
To Moon Lake
Doesn't Go
There.

So Walk
Your own Dharma*Path
And Be
Mindful

Dutch
Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 2 of 5  •  Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook