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5 years ago  ::  Nov 29, 2009 - 3:34PM #1
Merope
Posts: 10,555

So today marks the beginning of Advent.  For (most) liturgical Christians, today is also the first day of the new liturgical year.


How do you observe the Advent season?  For instance, do you attend special services of lessons and carols?  Do you have favorite Advent hymns?  Do you make Advent wreaths and, if so, do you have particular traditions surrounding them?  Do your children (or you :-) make or follow Advent calendars?  What's your orientation as we move into the season?  If you're in a denomination that practices Confession, do you go to Confession during this season?  If you preach, how do you like to articulate the themes of the season in your homilies or sermons?  If you're clergy, how does this season affect you (and/or your congregation)?


I'm full of questions  :-)


 

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5 years ago  ::  Nov 29, 2009 - 7:14PM #2
Mostyn32
Posts: 2,941

When my children were young, we observed Advent at homer with the Advent calendar and an Advent wreath. Now that they're grown up and away, only the Advent wreath remains.


Advent is one of my favourite seasons in the church because it focuses on anricipation, hope, God's love and the journey of faith, and thereby I am more intentional in focusing on those things, too.


My Cathedral congregation holds its Festival of Advent Lessons and Carols on the second Sunday in Advent but unlike the traditional Advent Festival it is not a choir concert with occasional congregational involvement. Ours is the oldest Anglican parish west of the Great Lakes (on either side of the Canada-US border) and we draw on our 189 years of history to tell the Advent story through the life experiences of the people who pioneered in this part of the world. This year we're covering the lifetime of the man who was for 63 years a warden of the parish and he was also instrumental in shaping our province, our city and for the building of the present Cathedral in 1926. He lived from 1843 to 1934 and was an amazing person. 

"God is no captious sophister, eager to trip us up whenever we say amiss, but a courteous tutor, ready to amend what, in our weakness or our ignorance, we say ill, and to make the most of what we say aright."  from 'A Learned Discourse on Justification', a sermon by Richard Hooker (1554-1600).
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 29, 2009 - 7:30PM #3
anyuta64
Posts: 1,536

Nov 29, 2009 -- 3:34PM, Merope wrote:


So today marks the beginning of Advent.  For (most) liturgical Christians, today is also the first day of the new liturgical year.


How do you observe the Advent season?  For instance, do you attend special services of lessons and carols?  Do you have favorite Advent hymns?  Do you make Advent wreaths and, if so, do you have particular traditions surrounding them?  Do your children (or you :-) make or follow Advent calendars?  What's your orientation as we move into the season?  If you're in a denomination that practices Confession, do you go to Confession during this season?  If you preach, how do you like to articulate the themes of the season in your homilies or sermons?  If you're clergy, how does this season affect you (and/or your congregation)?


I'm full of questions  :-)


 





I had an advent calendar every year wehn I was a kid, but for various reasons I don't think mhy kids ever had one.


we try to fast (at least no meat), and we do decorate for Christmas.  We go to Confession regularly anyway, so that's nothing special for th seaons.  Mostly, as in all fasting seasons, we try to re-focus on God.  usually we go away for much of the season, and it's hard to focus on the usual Advent activities when you're on vacation.   But this year we're staing home, and I hope to use the opportunity to really make Advednt a special time.

Passion is inversely proportional to the amount of real information available.

NOTE: This post is a natural product. The sleight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual charicter and beauty and in no way are to be considered flaws or defects.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 29, 2009 - 9:30PM #4
Xristocharis
Posts: 5,051

I'm particularly fond of O Come, O Come Emmanuel since learning that it's an Advent hymn rather than a Christmas hymn.


Around here we try to spend some time on Sunday night for family prayer and biblical meditation.


I love the Advent season, meditating not only on the hopeful expectation of Israel and the Prophets of God's redemption, but also translating that into our own present hopeful expectation and longing for His return to set all things right.


Amen, come Lord Jesus.


-Jon

"When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." - Dom Hélder Câmara
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 29, 2009 - 11:05PM #5
Ironhold
Posts: 11,583

To my knowledge, the LDS faith has no particular celebrations for advent per se. The church does generally do a few special broadcasts, but that's about it.


Rather, each individual congregant and congregation is largely free to do as they please, provided that their activities fall within church standards.


 


My maternal grandmother was a war bride; she was born and raised in Germany, later coming to the United States after marrying an American soldier who was in-country as part of the occupation forces. As such, German activities have become part of the family tradition, to a greater or lesser degree.


Regardless of everything else that transpires, one tradition that continues is the advent calendar. Each child - and now grandchild - gets their own calendar, with the only limits being how many we can obtain at a time as there is only one store in the area that carries them. We used to also do things like Kinder Eggs, but currently they are unavailable locally.

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5 years ago  ::  Nov 30, 2009 - 12:31AM #6
dearwatson
Posts: 168

I'm going to wear blue (somewhere) every day.

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5 years ago  ::  Nov 30, 2009 - 12:29PM #7
Mostyn32
Posts: 2,941

That's an interesting idea, dearwatson. Do you wear blue throughout Advent every year? I'd never heard of this until I saw your post. A woman of my acquaintance wears blue on the first Sunday of Advent , white or gold on Christmas Day, purple on the first Sunday of Lent, white on Easter Day and red on the Feast of Pentecost, but I've always thought her just a titch quirky!  

"God is no captious sophister, eager to trip us up whenever we say amiss, but a courteous tutor, ready to amend what, in our weakness or our ignorance, we say ill, and to make the most of what we say aright."  from 'A Learned Discourse on Justification', a sermon by Richard Hooker (1554-1600).
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 30, 2009 - 6:59PM #8
tawonda
Posts: 4,367

In our home we keep an Advent calendar and have an Advent wreath. (You can see the latter while scrolling through recent posts on our church blog, hopeinrhodes.blogspot.com.) We have midweek Advent services at our church, beginning this Wednesday -- quiet, contemplative services using a liturgy called Holden Evening Prayer. (You can catch a bit of that here, in use as a Lenten liturgy in an ELCA congregation in Minnesota: www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOuFPb0H8C0.)


In liturgical traditions like ours Advent is a penitential season, like Lent, but with an air of quiet hope; the penitence is certainly not about beating ourselves up, nor is it even about trying to relate to Christ's suffering, but rather about "cleaning house," the way a mom-to-be, in those last days before birth, often gets an urge to clean ans scrub and throw things out and prepare her home in just the right way. The first couple weeks of Advent have an eschatological focus -- the advent focused on is Jesus' Second Coming, not his first. After that, though, the action shifts back to the events preceding Jesus' birth in Bethlehem.


I'm blogmeister and Facebook facilitator for our congregation, and I'm finding it very challenging, in a good way, to convey these concepts in new ways. We also have a lot of new members who aren't Lutheran "from home" and who aren't necessarily very aware of what Advent is all about, so I feel a strong need to make this part of the Church year accessible and understandable to them, something they can live into and explain to their children.


I'm also a frequent assisting minister -- I help lead part of the liturgy, and I compose our weekly Prayers of the Church (petitions for "the world, the whole people of God in Christ Jesus and all people according to their needs," with an eye to the specific Scripture lessons of the day) and every couple of months I preach a lay sermon. My duties during Advent are the same except that, instead of our usual opening prayer, I lead prayer as our acolyte lights our church Advent wreath.


Oh -- I'm trying to write one Advent blog post a day on my own blog: lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com.


 

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5 years ago  ::  Dec 05, 2009 - 12:26PM #9
he-man
Posts: 3,869

Nov 29, 2009 -- 3:34PM, Merope wrote:


So today marks the beginning of Advent.  For (most) liturgical Christians, today is also the first day of the new liturgical year.


How do you observe the Advent season?  For instance, do you attend special services of lessons and carols?  Do you have favorite Advent hymns?  Do you make Advent wreaths and, if so, do you have particular traditions surrounding them?  Do your children (or you :-) make or follow Advent calendars?  What's your orientation as we move into the season?  If you're in a denomination that practices Confession, do you go to Confession during this season?  If you preach, how do you like to articulate the themes of the season in your homilies or sermons?  If you're clergy, how does this season affect you (and/or your congregation)?


I'm full of questions  :-)


The first question to answer is what does Advent mean to you?


έλευσεται coming, Advent
ερχομός Advent Second Coming of Christ
αφιξις arrival, appearance, incoming
from the Ancient Greek Library


αφιξις The reaching of a goal or objective as a result of effort or a process


παρουσία presence ME: via OFr. from L. praesentia 'being at hand', from praeesse (Collins English Dictionary )

1Ch 25:5  All these were the sons of Heman the king’s seer (chozeh= to see) in the words of God, to lift up the horn.
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5 years ago  ::  Dec 06, 2009 - 2:16PM #10
Mostyn32
Posts: 2,941

Thanks for the Greek lesson, he-man, but Advent derives from the Latin not the Greek. It has its roots in ad venire, which means "to come toward".  It is not about the second coming of Christ; it is the preparation period for the commemoration of the first coming, i.e. Christmas.


During Advent, those who observe it do so by preparing their hearts and minds for the coming of God into the world in the person of the baby in Bethlehem. For some it is a penitential time, for others a focusing on the great gift that is coming into the world and what that means in our lives and our relationship with the Divine.  

"God is no captious sophister, eager to trip us up whenever we say amiss, but a courteous tutor, ready to amend what, in our weakness or our ignorance, we say ill, and to make the most of what we say aright."  from 'A Learned Discourse on Justification', a sermon by Richard Hooker (1554-1600).
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