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6 years ago  ::  Jun 07, 2008 - 8:43AM #1
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Dia annseo isteach!
God to all here!

Greetings all,

I made a posting on CCS the other day that I thought I'd share here also.  Perhaps there are some here who would appreciate a redirection to help with Celtic Theology.  Below, please find the body of my original post there.  If you've already read it or are in the process of reading it, please feel free to discuss your thoughts with us.  And yes, I'm always open to controversy!

I am almost finished with a book my wife had given me to read. Its called [I]'The Shack' by William P. Young. Its not put out by any of the typical Christian publishers and its been ranked in second place on the weekly '10 Best Sellers' for quite some time now.

What strikes me about this book is its theology! There isn't anything that isn't reflective of our Celtic beliefs in it! I've never read Young before but it seems as though he is familiar with Celtic Spirituality. I'll highly recommend this to you and hope that there can be some discussion of it at a future time.[/I]

May God bless you all in its reading...

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Sep 02, 2008 - 10:51AM #2
seekerdrd
Posts: 98
Hey, Marty,
Just got done reading The Shack. I had heard such powerful things about it, and how it just rocked some people's world. I didn't find it that earth shattering, probably due to the fact that there was nothing in it that wasn't already a part of my theology, lol. I do agree that there is quite a bit of harmony with Celtic Spirituality. I can see, however, how it might affect those with a more "traditional" theology, and I recommend reading it. Thanks for being in the circle of those who shared it with me.

Slan,
David
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6 years ago  ::  Sep 03, 2008 - 12:49PM #3
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Dia annseo isteach!
God to all here!

Hey David,

I'm glad you read 'The Shack' and see the similarities to CC.  A God of Love is just so different from the Western view of corruption and punishment!  I thought it was very creative to give specific personalities to each of the Trinity as well.  I'm not really sure which of them I can relate to best.  Guess I'll just have to love all three!

I was actually surprised at the lack of 'backlash' from the Fundamentalist sections!  Everything I've heard so far has been positive about it.  Some considered it 'suspect' and are holding reservations on their opinion.  Perhaps they are waiting for someone from a pulpit to tell them when they should think?

One of our members at CCS found this site about an interview with the author.  It was quite good and interesting to hear the background for it.  Enjoy http://cwahm.com/podcast/teleconference.mp3 !
(sorry.. it appears the link no longer works!)

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Sep 09, 2008 - 7:25AM #4
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Dia annseo isteach!
God to all here!

Greetings all,

I came across this review of 'The Shack' and thought I'd like to post it in a few sites including here.  I hope you will enjoy its reading...

"The Real Controversy about "The Shack"

A culture of change has become the pervading surety of our modern (and post-modern) society. The old adage rings truer than ever- "The only thing constant is change". A couple weeks back, I was stuck in a Wal -Mart at midnight, looking for some power cabling for my laptop. While I waited for someone, I was browsing the book selection. I found an interesting looking title called "the Shack". Little did I know it was the current "buzz book" in the church in the last year. I am not a fast reader, so it took me a couple weeks to get through it. It was a delight.

As I read the book my heart softened, but not gently. I was wounded, beaten, blessed, nurtured, comforted and loved in a cascade of amazing imagery and powerful writing that wore down the pretentious religiosity that lives, to some degree, in each of us. William Young attacks the prejudices of a Christianity lived outside of actual personal relationship with Christ. He uses various devices in his fictional story to bring home the point that we must stop living and believing in a God that is as limited in scope and understanding as we are. His poignant reality in the lives of his characters in "the Shack" echos our cold hearts, living in a rules-based, shame-centered religiosity that claims as many victims as it saves. Critics have assailed the book as being bad theology, but for fictional a script that never claims to be doctrine it hits the jugular of where American Christianity has failed time and time again-- at understanding and living in the love of God.

