Post Reply
Page 1 of 4  •  1 2 3 4 Next
4 years ago  ::  Jun 22, 2010 - 6:58AM #1
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 938

My opinion on working sunday is that unless its a necessary job (such as working for the police force, or for the fire department, or working in a hospital, or working as an ambulence driver, or work in a nursing home doing care or something like that) then there should be a way to make sure people who are church goers can have sunday off all the time (if its possible, and by that I mean you could have some retail stores that either have a small number of staff or so much of the staff are church goers make it so the store wouldn't have enough sunday workers. Then it should be the every other sunday thing). I know though that in canada (at least I believe this is so) thats not legal to ask/ require an employee/ potential employee to say what religion they are. But if there was some way to make sure that people who need (either REALLY need, or need as in being a church goer or whatever) sunday (or another day if they are of another religion) off, workplaces should use it. That might also help determine how many of the employees needed every sat/ sunday off and determine if all of those who do can always get that day off each week. Its also a good idea too though that if a place like a clothing store, or costco or walmart or whatever is hiring and looking for someone who can work most, if not all weekends, to say this upfront, so that someone doesn't hired somewhere only to discover after they accepted the job that they have to work sundays. Thoughts?


JFG

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jun 22, 2010 - 8:52AM #2
tawonda
Posts: 4,367

I think accomodation works both ways. Yes, it's a good thing if employers allow persons with a religious obligation on a certain day to have that day off. On the other hand...in some occupations working on weekends is pretty much a given, and it's disengenuous to take such a job and then turn around and complain when one is (reasonably) asked to work on one's day of worship. It would be like my stepkids, who do hands-on managerial stuff in the entertainment industry in Orlando, to complain about working nights and weekends and holidays. That's when the work is.

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jun 22, 2010 - 10:02AM #3
Ironhold
Posts: 11,588

Jun 22, 2010 -- 8:52AM, tawonda wrote:


I think accomodation works both ways. Yes, it's a good thing if employers allow persons with a religious obligation on a certain day to have that day off. On the other hand...in some occupations working on weekends is pretty much a given, and it's disengenuous to take such a job and then turn around and complain when one is (reasonably) asked to work on one's day of worship. It would be like my stepkids, who do hands-on managerial stuff in the entertainment industry in Orlando, to complain about working nights and weekends and holidays. That's when the work is.





In fact, US employment law holds that an employer can make you work on Sunday if they can prove that not having you work is a burden on them; depending upon what state you live in, that burden can be as simple as leaving them short-handed.


 


The town I'm in is right next to a major military base, and so a lot of the members are soldiers or spouses of soldiers. Because of this, it's fairly common for some of them to be gone over the weekend, be it for duty, training, or other such functions. It's a part of the job, and so it's never held against them.

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jun 22, 2010 - 10:06AM #4
Bezant
Posts: 1,338

According to Catholic belief members' most solid, constant obligation on Sundays is to attend Mass. While the Church favours a work-less Sunday, it's guidelines so-to-speak are very relaxed on what one may or may not do on Sunday. Public welfare employees like doctors, law enforcement, or even metro employees in some cities are needed every day of the week to hold things down; some people, from small business owners to unskilled labourers, need to work on Sunday to keep their families afloat. For the most part, whether one shops or works on Sunday is left up to the individual, although the Church also says that we shouldn't create situations that keep Christians working on Sundays, as even the poorest man deserves rest.


I draw a circle between Saturday late afternoons and Sunday nights. Within it is God's time and my time. On Sunday evening I may review things I need to do for Monday, but generally these are mundane-ish tasks I wouldn't mind doing anyway. I also don't patronize shops unless its a necessity. I generally don't take the metro, but I think public travel is OK. In my opinion Sundays are a day of rest for Christians and we should gather the community.


I say there's much more pressure on Sunday labour in the States than Europe, in spite of the fact that Europe is less religious than the States. For Europeans taking Sunday off is a cultural habit rather than a religious one, geared to relaxation and getting mental rest, something Americans seem to understand far less. I've not just observed that with Sundays but also holidays, e.g., Easter, Christmas.


Jun 22, 2010 -- 6:58AM, jesusfreakgal wrote:


My opinion on working sunday is that unless its a necessary job (such as working for the police force, or for the fire department, or working in a hospital, or working as an ambulence driver, or work in a nursing home doing care or something like that) then there should be a way to make sure people who are churchgoers can have sunday off all the time (if its possible, and by that I mean you could have some retail stores that either have a small number of staff or so much of the staff are churchgoers make it so the store wouldn't have enough sunday workers. Then it should be the every other sunday thing).


