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Switch to Forum Live View The Message of The Qur'an
3 years ago  ::  Nov 08, 2011 - 3:58AM #1
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

Salaam,

I will be, inshaAllah, posting various Verses of The Qur'an in this thread for anyone who may try to understand the guidance and wisdom transmitted in them for the mankind.

In the meantime, below is the Link to a commentary and meanings of translation of The Qur'an by M. Asad, please study and try to benefit from it: 

www.rafalinux.talktalk.net/

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 08, 2011 - 4:06AM #2
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

This is how Asad has described the first Surah of the Qur'an: 


1:1


In the name of God, The Most Gracious, The Dispenser of Grace:1


1:2


ALL PRAISE is due to God alone, the Sustainer of all the worlds,2 (1:3) the Most Gracious,  the Dispenser of Grace, (1:4) Lord of the Day of Judgment!


1:5


Thee alone do we worship; and unto Thee alone do we turn for aid.


1:6


Guide us the straight way  (1:7) the way of those upon whom Thou hast bestowed Thy blessings,3  not of those who have been condemned [by Thee], nor of those who go astray!4


  1 According to most of the authorities, this invocation (which occurs at the beginning of every 
    surah with the exception of surah 9) constitutes an integral part of "The Opening" and is,
    therefore, numbered as verse 1. In all other instances, the invocation "in the name of God"
    precedes the surah as such, and is not counted among its verses. - Both the divine epithets
    rahman and rahim are derived from the noun rahmah, which signifies "mercy", "compassion",
    "loving tenderness" and, more comprehensively, "grace". From the very earliest times, Islamic
    scholars have endeavoured to define the exact shades of meaning which differentiate the two
    terms. The best and simplest of these explanations is undoubtedly the one advanced by Ibn
    al-Qayyim (as quoted in Manar I,48): the term rahman circumscribes the quality of abounding
    grace inherent in, and inseparable from, the concept of God's Being, whereas rahim expresses
    the manifestation of that grace in, and its effect upon, His creation - in other words, an
    aspect of His activity.

  2 In this instance, the term "worlds" denotes all categories of existence both in the physical
    and the spiritual sense. The Arabic expression rabb - rendered by me as "Sustainer" -
    embraces a wide complex of meanings not easily expressed by a single term in another language.
    It comprises the ideas of having a just claim to the possession of anything and, consequently,
    authority over it, as well as of rearing, sustaining and fostering anything from its inception
    to its final completion. Thus, the head of a family is called rabb ad-dar ("master of the house")
    because he has authority over it and is responsible for its maintenance; similarly, his wife
    is called rabbat ad-dar ("mistress of the house"). Preceded by the definite article al, the
    designation rabb is applied, in the Qur'an, exclusively to God as the sole fosterer and
    sustainer of all creation - objective as well as conceptual - and therefore the ultimate
    source of all authority.

  3  i.e., by vouchsafing to them prophetic guidance and enabling them to avail themselves thereof.

  4  According to almost all the commentators, God's "condemnation" (ghadab, lit., "wrath") is
     synonymous with the evil consequences which man brings upon himself by wilfully rejecting
     God's guidance and acting contrary to His injunctions. Some commentators (e.g., Zamakhshari)
     interpret this passage as follows: "... the way of those upon whom Thou hast bestowed Thy
     blessings - those who have not been condemned [by Thee], and who do not go astray": in
     other words, they regard the last two expressions as defining "those upon whom Thou hast
     bestowed Thy blessings". Other commentators (e.g., Baghawi and Ibn Kathir) do not subscribe
     to this interpretation - which would imply the use of negative definitions - and understand
     the last verse of the surah in the manner rendered by me above. As regards the two categories
     of people following a wrong course, some of the greatest Islamic thinkers (e.g., Al-Ghazali
     or, in recent times, Muhammad 'Abduh) held the view that the people described as having
     incurred "God's condemnation" - that is, having deprived themselves of His grace - are those
     who have become fully cognizant of God's message and, having understood it, have rejected it;
     while by "those who go astray" are meant people whom the truth has either not reached at all,
     or to whom it has come in so garbled and corrupted a form as to make it difficult for them
     to recognize it as the truth (see 'Abduh in Manar 1,68 ff.).
I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 08, 2011 - 4:31AM #3
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

Can't Disown Actions Al-Isra (The Night Journey) - Chapter 17: Verse 13


"Every human being's action have We tied around his own neck. On the Day of Resurrection We shall produce for him a record which he will find wide open."


The Arabic phraseology of this verse provides a highly graphic description which uses the word, 'bird', in place of 'action', as used in the translated text. Thus we have here a metaphor referring to what flies of a person's actions and becomes tied around his neck, so that it never parts from him.


A person's actions do not leave him, and he cannot disown them. The same applies to the wide open record of all his actions. Thus whatever he has done in life is laid bare. He cannot hide, ignore or disown it. Both descriptions of the bird denoting action and the record thrown open produce a very strong effect that adds to the fears experienced on that very difficult day when nothing remains hidden.


The causes that lead us to ultimate salvation, to our perpetual happiness or unending misery, lie within ourselves. It is the proper use of our natural faculties, our power of judgment and decision, our preference and choice which makes us earn either happiness or misery.