One could argue that the images and metaphors may not sit well with the buttoned-down theocrats , and that, yes, perhaps the allegories aren't perfect at every level. But the over-arching nuance of Young's book is not that we need a theology class- it's that we need to actually live what we say we believe. That God is love. That His efforts towards us have always been completely done in love, and will continue so. That His primary purposeful intent in dealing with mankind is to make Himself and His love completely and gloriously sufficient for us, whilst giving us the freedom to reciprocate that love back to Him in words and lives of praise, thanksgiving and worship. I am purposefully not going to give away any of the book plot. You can find details on it here:

Hardcover http://www.popularchristian.com/product … s_id=28720

Softcover http://www.popularchristian.com/product … s_id=26107

Audio Book http://www.popularchristian.com/product … s_id=28300

I do want to comment on the most controversial parts of the book, that are drawing criticism. Primarily, readers will discover that the book centers around the main character (Mack) and his weekend encounter with God. In Young's story, the Trinity is articulated through 3 distinct personalities. Specifically, the Father is portrayed as a joyful, and thoroughly loving, black woman. For some Christian leaders, even though this is a fictional story, this rendering has them railing against "the Shack". It's no wonder the truly brilliant creative voices leave the church with remarkable regularity. The point of the imagery in the story is stated and restated so that any clear-headed reader understands the portrayal. It's fiction after all, but with a purpose. It's too bad some Christian leaders who think they are "smart" have missed that point.

That said, I would also argue that even more controversial than the rendering of God as a woman, is a more fundamental angst that many have with "the Shack". Simply put, we can't deal with a God who is so personally in love with people that He would express Himself with such unguarded intimacy. In the pages of Mack's journey and visit with the Trinity, we find a God that is so overwhelmingly in love with each of us that it shakes us to the core. He isn't waiting for us to "go one step to far" before He brings down judgement. He isn't standing at a distance, concerned that He may get Himself dirty with the grime of our puny existence. In this book, we find a God so completely in love with us that He stands in the midst of our pain, of our judgment, of our destructive self-loathing, and even our anger charged accusations towards Him. He stands in the midst of it, and breathes out words of love, life, healing and invitation. He draws into our world with such intimacy, such "motherly" care (which is often a much better metaphor to which Americans could relate with real love) and comfort, that most of us simply recoil back.

While many may say that the most controversial part of the book is using a personality of a woman to portray God, I think more poignant to those same people is a deep seeded repulsion to see God as wholly and completely intimate with our very earthly, human and pain-filled lives. Would God walk with us, eat with us, hold us, cry with us, be patient with us?! Would He? "The Shack" resounds with a resplendent "Yes!"

What is sad is that it is very likely that the people most offended by "the Shack" are the people who need to hear it's message most desperately.

With suspenseful drama, well-thought subplots and astounding imagery, Young's writing of "the Shack" may be the best fictional book since the Lord of the Rings trilogy. You may not agree with the message of "the Shack", but that is the whole point- be challenged and forced to think on your prejudices about God. And all the while, you are taken on a beautiful journey of suspense, love, pain and restoration. Brilliant!

Review by Kim Gentes "


May the Lord open your hearts and minds with this book.  May He stir your soul and spirit to seek Him as He really is...

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Sep 09, 2008 - 7:25AM #5
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Dia annseo isteach!
God to all here!

Greetings all,

I came across this review of 'The Shack' and thought I'd like to post it in a few sites including here.  I hope you will enjoy its reading...

"The Real Controversy about "The Shack"

A culture of change has become the pervading surety of our modern (and post-modern) society. The old adage rings truer than ever- "The only thing constant is change". A couple weeks back, I was stuck in a Wal -Mart at midnight, looking for some power cabling for my laptop. While I waited for someone, I was browsing the book selection. I found an interesting looking title called "the Shack". Little did I know it was the current "buzz book" in the church in the last year. I am not a fast reader, so it took me a couple weeks to get through it. It was a delight.

As I read the book my heart softened, but not gently. I was wounded, beaten, blessed, nurtured, comforted and loved in a cascade of amazing imagery and powerful writing that wore down the pretentious religiosity that lives, to some degree, in each of us. William Young attacks the prejudices of a Christianity lived outside of actual personal relationship with Christ. He uses various devices in his fictional story to bring home the point that we must stop living and believing in a God that is as limited in scope and understanding as we are. His poignant reality in the lives of his characters in "the Shack" echos our cold hearts, living in a rules-based, shame-centered religiosity that claims as many victims as it saves. Critics have assailed the book as being bad theology, but for fictional a script that never claims to be doctrine it hits the jugular of where American Christianity has failed time and time again-- at understanding and living in the love of God.

