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6 years ago  ::  Sep 30, 2008 - 9:30AM #1
seekerdrd
Posts: 98
Working within the parameters of the traditional view of sin, is there such a thing as a heirarchy of sin where one sin is greater than another, or is sin one and the same since it is an action/belief/lifestyle that separates us from God?

(My mother and I were discussing this a few days ago. She believes one way, and I another. I'll refrain from espousing or arguing my view until I hear from some of you.)

David
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2008 - 3:42AM #2
Tassiecelt
Posts: 46
Good question, my only guide is the Bible, 1 John 5 is good reading here. John speaks of "sin which is not unto death" and "sin which is unto death".

so my simple answer to your question is yes.

There is also the "unpardonable sin" - blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. But aside from that, the love and forgiveness of God must be always kept in the forefront of our minds.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2008 - 11:22AM #3
seekerdrd
Posts: 98
Graham,

Thanks for the input. I'll go and read 1 John 5 and get back with you. I do know about the "unpardonable sin," but I'm not really sure what exactly it means to blaspheme the Holy Spirit.  Any thoughts?

David
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5 years ago  ::  Oct 21, 2008 - 11:35AM #4
seekerdrd
Posts: 98
Graham,

I hope you haven't given up on me! I'm still meditating over 1 John, and trying also to work out what it means for someone to blaspheme the Holy Spirit.

David
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 12, 2008 - 1:01AM #5
Liriodendron
Posts: 36
Just from memory, when Jesus talked about blaspheming the Holy Spirit, it was right after the religious leaders were accussing Him of using Satanic power to do his miracles when it was ovious that He was using the Holy Spirit's power.  So I would say that blaspheming the Holy Spirit would be to deliberately accuse Him of being evil.  I'm not sure though, how exactly that sounds like during this day and age.

Concerning your opening post, my gut feeling is that there are degrees of sin depending on your intentions.  Some things we do out of hatred or stuborn rebellion and some we do by being mixed up or undisciplined.

I would say that sins are worse the more they hurt people, but I'm remembering that Jesus said that anger was the same as murder.  I guess that's because the intention or malice is the same.  However, from the victim's view point, I much rather someone commit a sin of anger towards me than the sin of murder.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 12, 2008 - 1:01AM #6
Liriodendron
Posts: 36
Just from memory, when Jesus talked about blaspheming the Holy Spirit, it was right after the religious leaders were accussing Him of using Satanic power to do his miracles when it was ovious that He was using the Holy Spirit's power.  So I would say that blaspheming the Holy Spirit would be to deliberately accuse Him of being evil.  I'm not sure though, how exactly that sounds like during this day and age.

Concerning your opening post, my gut feeling is that there are degrees of sin depending on your intentions.  Some things we do out of hatred or stuborn rebellion and some we do by being mixed up or undisciplined.

I would say that sins are worse the more they hurt people, but I'm remembering that Jesus said that anger was the same as murder.  I guess that's because the intention or malice is the same.  However, from the victim's view point, I much rather someone commit a sin of anger towards me than the sin of murder.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 13, 2008 - 3:27PM #7
seekerdrd
Posts: 98
I guess from my perspective, (I would love for people to challenge me or try and persuade me differently so that I can refine my thinking) I feel like sin is sin, and no one sin is greater than another in God's eyes (save perhaps blaspheming the Spirit). I think we as humans tend to make hierarchies of sin as a way of making ourselves feel better. If I can say, "Look at me. At least I'm not as bad as Charles Manson." I can feel better about myself and usually become a bit complacent about my own walk. But if I view sin as equal, then I am forced to view myself as the same, and therefore find it easier to have compassion for my fellow man and to help them redirect their lives in a loving way, accept correction with an open spirit, and walk together through this life.

David
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