People who do not understand things properly hold external factors to be responsible for their fortune. If people were to critically examine themselves, they would appreciate that the factors which had put them on the road to their destruction and ultimately led to their undoing lay within themselves - their own bad character traits and bad decisions. Their destruction was not thrust upon them by outside factors.


Compiled From: "In The Shade of The Quran" - Sayyid Qutb, Vol. 11, p. 140 "Towards Understanding the Quran" - Sayyid Abul Ala Mawdudi, vol. 5, p. 29


www.fridaynasiha.com

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 08, 2011 - 4:41AM #4
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

This is how M. Asad has translated and interpreted Verse 17:13 of The Qur'an:


17:13 And every human being's destiny have We tied to his neck;17 and on the Day of Resurrection We shall  bring forth for him a record which he will find wide open;


  17 The word ta'ir literally signifies a "bird" or, more properly, a "flying creature". Since the 
    pre-Islamic Arabs often endeavoured to establish a good or bad omen and, in general, to foretell
    the future from the manner and direction in which birds would fly, the term ta'ir came to be
    tropically used in the sense of "fortune", both good and evil, or "destiny". (See in this connection
    surah 3, note 37, and surah 7, note 95.) It should, however, be borne in mind that the Qur'anic
    concept of "destiny" relates not so much to the external circumstances of and events in man's life
    as, rather, to the direction which this life takes in result of one's moral choices: in other words,
    it relates to man's spiritual fate - and this, in its turn, depends - as the Qur'an so often
    points out - on a person's inclinations, attitudes and conscious actions (including self-restraint
    from morally bad actions or, alternatively, a deliberate omission of good actions). Hence, man's
    spiritual fate depends on himself and is inseparably linked with the whole tenor of his personality;
    and since it is God who has made man responsible for his behaviour on earth, He speaks of Himself
    as having "tied every human being's destiny to his neck".
I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 09, 2011 - 7:15AM #5
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

5:8 O YOU who have attained to faith! Be ever steadfast in your devotion to God, bearing witness  to the truth in all equity; and never let hatred of anyone lead you into the sin of  deviating from justice. Be just: this is closest to being God-conscious. And remain conscious  of God: verily, God is aware of all that you do.

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2011 - 4:49AM #6
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

No Compulsion


Al Baqarah (The Cow) - Chapter 2: Verse 256 (partial)


"There shall be no compulsion in religion. The right way is henceforth distinct from error."


This reflects the honour God has reserved for man and the high regard in which man's will, thought and emotions are held, and the freedom he is granted to choose his beliefs, and the responsible position he is afforded to be judge of his own actions.


Freedom of belief is the most basic right that identifies man as a human being. To deny anyone this right is to deny him or her humanity. Freedom of belief also implies the freedom to express and propagate one's belief without fear of threat or persecution; otherwise, that freedom is hollow and meaningless.


The Arabic text, using a generic negative, imparts a negation of the very idea of compulsion. When it comes to matters of belief, not only should these never be imposed by coercion or compulsion, but there cannot even be an option to use such a means of conversion or persuasion.


Although the meaning and application is general, several incidents are reported to have occasioned the revelation of this verse. Here're a few:



A man's two sons converted to Christianity and wanted to migrate to Syria in the company of Christian traders who had come from there. Their father however embraced Islam and enquired the Prophet (peace be upon him) if he could force them into Islam. Allah revealed this verse (Ibn Jarir, Ibn Kathir).


It was a custom among the Ansar of Madina that if a woman's sons did not survive, she vowed that if the child lived he would be converted to Judaism. There were many such Judaized children in Madina. When Banu Nadir were banished they wanted to carry along those children with them. The Ansar maintained that since it was before the advent of Islam they would not let their sons go with them. So Allah revealed this verse to say that whoever wanted to stay back could do so and whoever wanted to go was free to do so (Ibn Jarir, Ibn Kathir, Abu Dawud, Nasai).



Compiled From: "In The Shade of The Quran" - Sayyid Qutb, Vol. 1, pp. 325, 326 "Tafsir Ishraq Al-Ma'ani" - Syed Iqbal Zaheer, Vol. 1, pp. 315, 316 (www.fridaynasiha.com)

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 22, 2011 - 1:15PM #7
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

[18.46] Wealth and children are an adornment of the life of this world; and the ever-abiding, the good works, are better with your Lord in reward and better in expectation.


[63.9] O you who believe! let not your wealth, or your children, divert you from the remembrance of Allah; and whoever does that, these are the losers.

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 27, 2011 - 3:53AM #8
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

[25.61] Blessed is He Who made the constellations in the heavens  and made therein a lamp and a shining moon.


[25.62] And He it is Who made the night and the day to follow  each other for him who desires to be mindful or desires to  be thankful.

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Nov 27, 2011 - 2:48PM #9
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

[4.58] Surely Allah commands you to make over trusts to their  owners and that when you judge between people you judge with  justice; surely Allah admonishes you with what is excellent;  surely Allah is Seeing, Hearing.

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 02, 2011 - 2:38AM #10
Ibn
Posts: 4,830

10:55


Oh, verily, unto God belongs all that is in the heavens and on earth! Oh, verily, God's promise always  comes true - but most of them know it not!


(10:56)


He alone grants life and deals death; and unto Him  you all must return.


10:57


O MANKIND! There has now come unto you an admonition from your Sustainer, and a cure for all [the ill]  that may be in men's hearts, and guidance and grace unto all who believe [in Him].

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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