One could argue that the images and metaphors may not sit well with the buttoned-down theocrats , and that, yes, perhaps the allegories aren't perfect at every level. But the over-arching nuance of Young's book is not that we need a theology class- it's that we need to actually live what we say we believe. That God is love. That His efforts towards us have always been completely done in love, and will continue so. That His primary purposeful intent in dealing with mankind is to make Himself and His love completely and gloriously sufficient for us, whilst giving us the freedom to reciprocate that love back to Him in words and lives of praise, thanksgiving and worship. I am purposefully not going to give away any of the book plot. You can find details on it here:

Hardcover http://www.popularchristian.com/product … s_id=28720

Softcover http://www.popularchristian.com/product … s_id=26107

Audio Book http://www.popularchristian.com/product … s_id=28300

I do want to comment on the most controversial parts of the book, that are drawing criticism. Primarily, readers will discover that the book centers around the main character (Mack) and his weekend encounter with God. In Young's story, the Trinity is articulated through 3 distinct personalities. Specifically, the Father is portrayed as a joyful, and thoroughly loving, black woman. For some Christian leaders, even though this is a fictional story, this rendering has them railing against "the Shack". It's no wonder the truly brilliant creative voices leave the church with remarkable regularity. The point of the imagery in the story is stated and restated so that any clear-headed reader understands the portrayal. It's fiction after all, but with a purpose. It's too bad some Christian leaders who think they are "smart" have missed that point.

That said, I would also argue that even more controversial than the rendering of God as a woman, is a more fundamental angst that many have with "the Shack". Simply put, we can't deal with a God who is so personally in love with people that He would express Himself with such unguarded intimacy. In the pages of Mack's journey and visit with the Trinity, we find a God that is so overwhelmingly in love with each of us that it shakes us to the core. He isn't waiting for us to "go one step to far" before He brings down judgement. He isn't standing at a distance, concerned that He may get Himself dirty with the grime of our puny existence. In this book, we find a God so completely in love with us that He stands in the midst of our pain, of our judgment, of our destructive self-loathing, and even our anger charged accusations towards Him. He stands in the midst of it, and breathes out words of love, life, healing and invitation. He draws into our world with such intimacy, such "motherly" care (which is often a much better metaphor to which Americans could relate with real love) and comfort, that most of us simply recoil back.

While many may say that the most controversial part of the book is using a personality of a woman to portray God, I think more poignant to those same people is a deep seeded repulsion to see God as wholly and completely intimate with our very earthly, human and pain-filled lives. Would God walk with us, eat with us, hold us, cry with us, be patient with us?! Would He? "The Shack" resounds with a resplendent "Yes!"

What is sad is that it is very likely that the people most offended by "the Shack" are the people who need to hear it's message most desperately.

With suspenseful drama, well-thought subplots and astounding imagery, Young's writing of "the Shack" may be the best fictional book since the Lord of the Rings trilogy. You may not agree with the message of "the Shack", but that is the whole point- be challenged and forced to think on your prejudices about God. And all the while, you are taken on a beautiful journey of suspense, love, pain and restoration. Brilliant!

Review by Kim Gentes "


May the Lord open your hearts and minds with this book.  May He stir your soul and spirit to seek Him as He really is...

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 30, 2008 - 10:26PM #6
Liriodendron
Posts: 36
My sister loves this book and has been trying to get me to read it.  She finally marked off the section that told about the little girls murder because that was my big hang up against reading it.  Skipping that, I'm now reluctantly to the part where he first arrives at the Shack. Actually I think hearing about the joyful black women makes me want to read it more.
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6 years ago  ::  Dec 02, 2008 - 8:23PM #7
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Hey Lillian,

Check your socks!  You're about to have them blown off...

The story is not about the little girl, although she does make a comeback!  The story is about a father, faced with his growing  teens, who wants them to understand the reality of God, Christ, the Holy Spirit.  Not the God of Church, the real God!  There is a lot to think about.  There is a lot to learn.  You just may get to see the God the Celts always believed in!  Enjoy...

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Dec 02, 2008 - 8:23PM #8
mfjfarrell
Posts: 237
Hey Lillian,

Check your socks!  You're about to have them blown off...

The story is not about the little girl, although she does make a comeback!  The story is about a father, faced with his growing  teens, who wants them to understand the reality of God, Christ, the Holy Spirit.  Not the God of Church, the real God!  There is a lot to think about.  There is a lot to learn.  You just may get to see the God the Celts always believed in!  Enjoy...

Slan,
Marty
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6 years ago  ::  Dec 05, 2008 - 9:11PM #9
Liriodendron
Posts: 36
Well, you are right about getting my socks knocked off.  I'm really enjoying it.
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