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Switch to Forum Live View What do you like about your church?
7 years ago  ::  Oct 13, 2007 - 2:50PM #1
Beliefnetsabee
Posts: 600
What do you like about your church? Please share your wonderful stories with us.
I always remember that for every word typed there is a real person sitting behind the keyboard.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 09, 2008 - 3:09AM #2
Vanessa86
Posts: 170
Hello, everyone. I am new to BeliefNet and this is my first post.

There are two main things I adore about my church:
1. The people are so welcoming and friendly, and have been since the first time I walked in. At the same time, no one is pushy about their beliefs or how they think I should believe. I feel safe there.

2. The music program is fantastic. It's one of the things that kept me coming back, and inspired me to join and become active in the music program. I hadn't sung with a group since a very brief stint in a church youth choir as a teen, and I wasn't even sure if I was good enough to join. But the group welcomed me warmly when I hesitantly poked my head into the music room, and has been so supportive as I have found, and strengthened, my voice. Singing the texts has helped me reconnect with my faith in a way that listening to a sermon cannot.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 10, 2008 - 10:08AM #3
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068
Welcome Vanessa!

I love your sig line!

I also greatly appreciate the music at our church. I cannot remember a time in my life that I have not been in one choir or another. We have a lot of great amateur* musicians. Almost all of our choir can read music, which makes things really interesting.

I also love the architecture of our sanctuary. Sadly most DOC churches are plain boxes with little ornamentation or, it would seem, attention paid to the esthetics. The folks who built this place back in 1966 did it up right. They hired one of the top architects in the city, and created a splendid example of mid-century modern sacred space.


*amateur in the original sense of "for the love of it".
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 13, 2008 - 2:40PM #4
Vanessa86
Posts: 170
Pleased to meet you, Campbellite! Your signature cracks me up! You should *definitely* put that on a business card.

I know what you mean about DoC church buildings (although I could add that the Church of Christ buildings I've been in beat out the DoC in that respect! Nothing but plain, and no ornamentation at all). I too am lucky to belong to a church that hired a great architect back in the 1950s-60s. Lots of wood and windows (so folks could appreciate God's nature outside), very lovely indeed. My husband and I were married there last year, and I count myself lucky to have had such a place to hold our wedding, and to go back week after week. It makes it so special to go each Sunday, and remember dancing down the aisle to Brahms after the ceremony, and all that happened.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2008 - 1:02AM #5
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068
My dad was an architect, so I guess I got it from him. :D

Frank Lloyd Wright said that "We shape our buildings, and thereafter, our buildings shape us." I feel that plain unadorned buildings shape our thinking to the idea that God is not interested in beauty, or visual arts. Rather, I think that our church buildings ought to be sermons in stone (or at least brick and morter, or wood, or what have you) and not just something to keep out the rain. A well designed church building ought to look like what it is, the house of God, a place where we may catch a glimpse of heaven.

Have you visited many DOC churches? Which are your favorites? I have some, but I would like to hear which ones you like. Do they speak to you? What do they say?
You are unique.
Just like everybody else.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2008 - 7:01PM #6
mecdukebec
Posts: 14,651
Some of the old "First Christian Church" buildings in the Midwest, usually in larger cities, and dating from the early 20th-century were Federal-style buildings, i.e. they looked more like banks, but they do have something about them that still moves me.
*******

"Wesley told the early Methodists to gain all they could and save all they could so that they could give all they could. It means that I consider my money to belong to God and I see myself as one of the hungry people who needs to get fed with God’s money. If I really have put all my trust in Jesus Christ as savior and Lord, then nothing I have is really my own anymore."
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2008 - 7:01PM #7
mecdukebec
Posts: 14,651
Some of the old "First Christian Church" buildings in the Midwest, usually in larger cities, and dating from the early 20th-century were Federal-style buildings, i.e. they looked more like banks, but they do have something about them that still moves me.
*******

"Wesley told the early Methodists to gain all they could and save all they could so that they could give all they could. It means that I consider my money to belong to God and I see myself as one of the hungry people who needs to get fed with God’s money. If I really have put all my trust in Jesus Christ as savior and Lord, then nothing I have is really my own anymore."
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2008 - 12:33AM #8
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068
Are you talking about the ones that are square, usually with the pulpit and table in one corner and the pews all facing that corner in a quarter circle? Many of them have a dome over the sanctuary.

That is known as the Akron plan. It was first used in Akron, Ohio, and was the model recommended by the Board of Church Extention back in the day. I have been in the one in Cynthiana KY which had two such squares side by side, and the pews formed a half circle, with a dome over each half of the sanctuary. Yeah! Two domes! There is a huge sliding wooden door which can be used to divide it in two.
You are unique.
Just like everybody else.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2008 - 4:53PM #9
Spirit-Wind
Posts: 308
[QUOTE=Campbellite;434921]My dad was an architect, so I guess I got it from him. :D

Frank Lloyd Wright said that "We shape our buildings, and thereafter, our buildings shape us." I feel that plain unadorned buildings shape our thinking to the idea that God is not interested in beauty, or visual arts. Rather, I think that our church buildings ought to be sermons in stone (or at least brick and morter, or wood, or what have you) and not just something to keep out the rain. A well designed church building ought to look like what it is, the house of God, a place where we may catch a glimpse of heaven.

Have you visited many DOC churches? Which are your favorites? I have some, but I would like to hear which ones you like. Do they speak to you? What do they say?[/QUOTE]

North Christian Church in Columbus, IN is a wonderful building.   It is worth the trip if you're in the area.  The people there are even better than the building!

Community Christian Church in Kansas City, MO is great.  It is a Frank Lloyd Wright.  Dr. Robert Lee Hill is the pastor.  You can't find a better pastor.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2008 - 6:11PM #10
mecdukebec
Posts: 14,651
No, I know the Akron plan, and pastor a church right now, with that sort of model.  I have been in many congregations built on that plan; gym to the right, sanctuary to the centre; classrooms to the left, or in the sanctuary-balcony.

The Federal style, at least as I define it, usually has a large, main sanctuary, with a balcony around most of the sanctuary.

Beautiful churches, from another time.  I`ve rarely seen a beautifully-built DoC congregation, today.  I was in D.C. these last few weeks, and stopped by Nat`l City Christian Church; seemed like a fine building, too much concrete, though, for my needs; but then, it was completed in the dark Depression, so that might have been a money-saver.  I hadn`t realised that there was a replica of Brother Campbell`s Bethany study on the grounds; it has stained glass therein: I doubt that Brother Alexander would abide stained glass in his original.  :)

I might have a chance to be in Columbus, Indiana soon, and have been meaning to check out the church there.
*******

"Wesley told the early Methodists to gain all they could and save all they could so that they could give all they could. It means that I consider my money to belong to God and I see myself as one of the hungry people who needs to get fed with God’s money. If I really have put all my trust in Jesus Christ as savior and Lord, then nothing I have is really my own anymore."
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