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Switch to Forum Live View How is Celtic Christianity practised?
6 years ago  ::  Jun 20, 2008 - 7:05AM #1
winding_branch
Posts: 3
Hi,

I'm new to the board but not Christianity. However I am looking for deeper ways to connect to God & his creation. I find the lack of connection to God's creation in church based Christianity a turn off. Maybe it's because Iused to be pagan?! Can anyone teach me the basics of Celtic Christianity? and help me connect to God through his creation. I have only found ways of doing so via the pagan wheel of the year & this doesn't sit well with me. Is there another more pure way of practising this age old form of Christianity that is available to people today?

Thanks
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 20, 2008 - 1:28PM #2
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Dia annseo isteach!
God to all here!

Greetings,

Welcome to our little corner of Beliefnet.  "Can anyone teach me the basics of Celtic Christianity?"  Yes, CC is a journey.  It begins with learning to see the Christ, your Source, within you.  Its easier to see His plan for you life when you understand the 'why' He made you the way He did!  This is getting to know Him as well much better!  Finally, you will be called upon 'seeing' Him in the world around you, in Nature as well as all the people He brings into your day.  When you can see Him in others, it will change the way you deal with them!

Unlike Eastern and Western Churches, and perhaps even paganism, there is no ritual to perform or magic prayers to utter.  Its about the reality of Committment to Christ and serving Him in everything you do.  Your life will become a dialogue and fellowship as you move into and through obedience to His plan.

Of course, Celts were scholars!  Study as much as you can, there is a wealth of information out there that is useful to your growth.  I would reccommend J. Philp Newell's 'Listening for the Heartbeat of God' as a starter.  Feel free to bring any questions here or to any of the other CC chat sites.  They are always looking for 'newbies'!

Thanks again for coming bye... please feel free also to check out the previous posts here.  They may be of use to you as well...

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 21, 2008 - 6:09AM #3
winding_branch
Posts: 3
Hi Marty,

Thanks for you reply. My study so far has been a bit confusing. I have come across relevances to the British Anglican table of moveable feasts from the book of common prayer as a basis for practise. Is such a calendar of events used by everyone? & also relevance to the honouring of saints. However, then also I bought a book recently that uses the pagan wheel of the year as a basis for practise. Is either right or am I way off the mark?

I'm from an evangelical charismatic church background, so saints aren't relevant to me. You say there are no rituals etc to follow. Does this mean that the modern expression of this faith is down to individual taste? Also I am very interested in God centred meditation, in which to absorb the word. I find the psalms inspiring & filled with nature. Is meditation used as part of Celtic Christian practise?

Thanks in advance

Shaz
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 21, 2008 - 7:02AM #4
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Dia annseo isteach!
God to all here!

Greetings Shaz,

"Is such a calendar of events used by everyone?" - Yes, its used by those who follow the Anglican tradition, not all.  Most of us come from a previous tradition and view CC from within that tradition still.  If you search the net you will see that all three sects of Christianity claim CC as their idea.  To some extent there are associations to all of them!

CC is an expression of Christianity as viewed by the Celtic Culture of Western Europe.  It was brought there by missionaries from Rome.  Its Theology is from the Early Church, similar to modern Orthodoxy.  While in communion with Rome on most issues, the Celtic Churches felt free to respectfully decline Rome's assertions of supremacy making themselves a champion to many Protestants.  You will also find many pagans and wiccans claim it as well!  Yet, it remains distinct from all of them in its own inherent characteristics. (very short history) 

As for remembering Saints and observing calendars, both have their places in CC but are not the major purpose.  CC is not about keeping the past alive, its about learning to see Christ in All in preparation for Eternity!  As you study CC, you may come across a saint or two that impresses you.  You may think to yourself, I want to be like him/her.  That's reverencing the saints the same as someone at your former church that you admired because of their Christian walk!  It doesn't inhibit your relationship with Christ, rather, it exemplifies Christ within them!  The pagan wheel of life has added its own 'sabbats' that were not part of the original Celtic Wheel of Life.  It is fine to thank God for his handiwork in all the seasons of the year.  We use Nature as 'the first Book of His Revelation' and is worth studying and even sharing worship with God within! (Nature - cathedral without walls)

As for rituals, what I meant, since you mentioned your pagan past, was that there are not initiations or chants that you need to perform to be accepted!  Previous pagans/wiccans have asked that.  What I did emphasize is the life of prayer!  That is something that become a constant as much as breathing.  There is a book entitled the 'Carmina Gadelica' which is a record of the prayers our ancestors used to use in their lives.  After you finish Newell's 'Listening for the Heartbeat of God' you might want to check out his two 'individual' prayer books, 'Celtic Benediction' and 'Sounds of the Eternal'.  They follow the same tradition as the 'CG' in a more contemporary vein.  I use them but also include 'conversational prayer', like you, from my Evangelical background as well.  They really help to focus your prayer time!

"Also I am very interested in God centered meditation, in which to absorb the word." - Meditation is a part of your formal daily prayer time, yes!  Listening is the purpose!!  When you hear His voice... Do It!!!  That is part of the dialog I spoke of earlier.  CC is not a 'me-centric' religion, its one of service in all aspects of life.

I think I have answered most of your questions.  I know it can be over whelming in the beginning but, as I said before, we are all on a journey.  This journey is not about the accumulation of knowledge but rather learning to serve Him in all we do.  Be content to learn gradually as the Spirit leads within you...

May God continue to guide and bless you...

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 21, 2008 - 1:06PM #5
winding_branch
Posts: 3
Hi Marty,

Thanks for answering my questions so clearly. I'm sure I will enjoy Philip's books as I am an avid reader- a bit of a bookaholic really! I do not have any more questions for now.

Bless u

Shaz
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 21, 2008 - 1:06PM #6
winding_branch
Posts: 3
Hi Marty,

Thanks for answering my questions so clearly. I'm sure I will enjoy Philip's books as I am an avid reader- a bit of a bookaholic really! I do not have any more questions for now.

Bless u

Shaz
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6 years ago  ::  Aug 10, 2008 - 10:15AM #7
earlychristian
Posts: 2
Try this out:

www.celticsynod.org
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6 years ago  ::  Aug 10, 2008 - 10:30AM #8
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Greetings EC,

And welcome!  I'm familiar with the group you mentioned.  Actually, there are many such groups on the net, all seem to imply/state that they are the 'true' remnant of the original Celtic Church.  However, no such statements can factually be made.  CC didn't survive as a church, it was a lifestyle with the Celtic peoples.

These groups, however, do preach the gospel!  It's usually similar to the founders backgrounds in theology and format but with a few celtic prayers to replace their former ones.  The theology however is still strongly Catholic, Orthodox or Protestant and only give 'lip service' to Celtic understandings of Creation.  They are good and worthwhile as a local body of Christ but still lacking in the essentials others hold as essential to CC.

Thanks for your participation here, new comers are always welcomed!

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 19, 2008 - 7:50PM #9
pio_child
Posts: 43
I am also a seeker. I fell in love with the Celtic Daily Prayer book. I also am in a group (on MSN) of
The Community of Saint Cuthbert. They are known as Ancient Christianity. I call myself a cafateria Catholic, as I am a RC. I have been on a search for a long time. I thought I might find my place in the Episcopal/Anglican Church but, they are so focussed on the battle within the church. It is on the verge of breaking apart. The focus is internal and not on the work the church should be doing. I sometimes don't feel I belong anywhere.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 19, 2008 - 9:07PM #10
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Dia annseo isteach!
God to all here!

Greetings Pio,

And welcome to Celtic Christianity's little corner of Belief net.  I'm glad you feel at peace in the Celtic Way.  If you are open to some daily devotionals, allow me to recommend J. Philip Newell's two be known personal devotionals, 'Celtic Benediction' and 'Sounds of the Eternal'.  They are more in line with the actual Celtic way of prayer than the one you mentioned.

Please feel free to share or ask anything that is on your heart....

Slan,
Marty
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