I know though that in canada (at least I believe this is so) thats not legal to ask/ require an employee/ potential employee to say what religion they are. But if there was some way to make sure that people who need (either REALLY need, or need as in being a church goer or whatever) sunday (or another day if they are of another religion) off, workplaces should use it. That might also help determine how many of the employees needed every sat/ sunday off and determine if all of those who do can always get that day off each week. Its also a good idea too though that if a place like a clothing store, or costco or walmart or whatever is hiring and looking for someone who can work most, if not all weekends, to say this upfront, so that someone doesn't hired somewhere only to discover after they accepted the job that they have to work sundays. Thoughts?


JFG





Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jun 22, 2010 - 10:12AM #5
Bezant
Posts: 1,338

Jun 22, 2010 -- 8:52AM, tawonda wrote:


I think accomodation works both ways. Yes, it's a good thing if employers allow persons with a religious obligation on a certain day to have that day off. On the other hand...in some occupations working on weekends is pretty much a given, and it's disengenuous to take such a job and then turn around and complain when one is (reasonably) asked to work on one's day of worship. It would be like my stepkids, who do hands-on managerial stuff in the entertainment industry in Orlando, to complain about working nights and weekends and holidays. That's when the work is.




True, holidays are fair game too. In Fahrenheit 911 American soldiers had to conduct a raid on Christmas Eve.

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jun 22, 2010 - 10:57AM #6
smcisaac
Posts: 8,071

The Sabbath commandment is to rest one day out of every seven, not to reserve Sunday (or Saturday in some traditions) for worship.  It is the need for regular rest, not the particular day of worship, that is most important. 

"Truth did not come into the world naked, but it came in types and images. The world will not receive truth in any other way."  Gospel of Philip, Logion 72

"Christ will regenerate all things; through Him all things will be purged, and return into eternal life. And when the Son shall deliver up the kingdom to the Father, all things will be God; that is, all things will still exist, but God will exist in them, and they will be full of Him." Fabius Manus Victorinus, c. 350 AD
Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jun 22, 2010 - 12:26PM #7
anyuta64
Posts: 1,536

Jun 22, 2010 -- 10:57AM, smcisaac wrote:


The Sabbath commandment is to rest one day out of every seven, not to reserve Sunday (or Saturday in some traditions) for worship.  It is the need for regular rest, not the particular day of worship, that is most important. 





all true.  However, I think the original question here wasn't whether one should be able to not work on that day due to it being a day of rest, but rather becuase that is the day of worship in many groups.  Even if it doesn't HAVE to be, it often is the only day that some groups meet for worship.


So, if my chruch holds liturgy Sunday mornings, (although they could do so any or all other days) and there is no other option available for me, should I be able to expect not to have to work every single Sunday morning so that I may attend the services?   In other words, if worship services in your particular faith are only available at a set time, can you reasonably expect to be free of your work obligations at that time, if not every week then on some regular basis?


My answer to that is that the rules about when you would be expected to work should be clearly stated up front when you are hired.  they should say "your job would require you to be here every Sunday morning, your day off is Tuesday" or whatever the situation is.. and you would then be able to say "darn, I can't do that, becuase that's when I have to be at Chruch" or you can accept knowing up front that this is a requirement.  If this is the case, then there should be no complaints from either side, unless the rules changed.  I don't think employers should be mandated to allow poeple modified schedules based on religion, but I also think that to retain good employees they may choose to be flexible.

Passion is inversely proportional to the amount of real information available.

NOTE: This post is a natural product. The sleight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual charicter and beauty and in no way are to be considered flaws or defects.
Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jun 22, 2010 - 2:30PM #8
Hatman
Posts: 9,634
Here's the way i see it and the way i explain it:

On Easter Sunday morning, our Lord got up, folded up His graveclothes neatly, and went back to work.

Good enough for Him, good enough for me.

Warmest regards-

Hatman
"History records that the moneychangers have used every form of abuse, deceit, intrigue, and violent means possible to maintain their control over governments by controlling money and it's issuance."
-- James Madison(1751-1836), Father of the Constitution for the USA, 4th US President
Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jun 23, 2010 - 10:17AM #9
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 938

True Hatman, but the work Jesus was doing was specifically Godly work, and ours may not be.


JFG

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jun 23, 2010 - 3:19PM #10
Beautiful_Dreamer
Posts: 5,167

I've had jobs where I had to work on Sunday...I didn't complain, especially since if you wait tables then Sunday afternoon lunch is when you can make some really nice tips! I figure I'd say this as at least some sort of upside to having to work that day. Besides, I worked that day because I didn't have the luxury of not working as many hours as I possibly could because I had bills up to *here*...waiting tables was often my second job, a job I wouldn't have had to had had my debt not been so awful...anyway, some people don't have a choice but to work on Sunday or holidays.

More where that came from...

Writing I get paid to do

Beliefnet Community Host - Christian Faith and Life, Christian to Christian Debate
Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 1 of 4  •  1 2 3 4 Next
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook