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6 years ago  ::  Mar 23, 2009 - 3:54AM #1
saphoe
Posts: 5

Greetings!


 


I've read, so far, the Sevenwaters trilogy and 'Blade of Fortriu'. How is what she's saying about the land, the Old Ones and the Fairy Folk connected to the real source of what Celtic is about?


 


How are these old Irish stories connected to what's happening today? as in are there many who need to rid the enchanted isle of the hated Britons? Is it the voices of the 'Old ONes' telling people to take back the land or they'll lose it for good?


 


I'm several generations Celtic, as in I have the red hair genes so it's readily apparent in my appearance, yet wasn't actually born in either Ireland or Scotland I feel roots in Celtic yet not well versed in it as a living practice.   Books that weave the stories like Juliet Marillier immediately fill a need within my heart - to find my roots - who do I belong to - what ethnic group do I have claim to?  Otherwise in a diverse community where other ethnic groups spend all their time together never mixing, staying apart from others I'm left feeling very alone, very alienated, isolated, not belonging even though I've spent years travelling & living amongst other cultures, nations adapting to their ways - learning, absorbing.


 


So in fact are the Fairy Folk or the Old Ones (within the land itself) actually the 'religion' itself?


What is the original Celtic religion? the land? the nature of the land? animism? is it one with paganism? but there's paganism in England so isn't it different? isn't Celtic unique to the land?


 


Is it perhaps feeding into todays 'land grab' politics? I wonder sometimes when I start to feel too cozy with identifying with ethnic group or land if it's not a good thing after all. But then everyone else is doing it so why can't I?


 


 


 

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 23, 2009 - 6:23PM #2
Liriodendron
Posts: 36

Hey Saphoe,  I was trying to reply before I had to stop for supper and my daughters orchestra concert - BUT the post got lost in cyberspace.  I'll hopefully be able to try again before bed.    -Lillian

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 23, 2009 - 9:58PM #3
Liriodendron
Posts: 36

Akk.  It did it again.  I'm going to post in little pieces...


1st - I haven't read Juliet Marillier, so hopefully Martin or someone else will happen along to answer that one.

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 23, 2009 - 10:23PM #4
Liriodendron
Posts: 36

2nd - After about 6 months of reading and thinking about Celtic spirituality, I finally am beginning to feel that I understand it.   .... and I like it.  Basically it's about seeing God in everything around you including people.  They didn't divide things up into "inferior" physical things and "superior" spiritual things like the Greeks and Romans (influenced by Gnosticism).  Since life from God, every thing alive has God's spirit deep down in it.  It's not like they didn't see the evil in people or feel that Jesus was not needed to reconcile us to God, but I feel like they respected nature and people more than the Roman Christians at that time.  The Roman Christians accused one of the Celtic teachers of trying to revive druid philosophy.  That why I think the world view of seeing god in everything was to some degree pre-Christian.  Their belief in fairy folk shows how they don't see the physical as so very separated from the spiritual.

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 23, 2009 - 10:30PM #5
Liriodendron
Posts: 36

3rd - Celtic Christians kept a lot more of their pre-christian world view that the Pope approved of, but they were so far away that the Pope could not really control them for a while.  I think that's part of the why the Irish were so willing to convert to Christianity.


Some other cool things I learned about pre-christian celts that I read about in a book called "Druids":


They really respected women as equals - at least in comparison to other groups.


Celts all had the right to a certain amount of free medical care - the different areas (villages/clans?) were required to maintain hospitals and support doctors.


They loved justice and the rule of law.

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 23, 2009 - 10:36PM #6
Liriodendron
Posts: 36

And finally...  I'm pretty far from my Celtic ancestors too - they came to the US in the 1700's and were lowland Scotts.  Plus I'm a brunette - SO, if I can get into Celtic spirituality so can you.  One book that helped (and it may be online) is the Carmina Gadelica, whic is a collection of prayers and incantations.  They really give my insight into what mattered to the Christian Celts.  Another book I read was "The Celtic Way of Prayer".   Martin has a list of other recommended books.


BTW, what do you mean about "land grab" politics?  In my opinion, anyone with a Celtic mindset would be practicing "save the earth" politics.

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 24, 2009 - 7:47AM #7
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237

Dia annseo isteach!


God to all here!


Greetings Saphoe,


And welcome to our little (quiet) Celtic Corner.  Its always nice to meet other travelers on the Celtic Way.  As for what CC is, it is simply the Christian Gospel as the Celtic peoples understood it in the Early Church, both catholic and orthodox.  Over the centuries, it was replaced by the more powerful Roman Church but continued on in the hearts and minds of the Celtic peoples up to today.  It is not so much a church as a journey in Celtic Christian Spirituality.


How are these old Irish stories connected to what's happening today?  Well, the stories and legends are part of our heritage, our psyche, our soul and heart.  Yet, they are not part of our worship!  Its just more how we see the world around as God made it.  Rather than 'reclaiming the land' for ourselves, God asks us to live in harmony with all of Creation, nature and humanity.  That begins with being in Harmony with ourselves.


As Lillian said, it is not about being born a 'celt', its about choosing the Celtic Way of seeing and acting.  As for books to read, I would strongly suggest J.Philip Newell's Listening for the Heartbeat of God as an excellent starting place for you.  Its not a novel and it will help give you an understanding of what we are about.


The earliest Celts didn't worship the land, they worshiped the spirits within all things.  The knew these spirits were a manifestation of The Source of all life.  When Christianity came to them they received the full revelation of Who the Source was!  We honor and reverence both the Scriptures as well as Creation as a revelation of God.  Or, we worship the source of all life within all things, as Lillian has already said.


I know there were more questions in your original post but I think these will give you a good start to understanding us.  Please feel free to come back and continue this discussion with any other questions as well.  Thanks again for joining us and waking us from our slumber...


Slan,


Marty


 

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 26, 2009 - 2:20PM #8
saphoe
Posts: 5

thank you to both for your input. i'll reference the books suggested. am very grateful for your prompt replies.

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