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6 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2008 - 11:19PM #1
Liriodendron
Posts: 36
Hi,
I'm a landscape architect in Georgia, USA.  I grew up Southern Baptist and still go to a Baptist church but I always like to understand others spiritual ideas.  I'm getting more and more interested in ecology and how humans can live in harmony with nature.

I'm interested in Celtic Christianity because of the way it connects with the creation, because of how honest and practical the old prayers are, because it didn't reject everything in it's culture.

I also play the violin and I'm learning Scottish and Irish fiddle tunes.  I wonder how far back that music goes?

My ancestory is pretty mixed since we've been in North American since the early 1700's but a fair amount were Scotch-Irish.  Being Presbyterian, I don't even know how connected they ever were to Celtic Christianity.
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 11, 2008 - 7:55AM #2
mfjfarrell
Posts: 236
Dia annseo isteach!
God to all here!

Greetings Liriodendron,

Ta failte!  Be welcomed!  Thanks for searching us out here on Beliefnet, we are a rather small pocket of Christianity as you may have noticed.

Your interests in CC are all valid and sometimes give us the title of 'Green Religion'.  Its true, we seek harmony with ourselves, God and all Creation (mankind and nature).  Many hold onto the theology of their previous affiliations and attempt to 'put on a green mantle' to their thinking.  So, you are in good company here. 

Our ancestors had a slightly different approach, however.  In the Great Schism of the Early Church, those in the Celtic lands leaned more towards Eastern theology than that of Rome.  In the East, mankind is seen as an 'icon' of Christ, inherently good but flawed by his selfishness.  This is opposed to the Roman/Calvinist view of the 'corruption' of mankind after the Fall.

Here, we are a 'mixed bag of nuts'... choose whichever path you want to follow and you'll be in good company!  Its a nice little fellowship of believers.  As I see the Celtic Way of Spirituality, it is a path we walk according to the leading of the Holy Spirit.  CC evangelized more by example than words (I Peter 3:15), so expect to be greeted just as you are!

By the way, my name is Marty, I'm a member here since Beliefnet started this new site.  I'm the result of Irish Catholic upbringing, Pentecostal conversion, and a Celtic heart that always knew there was 'something more' to this life than joining a club.  Be welcomed..!!

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 11, 2008 - 11:11AM #3
seekerdrd
Posts: 98
Greetings! Welcome to the journey. Like Marty said, we all come from varied backgrounds and incorporate CC to various degrees. I happen to have converted from Celtic paganism. Thanks for being open to responding, and feel free to ask anything. We'll do our best to answer or help find an answer if we don't know.

Peace,
David
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 12, 2008 - 12:33AM #4
Liriodendron
Posts: 36
Thanks guys for the welcome.

>"Many hold onto the theology of their previous affiliations and attempt to 'put on a green mantle' to their thinking."<
My current affiliation is mostly important because the people there are important to me.  I am finding, however that I am not so good at holding the "party line", the more I read and research - especially about origins, end times, and politics.  One thing about Southern Baptist is that there is actually a bigger range of opinion than most realize; each church is independent and the members are often ornery in their independence.

Your East/West comparison about the fall of man is very interesting.  I’d like to see a thread on it; I guess I could go make one.

Seekerdrd, that’s fascinating that you converted from Celtic paganism.  Did you go straight to Celtic Christianity?

Do you guys go to an actual Celtic church?  Is there any such thing as a Celtic church?
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 12, 2008 - 12:33AM #5
Liriodendron
Posts: 36
Thanks guys for the welcome.

>"Many hold onto the theology of their previous affiliations and attempt to 'put on a green mantle' to their thinking."<
My current affiliation is mostly important because the people there are important to me.  I am finding, however that I am not so good at holding the "party line", the more I read and research - especially about origins, end times, and politics.  One thing about Southern Baptist is that there is actually a bigger range of opinion than most realize; each church is independent and the members are often ornery in their independence.

Your East/West comparison about the fall of man is very interesting.  I’d like to see a thread on it; I guess I could go make one.

Seekerdrd, that’s fascinating that you converted from Celtic paganism.  Did you go straight to Celtic Christianity?

Do you guys go to an actual Celtic church?  Is there any such thing as a Celtic church?
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 13, 2008 - 3:21PM #6
seekerdrd
Posts: 98
When I began re-evaluating Christianity, I looked at various denominations, styles, etc. and tried a few out, but part of me just didn't connect. So I took a step back and began researching CC to understand why and how the ancient Celts converted. The more I studied, the more it felt like coming home.

There are many churches that claim to be Celtic Churches, but again they vary from just using Celtic music to absorbing Celtic theology. Though some might argue this, there isn't any such thing as one modern church that is the descendant of the old CC. I think there are some that are trying to recreate CC in a modern context though.

David
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